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Vol. XXVII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 3, 1916. 



No. 1 



FIFTIETH COLLEGE YEAR 
OPENS WITH ASSEMBLY 

President Butterf ield Welcomes Men 

Back. Announcements and 

Changes During Summer. 

At the firBt assembly, Wednesday 
afternoon, President Kenyon L. 
Butterfield welcomed the old and 
new students in to another year of 
progress and work at the institution. 
He expressed the hope that the com- 
ing college year would be a great 
one, not necessarily in the physical 
growth of the college in numbers, 
but in the development of a better 
Aggie spirit. Among other an- 
nouncements the President men- 
tioned the success of the Summer 
School aud Graduate Summer School, 
the opening of the new microbiology 
building at an early date, and the 
near completion of the rural engin- 
eering shops. He also announced 
the purchase of a tract of land just 
south of the athletic field, long 
wanted by the college, and now be- 
ing held pending the development of 
a general recreation ground for the 
students. 

A new system is to be worked out 
this year, which will make possible 
advisors for the freshmen, as has 
always been the caBe. but also pro- 
vides advisorB for the upper class 
men. This change is sure to be 
popular and consists of the following 
men of the faculty i Seniors, Dean 
lewis ; juniors, Dr. Chamberlain ; 
sophomores, Dr. Ernest Anderson 
and Professor MacKimmie ; and for 
the freshmen, Professors Bobbins 
aud M uili me r and Mr. Rand. 

The commission appointed by the 
Governor to investigate the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, as 
well as agriculture in general, will 
hold its first hearing in the old stone 
d.apel, Wednesday at 10 a. m. This 
committee is composed of Hon. 
Pay son Smith, ex-ofilcio. Dr. L. 
Clarke Seelye, chairman, Mr. Whit- 
ing of Holyoke, Mr. Jewett of Wor- 
cester and Mr. Burbank. Other 
hearings are scheduled as follows s 
Boston, Oct. 13; Springfield, Oct. 
19 ; and Boston, Oct. 24. The pub- 
lic i* cordially invited to attend 
these meetings as they will present a 
flue opportunity for Massachusetts 
people to learn what the Agricultural 
College is doing for the young men 
and women. 

[Cotiiiuaed on pftf* >l 



UNUSUALLY SMALL NUMBER 
ENROLL IN ENTERING CLASS 

Only 153 Register to Pate as Com- 
pared with Over 200 Last Sep- 
tember. Nine Co-eds. 



UNDERGRADS AND ALUMNI FOOTBALL SQUAD FAST 



CELEBRATE FOUNDERS' DAY 



One hundred and fifty-three stu- 
dents, nine of them young women, 
were the official registration figures 
given out Saturday night for the class 
of 1920, a decrease of over 25 per- 
cent from last year's entering class, 
which numbered well over two hun- 
dred. Fifteen of these are from 
other states than Massachusetts, one 
coming from Cuba. It is expected 
that the number of freshmen will be 
considerably increased bv additional 
regular registrations, and also by a 
plan recently indorsed by the faculty, 
permitting entrance on probation for 
those one-half a credit short. 

Many peculiar name combinations 
appear in the list, according to the 
following tale : 

"Several Thrown hyon* that bad 
been let Lm-e and were trying to 
Hyde among the Maples in the Gf®§ 
of Early morning during a fall of 
Hale and Snow, suddenly become 
enraged when their Keen ears Hurd 
the Home of the Kii«J of Holland, 
and it required all the f>q/?a-man- 
ship of seven Smiths two Taylors 
and a Plowman to prevent a Wauyh- 
like scene worse than that at Bunker 
Hill. 

Another story for the l'ai, r of 
history Reeds as sweet as Cande all 
Wriijhl, about a man who plays 
Card* while the Cole in his fire Bums 
out." 

Allen, Harold K.. Belchertown. 

Andrews, George H., 

Parmington, Conn. 
Apsev, George W. Jr , Winchester. 
Armstrong, John S., Fast Sandwich. 

Armstrong, Philip B., 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Babcock, LeiHe K., Marlboro. 

Bacon, MiloR. Leominster, 

Bailey, William, 
Ball, Harry A., 
Ball, I-orin E,, 
Beauregard, Winfleld S , 

Framinghara. 

Berman, Harry, Holyoke 

Bigelow, Henry C, MHlville, N. J. 
Blake, Robert A„ Wollarton. 

Blanchard, Kenneth, Baverh.ll. 

Boardman, Charles M.. Amherst. 
Bowen, Abram T., Granville, N. Y. 
Bowmar, Ralph B., C«ton. 

Brown, Roy R., Wollaston, 

[continued o» P«S« H 



Bridgewater 
Amherst 



Forty-ninth Opening of M. A. C. In- 
teresting Program Around 
Large Bonfire. 

Despite the cold wind, a large 
gathering of students, alumni and 
visitors were present at Founders' 
Day celebration held Saturday even- 
ing in the pit. The regular football 
bleacherB were arranged around in a 
Berai-circle, providing every one a 
good view of the fire and speaker's 
platform. After a few preliminary 
cheers led by Westman '17, who 
acted as toastraaster, Buckman *17, 
president of the Senate, welcomed 
the freshmen by a very unique aud 
fitting address. 

After Grayson, captain of footb 11 
had spoken urging student support, 
the bonfire was lighted raising the 
atmospheric temperature to an agree- 
able degree. Coaches Melican and 
Perry followed with speeches enthu- 
siastic of the prospects of the team 
and Palmer praised the scrubs and 
called for cheers. Manager Holden 
urged the students to have confidence 
in the team's winning power. 

Professor Hicks was next in ro- 
duced. Although admitting a hard 
schedule for the football team he 
assured the students that the team, 
with their support, combined with an 
excellent system of coaching would 
finish aBeason creditable to the 
college. 

The song "Fight on to Victory" 
was led by Griggs 'IS, the composer. 
His speech which followed concerned 
leadership and co-operation in stu- 
dent activities. Captain Fleet of the 
military department spoke of the 
Plattaburg camp and the Aggie men 
enrolled Gillette 'OH gave a short 
talk on college enthusiasm and co- 
operation applied to the football 
season. 

President Butterfield was the last 
speaker of the evening. Following 
his usual custom of presenting a 
watchword for the coming year he 
gave this year's motto : "Be ambi- 
tious." He urged the students to be 
rational with studies and activities 
and to boost Aggie by planning for 
the future. Singing led by Nichol- 
son *16 concluded the program for the 
evening. 



ROUNDING INTO SHAPE 

Candidates Report for Practice 

Early. Team to Play Conn. 

Aggies Saturday. 



•07,— Henry T. Pierce has an- 
nounced his marriage to Miss Msry 
L. Morton of New York city. 



Thirty-five men answered Capt. 
Grayson's call for football candi- 
dates aud reported for practice Sept. 
18. This year M. A. C, is playing 
such teams as Harvard, Dartmouth 
und Cornell, ami it is hard to say 
just what the prospects are. The 
team has had longer to practice be- 
fore the first game this year than in 
any previous season and all are well 
trained in the fundamentals. Al- 
though nine "M" men were lost by 
graduation, there still remains a 
nucleus of playerB who have been in 
one or more varsity games. The 
veterans out this year are : Capt. 
Grayson M7, Dunn '18, Weeks MM, 
Bolen '17, Holmes '1H, Spaulding 'lh, 
Roberts '1H, Omj 17 and Richardson 
'18. Of these nine veterans only 
four are letter men, but there is a 
large Bquad to pick other men from. 
The other candidates out are ; quart- 
erbacks— Whittle '19, Mack '17, F. 
GlSften '18 and (J. K. Blanchard 
"19 ; backs— Good wiu *18, Moynihan 
*18, Pond '19, Rorstrom '17 and 
Clough '17; ends— Higginbothsjn 
'17, Irving '17, Maginnis '18, Gray 
•18, Cooley M9, Sawyer *18 and 
Behrend *17 ; linemen— McNaught 
•18, Sauter '17, tides »18, C. D. 
Blanchard * 19, Tilton '18, Nash '17. 
Wood '19, Kd wards "17, Hagelstein 
*17 and Fraser '18. 

The opening game with Connecti- 
cut "Aggies" will lie played on 
Alumui field Saturday, giving a 
very good chance to get a line on the 
men as everybody will probably have 
an opportunity to show their worth. 
There have been but four scrimmages 
bo far and very few men have been 
injured. Huunewell '18 was put out 
for the season when he hurt his 
shoulder, and Buttrick '17, a veteran 
from last year, had to quit on ac- 
count of fallen arches. 

The schedule is as follows; 
Oct. 7— Conn. Agricultural College 
at Amherst, 
11 — Dartmouth at Hanover, 

N. H. 
21 — Harvard at Cambridge. 
28— W. P. I. at Amherst. 
jq or , 4_Tufta at Medford. 

11 — Williams at Williamstown. 
18 — Cornell at Ithaca, N. Y. 
2fi— Springfield at Springfield. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



PRESIDENT BUTTTERF1ELD 

SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

President Butterfield was the 
speaker at the first Sunday chapel of 
the year. He took his text from the 
second hook of Kings; "The Lord 
opened the eves of the young man 
and he saw." He said, "Insight is 
the supreme gift a college offers to 
its students. College should train 
us to get more out of life than a 
good time, to see the opportunities 
that are before us, to teach us the 
meaning of work, to teach us the 
meaning of broad fellowship, and to 
give us somewhat of a revelation of 
the eternal. 

"- Insight is the supreme gift that 
the college offers to its students. 
Insight is the power to see below the 
surface. To have insight is to un- 
derstand the meaning of things. 

"Some come to college for the 
discipline of miud that will give 
them power. Some think that a 
degree is a letter of distinction, but 
the assumption that the college man 
is in some way superior to the rest of 
the world is not warranted, for there 
are many very smart men that never 
went to college. Some men come to 
college merely to have a good time. 
When pleasure becomes a man's 
chief object in life, the man becomes 
a spendthrift and wastes both time 
and money. Some are thinking of 
the job that is at the end of the col- 
lege career. Mauv go through life 
looking for a good time and are so 
troubled over the little things that 
they do not see the eternal things in 
life. The chief value of the college 
is to open the student's eyes. All 
the knowledge, power, distinction 
and pleasure that a man may get at 
college are small compensation if 
his stay there does not bring results. 

"Insight opens the eyes of the 
man to the meaning of life itself. 
To millions of people life seems hard 
and rough and they rebel against the 
conditions that give ease and com- 
fort to others. Others waste their 
time dissapating and dragging man 
and womanhood into the mire. Here 
in the mountain tops of experience 
one should tee the far horizons of 
opportunity, and should see the re- 
sources of heaven that are at his dis- 
posal. 

"The college training should open 
one's eyes to the meaning of work. 
Work is not a curse but almost the 
supreme good. When a man renders 
his best services for the sake of his 
fellow men be increases his own 
powers at the same time. Profit, 
wages, and salary should be factors 
in work, but service is of first im- 
portance, 

"The col leg e life should reveal the 
meaning of a broad fellowship. Col- 
lege brings to us the dignity of man, 
and shows as the real meaning of the 
labor struggles, which with, all their 
faults are the essence of a new de- 
mocracy. College gives man the 
passion of helpfulness to the com- 
mon people largely because he is one 



of them. The beauties and the 
wonders of nature belong to the fra- 
ternity of the opeu eye. 

"The four years of college should 
bring lo us something of a revelation 
of the eternal. God is training men 
for a larger and a freer life. Col- 
lege should help us see the miud of 
God. The biggest and best that one 
can gain from this place, above all. 
is the opportunity to learn to see." 

COOD NUCLEUS OF MEN 

FOR CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

To Run W. P. I. Oct. 28. Track Team 
Loses Service oi Captain Birchard. 

Candidates for the cross country 
team were called out Monday, and 
judging from the men that have been 
training individually the past few 
days, the prospects for a winning 
team are good. Five men are lost to 
the team through graduation but their 
places will be filled by men who were 
ineligible last year. Carpenter, the 
winner of last year's inter-class cross 
country run and one of the most con- 
sistent point winners on the boards 
and in the spring Hrack meets, will be 
able to run on the varsity this year. 
Lyons who is putting in his third year, 
and who has made I good showing in 
past seasons, will undoubtedly be at 
his best. Schwartz '18, is back 
once more, and if he shows any of his 
old form, he will make a valuable 
addition to the team. With these 
men as a nucleus and several others 
who ought to show up well, there are 
prospects for a team that will hold 
their own with any bill or dale team. 

Manager Flint has but one definite 
date settled, that being with Worces- 
ter Tech. on Oct. 28 at Amherst. 
He is also trying to arrange a run 
with Williams to be run at Williams- 
town on the day that the football team 
plays Williams. The Inter-collegi- 
ates, which come the last of Novem- 
ber will wind up the season. 

The track team will this year be 
without the services of Captain J. 
Dixon Birchard of Springfield, as he 
failed to return. He was the high- 
est point winner last season and 
his loss will he greatly felt. A new 
captain will not be elected until later 
in the season. 

Manager Flint issues a call for can- 
didates to report at the Drill Hall 
erery day as near after 4 o'clock as 
possible. 

FRESHMEN ELECT OFFICERS 
Directly after assembly Wednes- 
day, the class of 1920 held its first 
election, 8. 5, Smith, president <»f 
the junior class presiding. Fred V. 
Waugh of Amherst was elected pres- 
ident, Warren M. Dewing of Kings- 
ton vice-president, Miss Helen Mil- 
lard of Great Harrington secretary, 
Ralph S. Stedman of Springfield 
treasurer, Ivan A. Roberts of South 
Lee class captain, and Starr M. King 
of Pittsfield sergeant at arms. The 
class historian will be selected by 
competition, the Index board to be 
the judges. 



MUSICAL CLUBS PLANNING 
FOR ATTRACTIVE SCHEDULE 

Trips to Boston and New York. Call 

for Candidates. Several Vacancies 

to be Filled. 

Plans are well under way for the 
coming season in the musical clubs. 
Manager Lipshires is preparing for 
Christmas and Faster trips that will 
take the clubs to Boston and vicinitv, 
also to New York. Besides these 
there will be a large number of dates 
in the towns about Amherst, thus 
completing a very satisfactory sched- 
ule. The trip to Boston during the 
Christmas recess will begin Dec. 20 
and iast through until the first of 
January. The tentative schedule in- 
cludes dates at Falmouth, Haverhill, 
Somerville, Filene's Restaurant,Hing- 
ham, Hotel Somerset and Newbury- 
port. 

The management is especially 
desirous that a large number of men 
come out for places in the various 
musical clubs and the orchestra. 
Though the glee club lost several 
good men by graduation last June, 
leader Edwards has several likely can- 
didates that will probably fill in the 
vacancies. Professor Bigelow of 
Amherst will again coach the Glee 
club. From pre-season appearances 
the mandolin club looks strong. 
However, there is room for several 
new men. especially those having 
ukeleles. W.C. Knipfer of Hartford 
has been engaged as coach. 

The management is very urgent 
that a large number of freshmen re- 
port for practice. Though they will 
be ineligible until the third term, it is 
hoped that they can take part iu the 
Easter trip to New York. 



JUPITER PLUVIUS UNABLE 

TO BREAK UP RECEPTION 

Y. M. C. A. Extends Welcome to 
Freshmen Despite Downpour. 

Notwithstanding the fact that there 
was a driving rain on Friday light, a 
large number of freshmen and upper- 
classmen attended the Y. M. C. A. 
reception. Dana O, Merrill *17, of 
Pepperell, who is the president of the 
association, introduced President But- 
terfield, who gave a short address of 
welcome. Prof. Harold E. Bobbins 
of the mathematical department ex- 
plained the purpose of the work of 
the non-athletic association, and 
Francis G, Edwards *17, of Beverly, 
spoke in a brief manner of the in- 
creasing importance of the Musical 
and Dramatic clubs. Following this 
Richard W. Smith »17, of Pittsfield, 
d e s cri bed the work of the Collegia*, 
the index,,, and Aggie's humorous 
paper The Squib, David M. Lip- 
shires *J8, of Somerville, spoke on 
various undergraduate activities and 
duos, and finally President Merrill 
brought before the men the present 
status of religious organisations at 
the college, urging the co-operation 
of the students in carrying out the 
plans of the association for social ser- 
vice work in near-by communities. 




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60-cent Luncheon from 11-30 to 2 p.m. 
Special Diihei at All Haert 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that if the bows want 

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with the best quality oi 

leather, drop in 

and see 

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1 1 y 2 Amity Street 

The "Nonotuck" 

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Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 




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COMMUNICATION 



COLLEGE DOINGS OF THE 90S 



'[,> riiK Kihtou Of the CoiAEQiAH : 

I wish to take (bid opportunity to 
inures* to the student body my earn- 
t ,„t desire that each and every one of 

them give their support to the Dining 
Hull this coming year. As you un- 
doahtedty know, the Dining Hall is 
lini |ei- an entirely new management 
tthnh will do its utmost to make 
eowlitioM the host ever. Believing 
ttiut the food iii past years has heen 
tfie sore spot iimoiig the students, 
and I write this believing that after 
;, rear's experience as assistant head- 
water 1 uudei stand conditions pretty 
•ell)'. I wish to take this opportun- 
ity to explain to them that during 
,l„. coming yes* all supplies 
•ill be purchased by Hutchinson 'H 
: md myself, and we will see that 
nothing but the best shall be shipped 
to the college. 

The college is trying to do its 
pari and it now remains for the stu- 
deftt body to get behind and boost. 
The more that eat at the Hall the 
j.s, the board rate will be. Pood 
llOffB and provisions have gone up 
tremendously in price during this 
summer ami in order to offer a min- 
imum rate of board a large per cent 
u f the students must eat there. 
Above all they must not critiei/..-. 

If von can't boost. <lo not say any- 
thing thai will lower the estimation 
,.f the Dining Hall in the minds of 
vi. in fellow classmates. 

1 am sure that Miss Kennedy, our 
Kt dietician, and Mr. Fairbanks, 
our new professional head-waiter. 
trill see that the food is tastily 
cooked and served. 

Willi the students' support they 
em make the Dining Hall an institu- 
tion of which any college will be 
proad. It is up to you as a body to 

*t. 

Yours in M. A. C, 
Kuank A. Anderson, 'Ifi. 



The following articles were taken 
from Agijif Lift, the college paper 
during the nineties. These slum- 
that the problems of those days were 
similar to those we confront today : 

"In view of the fact that students, 
especially freshmen, are liable to 
circulate among frieuds at home ex- 
aggerated reports of little incidents 
common to college life, a few words 
of warning may be timely. In the 
first place, that students have a 
wonderful capacity for manufactur- 
ing stories, any one acquainted with 
college life well knows ; aud further- 
more the student often finds it neces- 
sary in relating the circumstances to 
use his ingenuity in enlarging upon 
the episode. While m many cases 
these little incidents would be for- 
gotten, occasionally a person receives 
from them a wrong impression which 
may result in serious consequences. 
So let us be on the safe side, and in 
our conversation and correHpotul- 
ence restrict ourselves to what can 
have no possible tendency to injure 
the good name of our institution." 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



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Crofut ft Knapp. also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 »P- 

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Ready-to-wear Clothes for young men from Atterbury System Fifth 
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Made-to-your-measure Clothes. Irotii $25.00 up. 

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this department and is an expert in the business. 

ONI oi i hi, Bkst Custom Taii-»k»n«-. Dki'akiments in nit: Stai i 



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M*PLE PACKING SCHOOL 

Tins morning saw the opening of 
tin; annual school of apple grading 
ruid packing at M. A. C. under the 
.lir,,ti«»n of W. 1>. Hurd, supervisor 
of fMit.rl courses. Nearly thirty men 
tm- registered for the one week course 
which began at 10 a. M. with a dis- 
...n of the state apple grading 
iu« », v Wilfrid Wheeler, state secre- 
tary of iigriculture. Other demon- 
ions and lectures will be given 
Uit.,!i>£ho!it the week by professors 
(ram the department of pomology. 



It may also be interesting to note 
that it was once a custom at Aggie 
to stage a cane rush, but the practice 
was abaudoned for good and all bj 
the classes of '96 and '07. Com- 
menting on this action Aggk I 
Sept. 20, '98, says : 

'•It certainly speaks well for Aggie 
that such is the character of the two 
lower classes that a re-esUblishnient 
of the barbarous cane rush is now 
impossible. The annual cam- ntah 
at Amherst College, * * WSI 

a good object lesuon to any one in- 
terested in our educational institu- 
tions to see fainting, exhausted men 
hurled headlong from out of masses 
of 200 or more excited rushers. The 
violence and brutality shown at that 
contest were no inducements to the 
re-establishment of this half civilized 
custom at K. A. ('•" 

The classes of ".Mi and **.«7 engaged 
in a rope pull which was won by the 
class of '96, with the result that 
pieces of rope decorated the rooms 
of the successful sophomores 



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ORABtfATE SCHOOL LECTUBES 

Professor Newli u of Amherst col- 
lip will lecture before the graduate 
! of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural (..liege, Wednesday afternoon. 
Oct Ifti at 4-30 in Clark hall. The 
t of his lecture will he "The 
I i Philosophies." This lecture is 
in Hcries of lectures to be given 
th* graduate school each 
Admission to this course of 
will be free to students and 
' -of the college; the fee for 

»t affiliated to the college will 
for the term. 



ROPE PULL POSTPONED 

Wet weather, weak rope, and » 
postponement featured the sopho- 
more-fresbmsn 60 man rope-pull at- 
tempt last Friday afternoon. Both 
classes were ready to start at 4 - 1 .1 
and dispite the drizzle, a fair erowd 
assembled to watch the annual afTnir, 
Hardly had the pull starM. however, 
when the rope parted »e : " the n| W" 
dle and both sides went back tm 
gains. The rope was carried across 
the pond and tied but broke again in 
in the next attempt, resulting is an 
indefinite postponement of the affair. 



Burpee's Seeds Grow 

rpOR forty yaa% we h»*e rrndrtrd hAWul «**»«*. Fa f forty 

I ye «, wr h.ve tried lo m*ke each yMi*l •emee mote nearly 

ide.1 Thii untiring effort h« built lor ut not only The World « 

L*#8e* Mail Order Seed Bwbe*. but alio a World Wtlr 

fepuUtioii for Effc»cy and undaputed leaderAip. TU 

Fortieth Anni*enary Edrtioo of Burpee'. Annual, thm 

"Lwdins A»«rie«i S«*l Ctolof " * hr^a «d 

belter th« ewr. ll » mailed free. A p«tcard will bno« *. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower*, 



Burpee Building* 



1 Grower*, 

Philadelphia 



Pace's Shoe Store 

Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
,j XI ,ert we^»l«*i.. «»©«* !©•»«*•»*• u«ed 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



.if>,_Mr. and Mrs. Frank II P»- 
tridge are receiving eongt»M»l«t»W 
on the birth of a daughter. Bather 
Mae, Sept. 1st. 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH »17. Bdltor-ln-Chtaf 

MARSHALL O. LANPHBAR 'IS, M'ginit Editor 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17. Assistant Editor 
WILLIAM BAVILLR. JR. IT. Alumni Editor 



Assort ATK Editokk. 

JOHN T. IM/KH '17 

JOSBl'H F. WHIT.SE\ '17 
FRANK J. HINKB'IH 

NATHAN W. (ilLLBTTB 'la 

EDWAHI* N. MITCHELL 'U 
ELIOT M. BUFFUM 'la 

MYRTON F. EVANS '19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER '17. Business Manager 
JAMES C. POWELL '18. 

Assistant Business Manager 
B1RHER R. ROSEQ1IST 1«. 

Advertising Manager 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second r lass matter at the A mherst 
Post Office. 

Yol. IIYII. Tuesday, Oct. 3. No. 1 



The Collegian board regrets to 
announce the resignation of Elliott 
Henderson '17, of Hinghnm, and 
George C Campbell '!!>, of Balti- 
more, Md.. who have left college. 
John T. Dizer '17, of East Wey- 
mouth has been elected to till the 
vacancy on the editorial staff, but as 
vet no action has been taken toward 
choosing a new circulation manager. 



Wki.m.me freshmen: You un- 
doubtedly come to "Old Aggie" in 
a state of expectancy ; — expecting to 
find here an institution where you 
may profitably spend four of the 
most important years of your life ; 
expecting to make here friendships 
true and strong, that will be a help 
and inspiration to you throughout 
your later years ; expecting to de- 
velop here your spirit, mind and 
body, that you may be successful 
men of character— leaders — in the 
years to come. These things are 
yours at "Old Aggie" but, like all 
good things, they cost something. 
Yon will not be disappointed in your 
expectations if you will do your 
share, if you are willing to pay the 
price. The college expects some- 
thing of you in return. Last spring 
the college graduated a class of 
leaders ; leaders in college activity, 
and leaders scholsstically. Can we 
look to you to some day fill their shoes ? 
By getting down to business with 
your studies you will mske the right 
kind of" start. Then should follow 
your active participation in college 
activities, without which you cannot 
develop to your greatest possibilities. 

Welcome, freshmen, for your sake 
and ours. Boost "Old Aggie" and 
"Old Aggie" will boost job ! 

♦94,__Louis M. Barker, custodian 
of vaults, real estate department. 
Room 579, South Station, Boston. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

A seven acre piece known as the 
Dickinson Leonard land directly 
south of the athletic field is the latest 
addition to the college property. 
It iB to be used as a part of the gen- 
eral recreation grounds of the col- 
lege and is of great value for that 
purpose, especially so, since, but for 
the interest of two friends of the col- 
lege it would have been sold to other 
parties long ago. 

Through the direct influence of 
Dr. Wellington, the day the college 
option on this seven acre piece ran 
out, J. F. Dickinson ex-'8o and E. 
P, Leonard were interested in the 
land and took over the option, hav- 
ing held the land for the college 
since then. This summer money 
was available to take it over and it is 
now college property. 

A half acre of land on East Pleas- 
ant street, directly across from the 
orchard is another addition small in 
size but important in that it its 146 
feet front gives the college an un- 
broken frontage on that street. 

The much talked of Mt. Toby 
land is soon to become the actual 
property of the college. Surveyors 
have been working there all summer 
and within a few weeks now the 
tranfer will be complete. 

1500 tons of coal will be the storage 
capacity of the new coal pocket at 
the power plaut when the retaining 
wall is completed. 

The contract for the new rural en- 
gineering building, back of Stock- 
bridge hall, calls for completion by 
Oct. 1st, and the building will be 
ready for classes Boon after that. 
The new microbiology building 
will also be ready in a few weeks. 

During the summer the grounds 
department has not been idle as a 
look at the ravine will show. It is 
the object of the department to make 
this hitherto unvisited section one of 
the campus beauty spots and "Lov- 
ers Lane" is a good beginning. 
Shrubs and perennial beds around 
the south end of the pond are also 
results of the grounds depart- 
ment's work. 

Another important improvement 
from the senior point of view is the 
large "1917" set in the campus walk 
near the south end of the pond. 



DRILL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The outline for the drill this fall is 
practically the same as in previous 
years except that on account of the 
change in the length of terms military 
training will probably continue until 
the Christmas recess. The freshmen 
companies will be drilled in close 
and extended order, as will the 
upper-classmen as a preliminary to 
the regular work assigned to them. 
This latter will consist of field exer- 
cises pertaining to Bcouting, advance 
and rear-guard problems and out- 
post duty for the sophomore compa- 
nies, while the juniora will have gal- 
lery practice followed by shooting on 
the range. 

A law that was passed last August, 
but which, on account of some details 
that have not been worked out as yet, 
will not go into effect until next fall, 
will change the aspect of military 
drill in land-grant colleges. Briefly 
it means that the college will become 
a military one, the full soldier's equip- 
ment being furnished by the gov- 
ernment for each cadet, and a 
certain amount of pay given to 
the men. It will also provide an 
officer's training corps in the college. 

The military department, under 
Captain Fleet, has made the follow- 
ing appointments for the ensuing 

year : 

Colonel, Oliver S.Flint '17 ; Majors, 
Walter A. Mack '17 and Lewis T. 
Buckman '17; Captains, Albert B. 
Loring '17, W. Raymond Inring '17, 
Lincoln D. Kelsey '17, William Sa- 
ville, Jr., '17, Philip R. Babcock 
»17, Charles H. Hagelstein '17 ; Mon- 
sell H. Davis '17, Leland J. Graham 
'17 and Harold B. Pierce '17 as 
adjutant. First Lieutenants: John 
H. Chapin *18, Theodore H. Reu- 
mann '18, L. W. Adams '18, Walter 
F. Rutter '18, John B. Minor, Jr. 
*18, Nathan W. Gillette '18, George 
F. Holmes '18, Ralph W. Horlbut 
18. Second Lieutenants: Sidney 
S. Smith *1H, Deane W. Sanborn *18, 
Milton B. Gray '18, Max S. Marshall 
*18, Fred B. Sampson '18, Hamilton 
K. Foster *18 ; William S. Sawyer 
18 and Edward N. Mitchell '18. 



fiotel Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. *l. AHERN, MANAGER 



"BIDE-A-WEE 



» 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other good things to est 

MRS. L. m. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 415-W 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR M'SllAV SERVICE AT 7 P. M. 

FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 

College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J, HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

THrphon* SOO 



MOVIES SATURDAY 

Aggie itu-'ents will be offered an 
unusually good program of motion 
pictures la Stockbridge auditorium 
Saturday evening when the social 
union committee plans to show two 
five-reel feature films. Inasmuch as 
a ban has been put on the town hall 
show until after Oct. 11, the students 
have here a good opportunity to see 
good pictures at the usual price of 
lefi cents. 

*I9,— E, H. Sbarpe is now in the 
grocery business in Frederick, Md. 
Mr. Sharps reports himself to be in 
the best of health, snd as prospering 
in a business way. 



SOPHOMORES RAISE HAVOC 
WITH 1920'S NIGHT-SHIRTS 

Nineteen night-shirts or portions 
thereof, some of them all wool but 
the buttons, were aU that were left 
Thursday evening when the roll was 
called up yonder In the roped off 
area on Freshman Field after the 
first contest of the kind ever held on 
this campus. According to new 
rales, the two lower classes formed 
concentric circles, drop-tbe-hsnky 
fashion, the sophomores on the out- 
side looking in, the frosh on the in- 
side staring out. A plain quadrille 
stunt lasting some seconds after the 
opening gun, then the ring-around- 
the-rosy changed to a real mix-up 
lasting three minutes, and there was 
ripping and tearing of wool, result- 
ing in a quiet but decisive victory for 
the plain-clothes men. 



01 LAVAL 

Cream Separator 
Supremacy 

38 YEARS of LEADERSHIP 



OVER 3S yeare trf Kptrtenre •'ml Hi"» 
■and* of t#*t» t h#» world over Urn «■ it"" 
fiimtrated the IH> Laval to !>♦■ the mil 
imiilih ilean ski in ml nu cream M|MI>1 
Buperior eenttructioB throuutumt '*• • K ' 
poMtble greater capacity, cleaner iElniwlw 
and a heavier cream than can he »•" """ 
with any other machine. 

The driving nierrwnlam of the De l*v«l l» 
perfectly oiled and the bowl run* at lUm 
■peed, all of which U conducive to the ' ■■'■•' 
life of the machine. A lie Laval will b* 
from 18 to 10 yeart, while the life '■' 
cream ieparatori average* from 1 to * 
Sot a rear goea h» hot what ao-Be taj**** - 
mint u made in De lJival machines. ■ 
gtone in left unturned by thf I N Lftval I '■ 
pany to insure t,, t-rtt) Df L**Sl "■ 
greatest ptwulble Ml I lei from tils ■ I ■ '■ 

More De Lavalt are aold every *«n 
all other make* combined, ftftd 1" 
uaera are eattofled iwer»— not oftll «!■•• 

muihinc is mm lmt during the uianv ft -•'• 
nt it* life. ^^^ 

The De Laval Separator Co, 

166 BROADWAY » *- JUPIW1 #T 

NBW YORE CHICAOO 



Y. M. C. A. ANNOUNCES 

POLICY OF ASSOCIATION 



At a special meeting <>f the Y. M. 
( . A. cabinet held the Tuesday 
, fore college opened, several funda- 
mental questions concerning llu- 
policy of the association for the 
coming veur were discussed. The 
various chairmen of committee* alao 
Btated their policies fur tfeta year's 
work. 

In order that there might he no 
misunderstanding concerning mem- 
bership in the association, consider- 
able time was spent on this question. 
Finally it was decided that the basis 
of membership which already existed 
hut which was not clearlv understood 
ubould be the one to stand. Thli 
basis is the one called for in the Ci.n- 
gtiliitiou for College Christian Asso- 
ciations as published by the interna- 
tional committee of Young Meu'l 
Christian Associations. The follow- 
ing quotation* are taken from Arti- 
,!, ill. Sections 1 and 2 of the above 
constitution, which has to do with the 
matter of membership : 

••Section 1. — Any man of good 
moral standing, either student or 
member of the faculty, is entitled to 
general membership in the assc. na- 
tion, and may be elected by a two- 
thirds vote of the members present 
:il any meeeting." 

"Section 2. — The active member- 
ship of the association shall consist 
vA those of the general membership 
who are members in good standing 
of evangelical churches or accept 
JtsBi < "hrist as he fa offered in the 
Holy Scriptures as their God and 
Saviour and approve the objects of 
the association. Only active mem- 
bers shall have the right to vote, 
and only active members who are 
members of evangelical churche* 
Khali be eligible for (elective) ollice." 
Both section* are practically self- 
explanatory ; the view of Christ re- 
ferred to in Section 2 i* merely 
toother way of saying that to mem- 
beti accepting such a view, bold Him 
t<> be divine. Thin view is very 
clearly explained by Dean Brown of 
Yule theological school in an article 
in the October issue of the North 
im man Student, under the title of 
Who is Jesus Christ." A copy of 
tliii i« in the library, 

\- was explained at the freshman 
iewi.iinn, membership tickets will he 
i-siM-.i i.i all general members w bethel 
s»« the or not. The holder of such a 
lirket will be granted the ordinary 
privileges granted to any city asso- 
eimion upon the presentation of the 



time to time, it would be well for 
those Interested in the program of 
the association to follow the ('m.i.i.- 
OIAN closely. 



FACULTY LIST HAS SEVERAL 
CHANGES FOR COMING YEAR 



time in observing the larger fruit 
farms throughout the luited States. 
Frederick A, McLaughlin has been 
granted a one vear leave which he 
will use in botanical study at the I ui- 
veiBity of Chicago, 



HUIIM 



urn ii 






the near future, a systematic 

M of those who have already 

I in the college records that they 

" ■inbers of evangelical churches 

made ; all others not included 

group who are not desirous of 

Dg general or active members 

■peak to any one of the officers 

association. 

other decisions reached at this 
rence will be published from 



The opening of the new college 
year finds many changes in the fac- 
ulty list. Several of the instructors 
have resigned since June. Among 
these are : 
Harold E. l'.aldinger. instructor in 

dairying, 
Prank N. Bianchard, inetrnctoi in 

zoology and geology. 
Fiances K. BovntOD, clerk, dtvttion 

of agriculture. 
Phyllis J, Cogswell, stenographer, 

extension service. 
Sidney 11. Haskell, professor of 

agronomy. 
Ksther I. Houghton, clerk, graduate 

school. 
Orion A. Morion, extension profeUOf 

of agricultural education. 
Ralph W. Bee*, extension instructor 

in pomology. 
Henry 10. Smith, assistant profcMOf 

of English. 
Raymond C Smith, assistant in 

botany. 
George E.Stone, professor of botany. 
Vacancies caused by thMfl resigna- 
tions and new positions created have 
lieen filled as follows : 
Windom A. Allen, assistant chemist. 
Stanley C.Bali, instructor in /.oology. 
Evelyn Rrewster, clerk, president's 

office. 
Llewelyn L. Derby, assistant in de- 
partment of physical education. 
Bud Dewar, stenographer, division 

of agriculture. 
Marion V. Doudalc, clerk, gradual.- 

school . 
Harry l>. Drain, Instructor in dairy- 
ing- 
George L. Farley, supervisor of jun- 
ior extension work, 81 Lincoln 
avenue. 
Ktttherine L. Kent©*, stenographer, 

department of dairying. 
Margaret T Gaskell, stenographer, 
office of ths dean and registrar. 
Charles II. Gouhl, field agent. 
Ethel L. Kennedy, clerk, extension 

service. 
Austin D. Kiltaam. extension in- 
structor in pomology. 
George W. Martin, instiHctor.botany. 
Joseph Novitski, assistant in rural 

sociology, 
Charles H l^lteimm, a-«t«taiit pro- 
fessor of English. 
Philip W.l'iiyne.RSilslanl'in English. 
George F. l'naliee, shop assistant, 

rural engineering. 
Everett IE Hucker, instructor in 

puultrv husbandry. 
H-ilpb M/U'it!edge, instructor in 

agricultural economics. 
John T, Wheeler, assistant professor 
of horticulture. 
Prof. Eied C. Sears, head of the 
pomology department has been 
granted Iia^c of absetice until .Janu- 
ary I. Ills'. l |e if » »P* ud ' ,n B llu9 



'15. — "Sty" Farrar was recent ly 
married to Miss Mildred Grout of 
Springfield and. after a short wed- 
ding trip, expects to live in Florida. 



JOHNSON B00KC0, 



KaT*ai.l*HKi> ltfl>2 

Sti;i»hkn Lank Folukk. inc. 

M*Ni'rA«Tent Mi JHW i'; i, i' us 



ISO HKO,\ DYVAY, 



Agricultural Books 

and Filing Cases 



N'KW VOHK | 



<M.m» aistu coi-Moiii: 
I'INS AMI RIKOfl .* 

i.ill.n. SII.VWH ANI> RHONII0 MHOAI.N 



BABBITT & W00DW0RTH 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 




A 




MEN'S STORE 



Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local Agent for 

B. V. PRICE CO., LAMM CO., BKOWNIIMO, KINO & CO., 

Custom Tailor* 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKET SAVES VOU 5% 



M. A. 0. 
•a STATIONERY & 

NYw Design with (Aggie) Sea! Enclosed 

SELLS AT SIGHT 



INK" 



TIMS KKXAIvIv aTORB 



On tl»«- « 'iincr 



J Ml 



More Feed Per Acre 

The cost of producing meat or milk would bt* much 



lett if it r 



-s ;« t> t. 



reduce the teed 



Both t\„-' ./naftt.'.'v ;«i,.| ,/„ahty tA U* !"• ' •! Improve 
when the rigid plant food* are used to suppleim-nt the 
ni.uiure and « li.v.r. They improve enough to yield ft 
handtmu profit on the exjrfiiUture. 

The right plant food include! enough 

POTASH 



r I 



Supplfitiifit tlM ni -iiiuf .nil phosphate 

,.Ui,f Muriate rt Put**!!, or *ao to i"' 



r> , ,»: 



ill r&lM l'i|t L'irii -i 
it t li«* siiii- Oiiic llnpn 



in kVftiUbk for 
with 50 to 100 

I"'"' 

fine cfoter i&i 

thr- fertility ol lb« M& 

P • i-h salfn -ilum- "ft ili«* "•'* ' flriolrthf 1 

Writ. u. for 
r IM u;j. 

OFitW\> KM! HORH5I. lac. 42 Rrn»<w»», N*w Tar 

Ait-Bin, Imm, Mi. Sm Frtawta... IS €*•!*• It 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



E.B.DICKINSON,D.D.S. 



DKNTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, 



Amherst, Mas*. 



Office Hours: 9 to II a. in,, 1-ao to , r > p, m. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

fobbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
ind Fittings for Steam, Water and Gav Asbestos 
and Magnesia Bolter and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - • Holyoke, «m. 



FRESHMAN SQUAD HARD AT 
WORK UNDER COACH GORE 

Not Exceptionally Heavy, but Fast 
Over Twenty Candidates Out 
for Positions. 



NASH BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Agents fur Hex T> pewrilf r 

F. M. CURRAN C. F. DYER 



Candies and Ice Cream 



*' HAMP " 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Keplaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

"iatisfactinn Guaranteed 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



STUDEHTFUBNITOBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 
CARPEfROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post office. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I .iberal Ticket System 1 'el. 3°- M 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, H a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just j step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) SI. BO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes ame-H a pleasant memorv— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best oossible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



HlKltlHtiil II" 1. I. 



HltrlngAelil, M»»», 



TO THE MAN WHO WANTS 

FASHIONABLY TAILORED GARMENTS 

I offer in my high-class tailoring a combination that is irresistible. 

Style That is at once metropolitan and in the best of taste. 

Fit— That is perfect, for I use the best designing and fitting sysiem avail 

able. 
Quality— 'hat is far above the average, for I use only the finest imported 

and domestic fabrics. 
Price— That will pleasingly surprise you by its moderation. 

Buy or Rent your Cap and Gown NOW 

FILL DRESS SUITS TO KENT FOR ALE OC( ASIONS 



Pressing 



Cleaning Dyeing Repairing 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



LABROVIT21 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Btagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY, f**Ol». 

C&rptrvter & Morehousf, 
PRINTERS, 

No. t, Cook Place, 



For the past two weeks candidates 
for the freshman class football team 
have been working out under the 
direction of Coach (iore. Evidence 
of the interest the men are taking in 
their work in furnished by the fact 
that several reported for practice dur- 
ing the week before the opening of 
college. The squad now numbers 
over twenty meu, most of whom have 
had a good deal of previous experi- 
ence in the game. 

The team will not be extraordinarily 
heavy, hut it will be fast. Couch 
Gore expects to build up an excep- 
tionally good baekfield, with Bacon 
and Ball the leading candidates for 
quarters; Cray, Hurd, Mallon, and 
Vigezzi, halves; and Cunde, Dewing, 
and Gorman, full. The kicking 
department will be "the beat ever." 
Bacon, Dewing and Gorwaiz are 
showing up finely at [muting and drop 
kicking, while the former and Vigezzi 
are throwing forward passes in the 
most approved manner. 

The squad now includes the follow- 
ing men, although it is expected that 
a few late arrivals will report this 
week : Bacon, Ball, Bunker, Cande, 
Carletou, Crawford, Dewing, Fuller, 
Gorwaiz, Gray, Harrington. Hurd, 
King, Lent, Lothrop. Mallon, May- 
nard, McGe >rge, MeNulty. Readio, 
Simmons, Talmage and Vigezzi. 

The five game schedule arranged 
bv Manager Chambers will provide 
some hard contests for the freshmen, 
and those on the campus are expected 
to provide good substitutes for the 
varsity games. The schedule : 
Ct , 7_Sufneld school at SufTield. 
Oct. 14— Hartford high at M. A. C. 
Oct. 21 — Worcester North high at 

M. A.C. 
Oct, 28— Monson Academy at M<»n- 

son 
Nov. 2— Holyoke high atM. A. C. 

SEVERAL CHANGES MADE IN 

SYSTEM AT DINING HALL 

I'nder a new management tl e col- 
lege dining hall appear* to be enter- 
ing upon a most satisfactory season. 
Miss Ora L. Kennedy a graduate 
of Simmons college, the manager, 
comes here from ten years of ex- 
perience in running the college com- 
mons at Lewiston, Idaho. Mr. 
Charles Fairbanks, a professional 
head waiter, recently of the Omnry 
House, Boston, has charge of the 
general service. With this manage- 
ment and the new system of hour 
pav for waiters good food and Mr- 
vice is assured. As in previous 
years the policy is to run the hall for 
the benefit of the Htudents, at cost. 
There are at present ">2.'» students 
eating theie. The capacity of the 
hall is 4n0 students, which leaves 
room for inany more to get the bene- 
fits of eating at Draper hall. 



FIRST ASSEMBLY 

(t'ontlnued from page lj 

In closing, President Butterfield 
asked for student cooperation in 
carrying out the rules laid down by 
the Amherst Board of Health in the 
infantile paralysis scare. Even 
minor ailments must be reported to 
Physical Director Hicks at once, and 
students are asked to refrain from 
attendance at the local "movies" and 
to remain in Amherst until aft< i 
Oct. 11- 



DOES COLLEGE LIFE PAY ? 

The following extract taken from 
the Christian Register briefly gives 
opinion of the value of college life. 
Dr. Edward Everett Hale when asked 
50 years after his graduation to write 
a paper on *'How I was educated", 
said of his college life : 

••The good of a college is to be had 
from the fellows who are there and 
your association with them. With a 
small circle of admirable friends of 
whom the world is by no means 
worthy, and to a less degree in the 
various clubs, even in the ranch 
abused debating societies, I picked up 
a set of habits and facilities for doing 
things one has to do, for which I am 
very grateful to Harvard college. 1 
disliked the drudgery of college life 
through sad through. But, none the 
less, 1 ought to Bay. that I do not 
believe that any life outside of college 
has been yet found that will, in 
general, do so much for a man in 
helping him for this business of living. 
I could get more information out of 
Chamber's Encyclopaedia than nnv 
man will acquire, ss facts, by spend- 
ing four years in any college. But 
the business of changing an unlicknl 
culi into a well traiued gentleman is. 
on the whole, more simply and cer- 
tainly done in a good college than 
anywhere else." 



1907 ALUMNI NOTES 

A class reunion will be held at the 
time of the celebration of the WHs 
anniversary of the college next year. 
Watts, Chapman, Higgins and King 
will be in charge. 

G. H. Chapman received the de- 
gree of doctor of philosophy frow 
the college last June. 

The addresses of W. F. Chace ami 
II. P. Pray, -a non-graduate, are in- 
correct as given in the Alumni fog* 
ister published by the college hwt 
spring. The claBS secretary will he 
pleased to learn where these men are 
located. 

A child, Marilvnn, was horn to 
Mr. and Mrs. M*. H. Clark, Jr., it 
Buffalo, N, Y., on July 26, ISli, 

Charles Morton Parker apt! Miw 
Edith Stickney were married M 
struthaiu, N. H., on Aug. I, I' 1 ' 1 
They are living at their new boWfe 
Orchard Farm, at Fiskoale, Bast- 

Manager .1. F. Eastman of lh« 
Broome County (N. Y.) F*OT 
League is leading a fight of the d .iiry 
farmers of that section against tiif 
milk dealers of New York City for 
an advance in the price of milk. A 
boycott is to be started unless XM 
dealers acquiesce. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



THE ENTERING CLASS 

[Continued from PSCS 1 1 



Bunker, Carroll W., 
Burnett, Paul L., 
Burns, Allen M., 
Cande, Robert P., 
Card, Ralph H., 
Carleton, John F., 
Chase, Francis C, 
Clai ridge, Fred W., 
(Imigh, Alfred A., 
Col 



Somerville. 

Leicester. 

Taunton. 

Pittsfield. 

Somerville. 

East Sandwich. 

Roy a Is ton. 

Milford. 

Wollaston. 

Frederick E. Jr., 

South Portland, Me. 

(rafts, Gordon B., Manchester. 

Crawford, Alexander G., Waverlv. 

Crawford, John A., Allstou. 

Daggett, Clinton J., Albany, N. V. 

Davenport, Frank S., Dorchester. 

Davidson, Donald G., Amherst. 

Davis, Orrin C, Belchertown. 

Delahunt, Jno. K., Dorchester. 

Derrick, Glendon R.. Clinton. 

Dewing, Warren M., Kingston. 

Dixon, Harry L., Harrisville, 

Doucette, Charles F., Melrose. 

Douglass, Donald C, Arlington, 

Barley, Miss Marion E., 

West Newton, 



Eldredge, Reuel W., Winchester. 

Farnsworth, Richard W., Lancaster. 

Fuller, Loreuzo, Lowell. 

Golosov, James < >., Roxbury. 

Gorwaiz, Richard IL, Newburyport. 

Graff, Leland S., Reading. 

Graves, Carlisle F., Stamford. 

Gray, Irving E., Woods Hole. 

Gustafson, William N 

Hale, Frank T. C. 

Hamlin, Hazen W., 

Harrington, Harold L 

Haskins, Harold, North Amherst 

Hathaway, Richmond H., Wanen 
Hathaway, Warren S., 
Hereon, Allen, 
Higgs, duo. A., 
Hill, John F., 
Hill, Roy \Y\, East Conway, N. H. 
Hill, Theodore, Jefferson Valley, N.Y. 
Ilillahold. (has. K., Syracuse, Ind. 
Holland, F. Harold, Shrewsbury, 
Holloway, Jno. W., Taunton 

Home, Robert S., Wellesley Farms 
Hurd, Davis A., Wellesley Hills, 
Hurd, Gordon K., Millbury 

Hyde, Kenneth S.. Amherst. 

lotto. Carl, Northampton 



Worcester. 

By field. 

Amherst. 

Lunenburg. 



Somerset. 

Acushnet. 

Wareham. 

Egypt. 




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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 1916. 



Johnson, Alberta, 

Old Westbury, L. I., N. Y. 
JohtlBOQ, Conrad J., Campello. 



J ones Ivl si hi T., 
Jones, Robert L., 
Keene, Wulter VV., 
King, Starr M., 



ltoslindale. 

North Kaston. 

Kusliudnle. 

Pittsfield. 



Lambert, Richard B., Gleasondale. 
Lent, Donald, Maynard. 

Levine, Maurice K., Sherborne. 

Liudquiat, Harry G., Holden. 

Littlefield, John K., Lynn. 

Lothrop, Karl D., West Biidgewater. 
Luce, William A., WeBt Boylston. 
Lyons, Henry K., Rockland. 

Macleod, Guy F., Lowell. 

Mallon, Chas. H., Last Braintree. 
Mangurn, Andrew 11., Holyoke. 

Maples, James C, Tort Chester, N.Y. 
Martin, Lawrence P., Maiden. 

McDonald, Milton C, Peabody. 

McGeorge, Win. 11, Greenwich, Conn. 
McNulty, Raymond P., Amherst. 
Meserve, Albert W., Fraraingham. 
Millard, Helen, Great Barrington. 
Murray, Hairy A.,.Ir., 

Ravnham Center. 
Newell, Philip 8., West Newton. 
Oppe, Herman de W., 

Sandy Hook, Conn. 
OitlolT, Henry S., Ludlow. 

Paige, Joseph C, Hardwick. 

Parkin, Win. H., West Springfield. 

Peckham, William 1L, Newport, R.L 

Phillips, S. Austin, Pittslield. 

Plowman, George T., Jr., Boston, 

Porteck, H. George, Lowell. 

Putnam, Fred H., Natick. 

(Juadland, Howard P., North Adams. 

Readio, Philip A., Florence. 

Redding, George K., Melrose. 

Reed, Morris, Worcester. 

Richards, George H., Springfield. 

Richardson. Mark M., North Dana. 

Huberts, Ivan A ., South Lee. 

Robertson, Win. F., Fratninghara. 

Sanborn, Joseph R., No. Amherst. 

Sanderson, Ralph H. Waltham. 

Schaudelmayer, Ralph K., Marlboro. 

Scott, Clifton W., Buckland. 

Shaughnessy, Howard J., 

Eastharapton. 

Silverman, Joseph, Dorchester. 

Simmons, Lester W., Dighton. 

Smith. Donald H., Pittslield, 

Smith, Fret! G M < Hter River. 

Smith, George A., Whitiusville. 

Smith, Herbert T,, Quincy. 

Smith, Raymond A., Maynard. 

Smith, Raymond N., Plainville. 

Smith, Susan A,, Great Barrington. 
Snow, J no. D., Arlington. 

Steacie, Curtis, Brighton. 

Stedman, Ralph S,, Springfield. 

Stiles, Wm. B., Great Barrington. 
Sullivan, Walter If., Lawrence. 

Sumner, Ralph H., Springfield. 

Talmage, Harry J.. Great Barrington. 
Taylor, Kliot 11.. Shelburne Falls. 
Taylor. Thornton G., Waban. 

Torre v, Converse II , 

Hoosick Falls, N. Y, 
Turner, Alfred W,, Havana, Cuba, 

Urquhardt, John W., Fast Walpole 

Vigezzi. John, Great Barrington, 

Vigezzi, Mary, Gi eat Barrington. 

Ware, Mason. Maiden. 

Waugh, Fred V., Amherst. 

Webster, Milton F., Maiden. 

Willis. Maude E., Amherst. 

Woodward, Ralph. Jr., Grafton. 

Wrighl, Kenneth G., Arlington. 

Wright, Stuart E., Taunton. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 



A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Kconomics 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Economic Botany 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select f 



OUR RULE 



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"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

II, A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
H. E. Bobbin*, Manager 
S. W. Hall, 1'iesideut 
R. L. Holden, Manager 
A. W. Spaulding, Manager 
1). A. Kicker, Mauuger 
M. U. Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
H. Aiken, President 
.1. T. Nicholson, Manager 
E. A. Anderson, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
E. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
I). O. Merrill. President 
E. L. King, President 
C. H. Gould, President 
M. J McNamara, President 



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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXVII. 



C. A. C. FALLS BEFORE 
ONRUSH OF AGGIE BACKS 

Score 12-0. Varsity Shows Up 
Well for First Game. 

M. A. C. wou its first game 
of the season Saturday when it de- 
feated Connecticut Aggies 12-0 on 
Alumni Field. Although the maroon 
and white team had no walkover, the 
Connecticut men at no time threatened 
If. A. C.'s goal line. The home team 
showed up fairly well for the first 
game, the line being a little bit weak 
mid the backfield being almost per- 
fect. Connecticut had somewhat of 
un advantage in having :i veteran 
team while the Aggie team was practi- 
cally green. Furthermore, Connecti- 
cut hail played before this season 
which gave thein a chance to correct 
faults made a week ago. 

It took the maroon and while team 
the greater part of the first half to 
to score. I^oug gains by the backs 
carried the ball down the field and 
Pond carried it over on a 20-yard run. 
M. A. C. scored again in the last 
qnai ter on forward passes aud straight 
rushes. There were many penalties 
so both sides, offside being the fault 
which caused the most of them. 

The spectators were entertained 
helwten the halves by the M. A. C. 
Uepublican Club who staged a parody 
ou the Mexican policy of Wilson. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 10, 1916. 

AGGIE STOCK JUDGERS SHOW INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE 
METTLE AT BROCKTON FAIR HOLDS ITS FIRST HEARING 



No. 2 



FIRST PEHIOD. 

Couuecticut kicked to Day on his 1.5- 
yard line aud he carried the ball buck 
20 yards. M. A. C. made two first 
downs on straight rushing but lost the 
hall on downs by an unsuccessful for- 
ward pass. Connecticut Immediately 
kicked to Grayson who ran it back 2 
yards from mid-field. Another un- 
successful forward pass gave the ball 
to Connecticut and on a fake kiek 
llopwood ran the ball through a 
broken field for 95 yards. Hushing 
and a forward pass failed to gain and 
Hopwood made a try for 11 Held goal 
wlitch went short. Pond ran it back 
about a yard and the quarter ended. 

SECnKO PERtOO. 

Weeks kicked to Hopwood who ran 
it hack 2 yards before he was downed, 
hushes and another forward pass 
failed and Hopwood tried once more 
for a field goal hut failed. The ball 
*as put in play on Aggie's 20-yard 
hue and then began the march for a 

[ < 'itit timed on page 1 1 



Come Out with First Honors arid Two 

Highest Individual Prizes. To 

Judge in Springfield. 

For the first time in its history, 
the stock judging team of M. 
A. C. scored a victory at the annual 
New England stock judging con- 
test, held at the Brockton Fair, 
Oct. 5. The Aggie team, composed of 
dough '17, Moves' 17. and Kinsman 
'17, defeated the teams from Uni- 
versity of Maine, Mew Hampshire 
College, Rhode Island State College, 
and Connecticut Agricultural Col- 
lege. Kight classes of dairy cattle 
aud two classes of draft horses were 
judged. The final standing of the 
teams follow* : 

M. A. C. 2019 

Civ. of Maine 1U.'»7 1-2 
Connecticut 1301 

Rhode Island 1837 1--' 
Mew Hampshire 1 7^1 1-2 
lb-sides winning as a teats, the 
highest individual honors also came 
to M. A. C Ciough making the best 
score, and Moves being a close sec- 
ond to him. This good work won 
for each a gold medal, aud the 
team brought back to the college, 
to be held for one year, a beautiful 
silver cup. This cup is given by the 
Brockton fair management, and must 
be won by a college two years be- 
fore it can be permanently kept. 
The same team, with Dillon '17 as 
alternate, will enter the stock judg- 
ing contest at the National Dairy 
Show at Springfield, Here they 
will meet with hard competition from 
team* representing colleges scattered 
over the country as far west as Iowa. 
Although Professor Mi-Nutl, the 
Aggie coach, is not sure of winning, 
he savs the team will certainly make 
a good showing, and **»! the men 
who beat tbem will have to be ex- 
ceptionally good. 



Departments Report on Their Branch- 
es of Work. Citi'ens Argue 
Piu i.nd Con. 

After a more or less extensive in- 
vestigation of conditions existing at 
M. A. C, the committee appointed 
by the governor for this purpose. 
had its first hearing Wednesday. 
Although it is rumored that there is 
some criticism because solid geome- 
try, French, etc., arc taught besides 
agriculture there is k<> far no author- 
ity for such absurd criticisms. The 
session, lusting from 10 to 12 in the 
morning, and from 2 to ."> in tie after- 
noon, was presided over by Dr. L. 
Clark shelve, chuirmau of the com- 
mittee u nl former presideut of Smith 
college. During this time the heads 
of the departments set forth the work 
of their respective branches. In the 

afternoon i number of prominent 

Aim. isl eni/.iu.i .-.poke in favor of 
the college and its work in the state 
and voiced the general opinion that 
the ....liege is under-Hiippoited. 

Those who spoke favorably from the 
colb e point of view were Dr. C. S, 
Walker, C. B. Klder. Uev. S. Paul 
Jefferson, Kred S. Allis and K. A. 
Thompson. 

Those appearing before the com- 
mittee were W. D. Hurd of the ex- 
tension department, Dr. W. I'. 
Brooks of the experiment station, Dr. 
C.K.Marshall of the graduate school, 
and Dean Kdwaid U. Lewis. 



SOPHFRESHMAM BASEBALL 
In a snappy six-inning baseball 
game Saturday afternoon the sopho- 
mores beat the freshmen by g seme 
of i't-2. The two left-handed pitch- 
ers. Qutmby and Crafts showed up 
fairly well, but both were off form. 
The freshman catcher, Newell, was 
the star of the contest. 



RIFLE CLUB NOTICES 
At a recent meeting of the Rtte 
Club, Samuel F. Tulhill M7 of Malla- 
poisett was ekeied president of the 
club and Franklin IF Caidetl "l« was 
elected captain of the rifle team. 
Rifle, practice for freahmen began 
Monday and will continue throughout 
ll,e week. All freshmen intending to 
try out for the rifle team must report 
at the range at the drill hall some 
i time this week. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

Owing lo the increased OQBt Of 
manufacturing news print paper 
the printers of this publication 
have been obliged to raise their 
contract price to ?."><) an issue, an 
increase of 110, In order there- 
fore to avoid a deficit of 1300 at 
the end of the current year, the 
CotXBAlAN board has voted to 
raise the annual subscription price 
from ll.nO to $2.00. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 
TO OPEN OCTOBER 13 

Five Positions Open on Editorial 
Board, Three on Business. 

Weeent action by the Coi.i.kcjian 
hoard has changed materially the 
rules for this year's competition. 
No positions will be Open to fresh- 
men on the editorial department, 
there being Instead two places open 
for junior* and three for sophomores. 
The object is to interest those men 
who plan to major in journalism with 
a view to improving the style of the 
writeups. Students taking journal- 
ism will enter the eompelitiou on the 
same basis as others, their Collkuian 
Copy receiving credit in the journal- 
ism department. Another change to 
be noted is in regard to reports of 
specches(repriut work). Credit will 
I a; at the rale uf one point for seven 
inches, but no more than one |R)int 
vitl tit given for SB} DM sepoi't- 

In ihe business department one 
place is open to sophomores to fill the 
vu anev caused by the resignation of 
Ceoige ( .t ampbell Mi). Two places 
are now open to freshmen this year 
leading respectively to the positions 
of business manager ami advertising 
mauagei in their senior year. The 
rules follow ; 

1. Candidates shall be voted on 
during the first week in Maich by the 
members then holding olllce. A two- 
thirds vote shall be necessary for 
election. 

2. The competition shall open at 
midnight on Oct. I "2, ID 16 and shall 
end at midnight on March 1, 1917, 
ami to become a candidate for elec- 
tion each competitor must have 2f) 
ixniits to his credit before the ck»» 
of the contest on March 1. 

3. To be eligible to compete for 
the editorial board a candidate must 
have handed his name in to com- 
petition editor, Milford R. Lawrence 
M7 before Nov. I. ID 16. All can- 
didates for the positions of assistant 
advertising manager or circulation 
manager must have handed in their 
name* to business manager Merrill 1*. 
Warner M7 before Nov. 1, 1910, in 
order to be eligible as competitors. 

4. Points for the competition may 
be gained as follows: Those com- 
peting for positions in the editorial 
department will receive one |»oint for 
each seven inches of original copy 

U'.tftttBttad .in pftfs i J 









The Massachusetts Collegian.STuesday, Oct. 10, 1916 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 



3 



OVER 120 MEN TRY OUT FOR 
PLACES IN MUSICAL CLUBS 

Several New Features, Including 

Hawaiian Specialty. Warren 

Working on Lighting Scheme. 

The management of the Musical 
clubs feels highly elated over the 
prospects for a successful season. 
The tryouts for the various musical 
organizations was most gratifying; 
GO men reporting to Prof. Blgelow 
for the glee clubs, SO for the orchestra 
and 30 for the mandolin club making 
a total of 120. This is indeed a high 
percentage aud is a remarkable tribute 
to the progress of the Non-Athletic 
Association. Prof. Higelovv especially 
remarked on the excellent quality of 
the voices and had hard work to pick 
the 92 men who finally were retained. 
Of course it will be a worthy struggle 
now for the men to keep their places 
and the management wishes it to be 
understood fully that only those who 
attend strictly to rehearsals will be 
taken on the trips. The mandolin 
club is playing several new specialties 
for the season. < >ne will be a 
Hawaiian instrument specialty. It 
will consist of two steel guitars ac- 
companied by six ukuleles. They 
will play Hawaiian music only, So 
far as is known no other college club 
has before used this feature and with 
the present day trend toward 
Hawaiian music this number is sure 
to be successful Another specialty 
to be attempted is one suggested by 
Bou '17. An electrical contrivance 
is being constructed by H. M. 
Warren '17 that will illuminate the 
drum heads of banjos and banjo- 
mandolins. The lights in the hall 
will all be turned out and the illum- 
inated instalments will play negro 
folk songs accompanied by humming 
from the glee club. The music starts 
slow and quiet as if heard in the 
distance. Gradually it grows louder 
and louder till maximum is reached 
then begins to diminish until B nalty 
it censes. It is thought that these 
two specialties and others still in the 
formative period will help make 
this a most successful war. 



HUGHES MEN HOLD GRAND 

RALLY SATURDAY NIGHT 

Hughes' supporters will hold a big 
rally Saturday night. There will be 
a parade, with a brass band and 
torches, from the center of the town 
t<» Stockbridge Hall. The principal 
speaker will be ex-Senator Ward. 
There will also be several student 
speakers and one or two from the 
faculty. The townspeople are in- 
vited to attend the rally as well M 
the students. The republicans ex- 
pect that their demonstration will 
put a crimp in the spirit of the Wil- 
son supporters. Officers of the club 
»« president. Mutt rick '17, vice- 
president, S. S.Smith'iS, secretary. 
Km me rich '18, treasurer, Hathaway 
'If, 



BIG PREPARATION FOR 

NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

In Springfield October 12-21. Fine 

Chance for Men Interested 

in Dairying. 

The following letter has been re- 
ceived from the committee in charge 
of the great national dairy show 
which is to be the big event of the 
year in New England. 

"The 1916 National Dairy Show 
will be held in Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, from October 12 to 21 in- 
clusive. The association has come 
east this year to get togeth r in 
•sunny New England,' the greatest 
national show of dairy cattle, and 
dairy products and machinery that 
has ever been held anywhere in the 
east. 

The railroads throughout the 
country are giving excursion rates, 
and one of the railroads of the South 
is making every effort to induce the 
farmers of our southern states to 
attend this show. 

Regardless of the 'apt;' and 'downs' 
in the dairy business, these men see 
that dairying is one of the great in- 
dustries of the nation, and .will be 
still greater within the next few 
years. 

Over 1500 head of cattle of the 
leading breeds will be on exhibition, 
and this alone would repay anyone to 
visit the show to make a comparison 
upon the relative merits of these 
cattle. 

Practical experts on feeding and 
breeding, and proper direction of the 
farm, will explain these topics daily. 

The I'uited States Department of 
\griculture will give yon daily visible 
demonstrations of the relative value 
of cows. 

50,00<> square feet of floor space 
will be given over to exhibits, which 
will include the most modern ap- 
pliances that a dairy farmer, an ice 
cream manufacturer, a buttermaker, 
a creameryman, or anyone else 
connected with good farming or dairy- 
jug needs in his business. 

A country milk bottling establish- 
ment, and milking machine de- 
monstrations, tee cream operating 
machinery, buttermilk, cream and 
cheese exhibits from all over the 
United States will be a part of this 
great show. 

Those interested in any of these 
bustneMes, or that expect to enter 
them, will save money by attending 
this show, thereby getting the latest 
iip-to date Information. 

For farther particulars write to the 
Manager, W. K. Skinner, Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. And for hotel 
arrangements write to the Convention 
Bureau, Board of Tr,ade, Springfield, 
Massachusetts.** 



SOPHS WIN ROPE PULL 

Forty feet of brand new rope was 
the best the sophomores could get 
for a margin of victory over the yearl- 
ings iu 15 minutes of the hardest 
work either class has yet done this 
year, in the annual sixty-man rope 
pull held Friday afternoon. Not a 
man on either side went into the 
water, but there was nary a one who 
was not drenched. 

Owing to the stretching of the new 
hawser both Bides pulled in several 
feet at a jump, and for the first five 
minutes of the struggle the sopho- 
mores plainly had the advantage. 
Then the tide turned slowly but 
surely to a surprising freshman spurt, 
by which the first year men recovered 
a considerable amount of lost prop- 
erty, even though they were forced 
to huddle up in a bunch at the water's 
edge for a while in order to avoid the 
dip. It has been claimed that the 
l!)2o men were aided by the old-time 
stunt of swinging the rope against a 
tree, but others say that it bothered 
both teams alike, rather than helping 
either. However that may be, the 
fact still remains that for the final 
five minutes, approximately, there 
was practically no gain at all for 
either class, the sophomores retain- 
ing but not increasing their slight 
advantage. 

The null had been postponed from 
the previous Friday because six years' 
similar abuse had caused the old rope 
to break twice in the earlier attempts. 
Better weather than in the previous 
week brought out the customary large 
attendance. 




Cox Sons & Vining 

73 Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
floods 

for all Degrees 

CIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. MatMchutetta 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



The Beat Place to nine 

GOOD FOOD 1- KOI- BR I V I'KKI-AKKIi 

All Kind* of Sea Food 

60-oent Luncheon from 11-30 toS p.m. 

Special DUhei at All Hour. 

R. J. RAHAR. Prop. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that if the boys want 

to have their shoes tapped 

with the best quality of 

leather, drop in 

and see 

J. GINSHUWC 

1 1 l / 2 Amity Strett 



The MIcfoMoIogy club will bold a 
meeting in the trophy room Wednes- 
day, Oct. 11, at 7 p. m. All juniors 
majoring In microbiology are urged 
to be present. 



UPPERCLASSMEN ELECT 

NEW CLASS OFFICERS 

Class officers in the three upper 
classes for the first term have been 
elected as follows : 

Seniors. 

Almon \V. Spaulding of Newton 
Highlands, president; Joseph F. 
Whitney of Brooklyn, N. Y., vice- 
president ; John T. Dizer of Rust 
Weymouth, secretary ; Samuel F. 
Tuthill of Mattapoisett, treasurer ; 
Edmund B. Hill of Rutherford, N. J , 
captain ; .lohn M. Hauler of Tur- 
ners Falls, sergeant-at-srms. 
Juniors, 

Roger W. Weeks of Hvde I'nrk, 
president ; Lewis W. Spaulding of 
South Iliugham, vice-president ; Oli- 
ver G. Pratt of Salem, secretary; 
Harlan N. Worthley of Greenwood, 
treasurer ; Stephen M . Richardson 
of Montague, captain ; Robert L. 
Boyd of Lynn, sergeant-at-arms. 
The class historian will be elected 
by competition. 

Sophomores. 

Allan L. Pood of Holliston, pres- 
ident ; Miss Olive E. Carroll of Dor- 
chester, vice-president ; Miss Helen 
A. Sibley of Longmeado w, secretary ; 
Arthur M. McCarty of Monson, treas- 
urer ; Roger F. Readio of Florence, 
captain : William Kimball of Orange, 
sergeant-at-arms. 



The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKF'S LEADING HOTEL 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 




For Greatest 



Dm 



DOUBLE SERVICE 
Automobile Tins 

Surttrt 7J0Q mm ftrtw 

Absolutely 



rww Mmutm - 



SToKm 



double the Uuekaeai of U» tm% 



WSSTtBfn? 



inch M 



D<S MffVlCfc 
BUM Of toW* 



U«£3 



roMwf 



ecomrjorer rough endrugced road. M J* J 
m on hard paremeata. TberawMeaayildlB* 
and resilient aa any oilmr pnenmatlo Ure-wa 
air space and pressure being the fiao. ,. 
They arc tbe moit e&mmn thai and "Gmrnr 
tirea made and are used wnrretlre»8*utt bady 
ponded on and tl wtt©BMe«CftlllloU>*to^•J*«2• 
»^anyZ>ou^<«£^rt)««Wrlet^n<*a^elnl»«>lnUi« 

V. 8. goremment and Buropean War ••"J'S 



88*4 In. II ; 



IS US M 

.„ln. 13.75 8.20 
83x4 In. 16/75 ISO 

prlcea. a 10 ^discount •Howttf on 
two or more Urea. All 
pewonal checks mult bo 

irea nowsni 
-jrfttwlrTerj 

lute. Sold direct 



Urm TiNs 

!* «ei la 

ittl 




to the consumer on I y. 
ftMft. H'rttt/ortt. 





FRESHMEN LOSE FIRST GAME 
TO FAST SUFF1ELD SCHOOL 

Atliotigh the freshmon foot-hall 
team pat op ■ game swap against 
the Suffleld boys Saturday they were 
beaten l»v a score of 33 to o. The 
last year's champions of Connecticut 
srliool-boy teams kept tht-ir reputa- 
tion, and at one lime only, in the last 
period, «li<l they begin to fear tint 
the Aggies would score. The work 
Of MeKenna was, notion I>1, the lu*st 
on tin- Conn, team, in that he matte 
a great number of end runs of from 
|n t,, .in yards, beside the gaius he 
made from fake kick foi mations. 
The losers' star man was Dewing, 
who made many feature plays, some 
of which all but mateiiilized in 
touchdowns. With a little more 

practice, this being the Kreshtuea'a 
first game while the opposing team 
hail previously played two, the Aggie 
••fiosh" should he ahle to show some 
of the pep that 1919 did last year 
Tin- line-up: 

MHHM'-i lliiol. M \s- \i OIKS, H»2U 

\ tan. Cliiisloli.li. le re, Lent 

>|,i«i.|. II "■ Uorways 

tiling,, Lather, Iteaeh, l^ n<. Bunker 

UhImtisoh, «• e, Talmachfe 

y ; »l,.. i>, II;. We;olio, McCloml 

... wiUoii, ii h, Kiiia 

kulatt, Hani Alcorn, Si. < aldwell, ri- 
le (4 ray, bothrop 
Mi ■Keiina. "|l» 'I 1 '. Ball, Menioii. Hall 

H ( Hklwell, Ibb rill.. Y'me/zi 

I.H.niin. Hi). Ihh, Dewing 

('raHs, J>» "' Mall"" 

SMni Mitiiei.l. :w. AKfffea, HW, 0. 

Touchdowns— MeKenna :i, ('rafts, 
ra.l<lw«ll, Deals from touchdowns, 
u .Ih-mmimi :(. Ueterea Be*ehof 8prlti«- 

II, hi ( ollesie. I'm|iire llnn<:est rgcr 4ti 

spritijiiififl <'i,lli«!»«'. Head linenman- 

PslMf, Time - l.">, 12, 15, 12 minim 

j.clii.il*. 

CHARACTER RECORD TO 

BE KEPT BY COLLEGE 

An lnnnnncement l»y Dean I^ewis 
in Wednesday assemhiy that caused 
gnat interest among the students 
was that the college is now keep- 
ing an accurate account of the char- 
acter of each student. These rec- 
ords are made up from reports sent 
in hy the different instructors, and 
will 1)0 used to refer to when iu- 
miiries are made regarding students 
who may be under consideration for 
positions. A few of the things in- 
cluded in this idea are class records, 
general ahilitv and remarks about 
pOTBonalitv, In four vears a fairly 
good idea of a man's character 
should he gained hy this method. 

Y. K. 0. A. TO MEET THURSDAY 
A song service and discussional 
meeting will constitute the first Chris- 
tian Association meeting this year. 
i f will he in the Old Chapel on Thurs- 
day evening at 8-80 o'clock. Ques- 
tions up for discussion »re: — Should 
wtiide speakers conduct most of the 
niMftinpf Should local leaderm? 
Should students or professors? 
• s li"nld it be a prayer meeting or 
lecture, or both? What constitutes 
» live interesting meeting for s 
1 -sHan Association, 



NEW FACULTY RULES CHANGE 
CUT SYSTEM FOR HOLIDAYS 

There are a few changes in the 
faculty rules for 1916-17 worthy of a ! 
second citation. 

Owing to the confusion of acquired 
credits resultiug from the installation 
of the three term system in place of 
the two semester system, the majority 
of the senior class would graduate 
at the end of the second term. It is 
to he clearly understood, however, 
that no senior, except posBihly in a 
few cases, will he graduated until 
he lias satisfactorily passed his third 
term work, no matter how many 
credits he has earned previous to this 
time. 

The rule requiring ahsences twenty- 
four hours hefore aud after holidays 
to he counted double has heen 
changed to: "ahsences immediately 
ami consecutively preceding and fol- 
lowing a holiday, recess, or v cation 
announced in the published calendar 
shall lie counted as double". Under 
the new ruling only the absences fol- 
lowing the last class attended pre- 
vious to the holiday's aud the ab- 
sences preceding the first class at- 
tended succeeding the holiday's will 
be counted double absences. 

Attention is called to the rule that 
a senior who is conditioned in any 
course or courses of his third term, 
senior year, may have a condition 
examination, provider! that he take 
this condition examination before 
the last Faculty meeting preceding 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



Wc are sole agents (or the Kcvcisiblc Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college nun, f r om $1.50 to $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Chase of New Haven Hats, fr< in $3.00 up. 
THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

keady-to-wear Clothes for young men from Aitcibinv System lillh 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Madr-to your-mcasuie Clothes, fnnn $25.00 i'P 

Mr, Campion personalty *up« i lutein's to tiii'm: MR 
this department aid is .in expcit in the ttU*n«*S, 

Onk OF TBI BEST Cusiom Taii-'h-im- Pki'xk imi-s is in iiii- Siaii 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS GLOVES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



Commencement 



REVISES CONSTITUTION 

Collegian Board Vote« to Make Man- 
aging Editor Senior Position 
Following the example of many 
other college publications, the C"i.- 
LKQtAK iKiard has so amended the 
constitution thai beginning with the 
class of lt»19 the position of manag- 
ing editor as well as that of editor-in- 
chief will be hcl'i by a member of the 
highest ehii*<» on the board Itoth 
(heae offices Will be voted for after a 
rear'i competition, during whi.h 
each junior will take his turn at head- 
line writing, proof-resdiiig and the 
writing of editorials. Every man 
taken on the board in the spring of 
hi» sophomore year will therefore 
have an equal chance to become edi- 
tor-in-chief when he becomes a 
senior. 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always ^liid to see- yon- 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR lorty yeari we have tendered faithful iwvke. For lofty 
ye«r« we have tried to make each year'* ier*ke more nearly 
ideal. Thii untiring eMorl hai built lor ui not only IV Wotl.J'i 
Largest Mail Order Seed Buanew, but alio a World Wide 
reputation for Efficiency and undbputed leaderdup The 

Fortieth Anntferwry Edition of Burpee'. Annual, tkm 
"Leading American Seed Catalog" i» brighter and 
better than ever. It i» mailed free. A poalcatd will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Building. PWWelphie 



F*«tt:«*^ (Atioe Sto 

Largest Slock— Low r»t Prices 
Expert Repniriiitf-Hewt lentlier iim«l 



WILSON CLUB ORGANIZES 

At s meeting of the Wilson < lub 
hebl after assembly Wednesday, 
Richard W. .Smith' 17, of Fittsfleld 
was elected presib-nl. The other 
officers art; Ti«.president, Louis 
W. Bom '!"♦ of Arlington s secre- 
arv. Lewis T. Bm-knmn "17, of 
Wilkw Btuns, Pft , searjtenHl- 
irms, John M. *»uur '17. of Tur- 
ners Falls. Much eathosi«m was 

r^^rritt 1 ;! Dry and Fancy Goods and choice Family Groceries 

looked for at the meeting to be held 
this Wednesday. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-IiKALKRS IN 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O LAM'HKAK'18, M'tfin? Keillor 
Ml I. FORI i R. I.AWKKNCK '17. Assistant Editor 
WILLIAM BAVII.I.E, JR. '17. Alniiml Editor 



Abbociatk Editors. 

john t. m/.kk '17 

josei'h f. whitney '17 
frank j. bin kb ii 

NATHAN W. OII.I.KTTK '1* 

EDWARD N. MITCIIKI.I. 'IK 
EI.IOT M. HI'KKI'M '19 

MYKTON f, EVANS '19 

BUSINESS DKPA KTM ENT. 

MEKRILL P. WARNER '17. Uusinesi Manager 
JAMES C. POWELL 'IS. 

Assistant Hnslnrss Manager 
BIKOER R. ROM KOI 1ST 'In. 

Advertising Manager 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the Itusiness 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aiaernnd-rlaM matter at the Amherst 
Po«t Office. 



he noticeably improved. We cannot REGISTRATION FIGURES 

too forcibly impress upon prospec- 
tive competitors the importance of Total Enrolment but Little Less 
quality and promptness as deciding than Last Year, 

factors in the competition. Many a Exclusive of the graduate school 
good write-up has in time past been and a few students who have been 
useless because handed iu too late, admitted on probation, the total en- 
and in the same way, many a prompt robnent of the college for the pres- 
piece of copy lias been spoiled by ent college year is 002 as compared 
hurried, careless work. The board j with a registration of 616 in the 
needs men who will cover what they , respective classes last yeai The 
aie told, and who have enough inter- class of 11*17 is but little smaller than 
est in journalism so that they take the senior class of last year, most of 
pride in doing good work. For such l the decrease being accounted for by 
as these, membership on the board j tin- smallneas of the entering class, 
offers ample reward in the shape of 
journalistic experience, reporting 
trips with the various teams, ban- 
quets and the like. We are hoping 
for a gold number of capable embryo 
journalists to enter the competition 
and st. -iv with it to the finish. 



a 



BIDE-A-WEE 



>> 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

j Our Specialty— And other good things to tat 
MRS. L. M. 5TEBBIN5, 

j Middle street, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. 415-W 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKGI I All NI'NOW -KKVICK AT 7 P.M. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



the reason for which 


is unex 


dainahle : 


Comparative figures : 






IBM 


IBM 


Seniors, 


108 


104 


Juniors, 


1 10 


138 


Sophomores, 


162 


172 


Freshmen, 


•_'ii 


isa 


Unclassified, 


2.'. 


30 



Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Oct. 10. No. 2 



No other event of the year will 
draw so many men from different 
agricultural colleges together as the 
National Dairy Show, which opens 
this week in Springfield. Here will 
compete the stock judging teams of 
all the state uriversities fiom as far 
west as Kansas and Nebraska, to 
say nothing of our own eastern in- 
stitutions. We express the hope 
that some of these men will find oc- 
casion to visit M. A. C. and that 
when thev do come thev may find 
here a truly hospitable welcome on 
the part of the student body. 



2-10 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[\..i i..-H for this column should be dropped in 
at the (on. Km an office or handed to Nathan 
W.Olllette '1« on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding; each issue. I 

Wkiinkm. \i . <». i. 11. 

m. Vssembly. President Ken- 
yon L l.iittrrliciil. 

TnURSIi \ v <»< i . 12. 

Afternoon half-holiday. Co- 
lumbus Kay. 

m. v. M. < . \. Old Chapel. 

m. Florists ami Hardeners 
Club. French Hall. 

N\ n i:i.\v, n< i 14. 
m. freshman football 

\ i. Hartford High 
bent, 

m. Varsity football. M. \. r. 
vs. Dartmouth ai Uanuv&r. 

ttepublUan lially, Stock- 
brides Hall A adtiorinm. 



Totals, 



r.ic. 



fi02 



CLUB MEMBERS ON TRIP 



7-IMI p 



2-:!il i' 



l!»20 
Ain- 



;{-imi 



7 -HO iv m 



Wk have received several inrpiiries 
of late as to whether the Coi.lkoian 
is henceforth to appear twice a week. 
Such a proposition as contemplated 
last spring would, we believe, ma- 
terially improve the paper, but we 
regret to say that a semi-weekly 
publication is a financial impossibil- 
ity this year. On the advice of the 
director of the non-athletics associa- 
tion the board has voted to devote its 
energies to the improvement of its 
office facilities, which are now woe- 
fully inadequate. The twice-a-week 
idea has not been dropped for good, 
however, and will again be taken up 
as soon as the financial condition of 
the board and the demand for rhauge 
warrant it. 



We respectfully call the attention 
of the student hotly to the rules for 
the Collegiah competition as ap- 
pearing in another column. By 
eliminating freshmen from the edi- 
torial competition the board has arbi- 
trarily made itself a strictly junior- 
senior organization, in the belief thai 
by encouraging men majoring in 
journalism to compete, the newsiness 
and general style of the paper will 



ON TO DARTMOUTH IS 

SLOGAN FOR COMING WEEK 

Saturday's game with Connecticut 
Aggies gave ihe M. A. C. eleven 
their first real test, and while the 
team did not show real midseason 
form there were many pleasing feat- 
ures which make the prospects of a 
good game with Dartmouth very 
bright. 

The work of Pond in the backfield, 
Sauter at center and Day and Gray- 
son on the ends was especially notice- 
able, while Boles and Weeks in the 
backfield look good for consistent 
gains. 

Both Weeks and Pond are improv- 
ing iu their punting game and both 
are getting good length and form in- 
to the kicks, 

Dartmouth's easy win over Leba- 
non Valley last Saturday gives very 
little ground for comparison as they 
will find a very different proposition 
before them when the M. A. C. 
litres tip next Saturday. The team 
is confident of a successful week, 



Second Prize Winners to Visit Col- 
lege on Way to Dairy Show 

A peaceful invasion of the campus 
will take place on the evening of Oct. 
1 1 when 40 boys and girls from all 
over the state come here as guests of 
the extension service. The occasion 
is the annual free trip of the second 
prize winners of the boys and girls 
clubs of Massachusetts. After be- 
ing entertained in Amherst Wednes- 
day night, the young people will take 
an automobile ride Thursday morn- 
ing over the Mohawk trail to North 
Adams, where dinner will be served. 
An afternoon lide is planned through 
Pittsfield and over Jacob's Ladder to 
Springfield, where the party will at- 
tend the National Dairy Show. All 
necessary expenses will be taken 
care of without cost to the club mem- 
bers, and chaperons will be provided 
to accompany them from their homes. 



Northampton 



FLOWERS AND Pi ANTS 

Grown by the Floricultural Dtpt. 

We offer our surplus stock of rut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stork 
is grown in modern houses undei 
ideal conditions Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and swet-t 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

l>I#>iihoiif MOO 



MASS. 



MASS. — 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



Black and White 
Black and White 
Black and White 

CIGARETTES 

Strikingly Superior... 



HENRY ADAMS ® CO. 
The Rexall Store - 



'10. — Myron Haxen was married to 
Dorothy L. Helherg at Brooklyn, 
New York on the 10th of August. 
They will be at home after October 
12 at Piske Terrace, Oeean Avenue 
and Avenue H, Brooklyn. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Tufts Largest Ever 

Registration figures recently given 
ont at Tufts College show that insti- 
tution to have an enrolment of 1725 
students, a gain of nearly 200, 
More than half of this number is 
comprised of students in the dental 
and medical schools in Boston, which 
together have a registration of 98fi. 
The colleges on the "Hill" in Med- 
ford show only a moderate growth, 
having this year 44n in the schools 
of liberal arts and engineering, as 
against 408 last year. 
Brown Herald to Celebrate 

Invitations have been sent to 17H 
former members of the editorial 
hoard of the Brown Daily Herald to 
attend the 25th anniversary of the 
founding of that publication on Dec. 
2, Among those who have signified 
their intention of coming is Charles 
B, Hughes, Jr., a member of the 
Herald board for three years. A 48- 
page number of the paper it planned 
to celebrate the anniversary. 



DE LAVAL 

Cream Separator 
Supremacy 

38 YEARS of LEADERSHIP 



OVER s* year* of experience and thou- 
sands <>l tests th«" world over hair cicm 
otwtrmted tfc« Im Laval to lw« the only thor- 
ninthly Hean skimming ctNB ■■paraier, 
Superior ronatrurtton throughout make* 
possible greater capacity, cleaner «kiiniiiiti« 
ami a bearler cream than can lie »ei inrrf 
with anj otter machine. 

The driving nierlaintani of the De Laval it 

lierfectls oiled ami the bowl run* at «i»« 
■peed, ai! of which li conducive to the Ir.ng 
life of the machine, a 1m» Laral will tat 
fro* 1ft toao years, while the life of 'tn«i 
cream separators average* from i to A rmtm. 
Sot ,i vear goes by Imt what Mure impiinc 
input i» made in I>e Ijnal machines, anil m 
utone is left unturned hr the He Laval < <"i' 
pany to Insure to every be I .aval u§<*l tfc« 
weateat possible service from hta mai-hiii'-- 

More He l.4n hM are wild every year than 
all other makes i onitiined, and l»c I ■■' l! 
iiwi'i* are satliilied users- not nnh W0#H tl.»- 
in.li lilne i* new hut during the man* jcafK 
of Its life. 

The De Lava] Separator Co. 



iw Broadway 

NEW YORK 



m K, Maoism m 

CHICAOO 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

1 Continued from page lj 



accepted, one point for each two 
hour period spent in otlice work. One 
point will be given for reports of 
speeches, etc., not exceeding seven 
inches in length. Excess matter 
will be accepted, but without credit. 
Assignments will be in charge of 
Milford R. Lawrence '17. Material 
handed in will be conected and grad- 
ed by him in conjunction with the 
department of journalism. All copy 
must be written on one side of the 
paper only. Copy coming in late 
will receive no credit whatever. 

it. The number of positious open 
in each class is, in editorial depart- 
ment: 11)18—2, 1919—3, in the 
business department, 1919 — 1, 11)20 
2, 

('.. Credits for the business depart- 
ment are gained as follows, one point 
for two hours work. Advertising de- 
partment : one credit for two hours 
work, one credit for 94. Q0 new ad- 
vertising or $8.00 renewed advertis- 
ing. 

7. The board reserves the right 
to withhold election in either depart- 
ment, editorial or business, if in its 
judgment the poor work of any one 
group of candidates justifies it. In 
such t:tse the competition for 
vacancies will be in charge of the 
new board, after it has come into 
otlice on March 15. 

Further information and instruc- 
tion may be had from the heads of 
the several departments. 

WAITERS NOW GET MORE 



Threatened, Strike at Dining Hall 
Brings Increased Pay. 

Contending before the Senate that 
on a basis of 20 cents an hour a stu- 
dent waiter at the dining hall could 
not earn his meals, the waiter's repre- 
sentatives Tuesday night asked for 
U increase of pay. A committee of 
the Senate took the matter up with 
treasurer Kenney who granted the 
men an increase to 25 cents an hour. 
The time charts now kept at the din- 
ing hall famished proof that no 
waiter could earn his board under the 
present system and a strike would 
have been the result had not the 
men's terms been complied with. 



RAVINE TO BE WILD GARDEN 

A wild garden with rustic bridges, 
footpaths, and massed plantings, is 
Uie ultimate aim of the department of 
landscape gardening in the long 
neglected ravine between the chemis- 
try building and Flint Lab. The 
natural scenic advantages are many, 
liicimiiiig a small brook with level 
lanr! on both Bides and sloping side 
iHiiika giving excellent opportunity 
fat muss planting and further develop- 
ment. Already much of the land has 
twen cleared, some paths have been 
•an! out, and nursery estimate* have 
h«n made. The department hopes 
to get ail of the trails done this fall 
wd have everything ready for spring 



INTERCLASS ATHLETIC BOARD 

Representatives to the interclass 
athletic board have been elected as 
follows: 1917, Robert S. Holes of 
Dorchester aud Emory K. Grayson of 
Milford ; 1919, Hall B. Carpenter of 
Sotnerville and Paul Faxon of West 
Newton; 1920, Kenneth S. Hyde of 
Amherst and Starr M. King of Pitts- 
field. The class of 1!M7 is the first 
senior class to be represeuted on the 
interclass athletic board. When 1917 
entered college "Kid" Gore took 
charge of freshmau athletics and be 
evolved this idea of having an inter- 
class board rather than th^ cumber- 
some individual class boards. Now 
the system has been completely 
worked out as each class is at present 
represented on the board. 

CONTEMPLATE CHANGE 

IN ELIGIBILITY RULE 

It is probable that iu the near fu- 
ture the eligibility rule of the college 
will be so modified as to permit fiesh- 
men to enter non-athletic activities 
from the beginning of the year As 
the rule reads now. first year men are 
not eligible to participate in college 
activities of any sort, except fresh- 
man football, uutil the third term. 
In a recent faculty meeting the gen- 
eral opinion was expressed that non- 
athletic activities, such as dramatics, 
musical clubs, debating and the like, 
should b^ thrown open to freshmen 
throughout the year. 

President llutterfield. Dean Lewis 
and Prof. H. K. Robbins, general 
manager of the non-athlelici associa- 
tion, were appointed a committee to 
consider the matter, and definite ac- 
tion will probably be taken this week. 



THE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Little Known but Important Work 
Conducted at County Fairs. 

How large a part the college plays 
in the work of the small county fairs 
is but little kDOwn to any outside the 
extension service. For several years 
this department has sent exhibits to 
various fairs throughout the state 
with the purpose of demonstrating 
better agricultural methods. A new 
plan tried out this year consisted of 
an exhibit of eight cows from the 
vicinity of the fair, on which the milk 
production records were known. 
Farmers visiting the exhibit were 
asked to place the cows in order of 
their production and on each after- 
noon the reaults of the judging were 
posted. In addition there was a 
pountry exhibit and a form manage- 
ment exhibit, each conducted by the 
college. 

Prof, 1- . I). Waid of the extension 
■ervice had charge of the party which 
concluded its lastexhibital the Brock- 
ton fair last week. Harold G. Dickey 
*17 was a student assistant in this 
work . 

Kdward S. Russell, postgraduate, 
announces the birth of a daughter, 
Marv Whittaker. 



CONFERENCE ON RURAL 

ORGANIZATION OCT. 16-17 

The seventh annual conference on 
rural organization will be held iu 
Amhei'Bt Oct. 16 and 17. The con- 
ference will endeavor to develop a def- 
inite working policy among the rural 
interests of the state. Monday, Oct. 
10, K. T. Hartman, secretary of the 
Massachusetts civic league will pre- 
side aud the following men will speak : 
President Kenyon L. Butterfield, Dr. 
A. E. Cance and Prof. K. L. Mor- 
gan. Tuesday, Oct. 17, Prof. Wil- 
liam D. Hurd, director of the exten- 
sion service, will preside and the 
speakers will include S. R. Parker, 
M. A. C, C. C. Carstens, Massa- 
chusetts society for the prevention 
of cruelty to children and R. W. 
Stimson of the state hoard of 
education. 



FLORICULTURE NOTES 

A perennial garden with over .">0(i 
species of plants represented is the 
the present feature of the floriculture 
department. This garden has been 
in constant bloom throughout the 
whole season and florists from us far 
off as Philadelphia have been here to 
study it. The classes in floriculture 
are now making a systematic study 
of the fall blooming plants, noting 
especially the habits of growth and 
value to the garden. 

C. K. Wildon '16 has taken the 
position of assistant In floriculture, 
left vacant by the resignation of 
A. S. Thurston who has gone to 
Ames, lown, as assistant professor 
in floriculture at the Iowa Agricul- 
tural College. Professor Thurston 
received his M. Sc. from M. A. C. 
last June. 

Plans for a bigger and better fall 
flower show are well under way and 
the date for the show will be an- 
nounced soon. Several special feat- 
ures are being planned and the de- 
partment of floriculture is assured 
the hearty support of the North- 
ampton and Holyoke Florists' and 
Gardeners' Club. In connection 
with the show of this latter organiza- 
tion to be held in Northampton Nov. 
1 and 2 a special class in basket ar- 
rangement has been made for M. A. 
C. students. 

The first meding of the M. A. C. 
Florists' and Gardeners* club will be 
held next Thursday evening (Oct, 
12) in room K French Hall at T 
o'clock. All students of floriculture, 
aa well as any one at all interested in 
the subject, are invited. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

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Good work speaks for itself. 



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•71.—H. McKean teller, fruit 

glower, near IUgerslown, Md., S. 
Bruce teller of the same class, non- 
graduate, is in the real estate busi- 
ness in the same city, aud another 
brother. W, M. Zeller ex-*74, is a 
farmer neat* Santa Barbara, Cal,, 
Route I. All three of the brothers 
have a lively interest in the work of 
the college, although it is years since 
they have all been together. 



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Newsdealer and Stationer 






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6 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 



f 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
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Offlre Hours ' 9 to Vi a. ni.. 1-30 to 5 p. in. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
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from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) SI.5U and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



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More Feed Per Acre 

The cost of producing meat or milk would be much 
less if it required less acres to produce the feed, 

Both the quantity and quality of the feed improve 
when the right plant foods are used to supplement the 
niniure and cbmr. They improve enough to yield a 
kandsamt profit on the expenditure. 

The right plant food includes enough 

POTASH 

in available tutm, Supplement the manure an 1 phosphate 
with 50 to 100 |H.uiids of Muriate of Potash, or aoo t>» 400 
piunds of Kainit, per acre, and you will raise big corn ai.d 
fine clover after the grain and at the same time httpfure 
the fertility of the soil. 

Try Potash wits alone on the swamp land pasture and note the 
clover and B"<» I gnsm crrrwd out the wild hay. Write ui for 
prices of Potash, one bag up. 

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Huntington Ave,, Exeter and Blagden St.., Boston, Mass, 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY 



1910 NOTES. 

Myron S. Hazen, President of the 
Coe Mortimer Fertilizer Company, 
baa just edited an attractive booklet 
entitled "The Neglected Hay Crop." 
The booklet contains some very use- 
ful information, some fine illustra- 
tions, and creditably advertises the 
Coe Mortimer Fertilizer. "Bill." 
Johnson 1910 is vice-president of the 
same company. 

Dr. Samuel C. Brooks began his 
duties the first of this month, as a 
Physiologist Research man, at the 
Institution of the National Dental 
Association, 8803 Euclid Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

John Blaney senior partner, firm of 
Blaney & Blaney, Landscape Archi- 
tects, 6 Beacon street, Boston Mass. 
John has several big jobs on his 
hands at present and several others 
heading his way. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 



CONSIDERING HOLIDAY 
President Butterfield is consulting 
with Dean Lewis this afternoou in 
regard to the proposal of the Senate 
that a holiday be granted the stu- 
dents in order to attend the National 
Dairy show in Springfield on Friday. 
In view of the fact that Thursday 
afternoon is a holiday and a holiday 
for the Tufts game is also contem- 
plated, the administration has some 
hesitancy in granting this additional 
request. Announcement regarding 
the proposal will be made at as- 
sembly. 



DEATH OF PROFESSOR 

BASSETT IN HARTFORD 

Austin B. Ilassett, a graduate of 
Williams college in 1 880 and professor 
of mathematics at M. A. C. during 
the academic years 1882-1884, died 
at a hospital in Hartford on Oct. 5, 
as the result of injuries received in 
an automobile accident at Lyme, 
Conn. Oct. 2. 




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ALUMNI NOTES 

'09. — A second son, Robert Chapin, 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. II. J. Neale 
of Worcester on June li. 

'14. — D. A. Coleman received the 
degree of Master of Science in He- 
search from Rutgers college last 
June, his thesis being "Environmen- 
tal Factors Iurluencing the Activity 
of Soil Fungi." Coleman is also 
joint author of "Sources of Error in 
Soil Bacteriological Analysis." Both 
papers appeared in a recent number 
of "Soil Science." 

'14.— G. R. Reid is manager of 
the Peckham Floral Company, Fair- 
haven, Mass. 

•15.— E. A. Wilkins has recently 
accepted a position in the retail flor- 
ist store of F. E. Palmer Inc. at 
Brook line. 

'16.— S. W. Hall has charge of a 
greenhouse section on the range of 
Goddard, the carnation specialist, 
at Framingham. 

•16.— Tyler S. Rogers is taking 
poet graduate work in Landscape 
Gardening at Harvard r diversity. 



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PBorotOB Bassett is IBHB 

After leaving M. A. C. Mr. lias- 
sett studied theology and for three 
and one-half years was paBtor of the 
Williamstown Congregational church. 
which service was followed by a pas- 
torate at Ware of 14 years. In the 
autumn of 1905 he entered upon his 
duties as professor at the Hartford 
theological seminary and was also 
made secretary of the seminary, posi- 
tions which he held until his death. 
While in the ministry he gained 
for himself a reputation as a lecturer 
on certain phases of religion, which, 
it is understood, resulted in his re 
ceiving the call to Hartford. 

He was induced to come to Aggta 
by Dr. Paul A. Chadbourne, then 
president of the college. Professor 
Bassett prepared a delightful sketch 
of the life of President Chadbourne, 
who died while in office, Feb. 28, 1*83. 
Mr. Bassett has preached at the col- 
lege several times since he entered 
the ministry. 

Members of the classes of IW8- 
1887 will recall his winsome person- 
ality, his high ideals, his genuineness, 
and his interest in all that was best 
in the life of the student. He was 
the peacemaker when disturbances 
occurred in the life of the undergrad- 
uate body. 

Austin B. Bassett was the true 
type of a Christian gentleman, and 
his many fine traits of character un- 
questionably impressed themselves 
upon the lives of those who Itaii 
the privilege of being his popils. A 
genuine lover of men has Hvtd ftt 
life temporal and has entered into 
the fuller life Eternal. 



.1. B 



Walter I. Cross 'If of Hingham 
has pledged Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Send in 



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8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1916. 



1 
1 



M. A. C. WINS 

I Continued from ptgS 



touchdown. Long gains by the hacks 
ami penalties put tbe ball on Con- 
necticut's 80-yard line and Fond car- 
ried it over on tbe next play. Cap- 
tain Grayson failed to kick the goal. 
Connecticut kicked to Day who ran the 
ball hack to his 43-yard line. A 5-yard 
gain by Weeks through center and t 
forward pass, Weeks to E. Grayson, 
brought the ball in the danger zone, 
but the ending of the half prevented 
another touchdown. 

IIIIKK PERIOD. 

Connecticut kicked to Day who ran 
it through a broken field to his 85- 
yardline. Straight rushes and a for- 
ward pass, Weeks to Pond, brought 
the ball to Connecticut's 85 yard line 
but on the next play Clark recovered 
Weeks' fumble. Connecticut fum- 
bled on the first play, Day recovering 
the ball and carrying it 10 yards 
before being downed. Connecticut 
now began to hold and recovered the 
ball on downs, when a forward pass. 
Weeks to Pond, failed. Hopwood 
punted to Mack who ran it back 10 
yards and the period ended with the 
ball in the middle of the field. 
rOUOTH PSBIOD, 

On the first play Connecticut was 
penalized 15 yards for coaching on 
the side lines. Repeated gains by 
the backs carried the ball to Conneeti 
cut's 10-yard Hue and Weeks carried 
it over. Captain Grayson missed the 
goal by a close margin. Connecticut 
kicked to Richardson and he was 
downed after a 10-yard run. Two 
forward passes failed and Weeks 
kicked to Hopwood who was downe ' 
almost in his tracks. A forward 
pass netted 30 yards but the game 
ended before the visitors could score. 

The lineup : 

M. A. < . 

K. Gray w»n, hi 
Holmes, ll 
Knauldhig, iviii. I« 

raj, M»«|iilre, Murphy 
.Hauler, c «•. </u'niii 

lllunrliurd, Cg iff. Strong 

Kdwartls. llairelsiein. rt 

ll, lileUHiHI 

Hay, Kh'lutrilwm, re le, Dirklnaon 

F, llraysun, Wrilllh-, Mack, oh 

(|l», llo|>WOO(l 

I'uihI, IS.irhitiiiii, Blane hard, Hilt 

rli I*. MH'arly, Sunlit 
Bellas, Moynlhaii, rbli llib, Clark 

Weeks, ll. fb, Seliaefer 

Score - M. A. ('. li, Connecticut 
AffKies u. Touchdowns — I'nml, Weeks, 
Tunc 12-iiiinu(e period*. Uelelce 
Carpenter, Unpin Klynn, Meat! 
linesman Kennedy. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Oilers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Economies 



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For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



COm 'I'HTT. 
IV. UVHII 

ri . New marker 



Associate Alumni, 

Joiut Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics. 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'tl Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

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Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association. 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister bolsters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seveuteen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

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Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
11. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
11. E. liobbins, Manager 
I,. T. llucknian. Piesident 
R. L. llolden, Manager 
|{. D. Huwley, Manager 
(). S. Flint, Manager 
M. It. Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams, Manager 
I). M Lipshires, Manager 
F. W, Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
1). O. Merrill, President 
E. L. King, President 
L. T. Buckuian, Presideut 
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S COLLEGIAN 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



HEAVY GREEN ATTACK TOO 
STRONG FOR AGGIE ELEVEN 

Varsity Greatly Outweighed. Dart- 
mouth Team Work Par Ex- 
cellence. Score 62-0. 

Although putting up a gitinc tight 
against heavy odds the II, A. C 
eleven succumbed to Dartmouth Sat- 
urday by a score of U"2-0. The Han- 
overians, veteraus of three games 
and averaging ten pounds a man 
heavier than the Maroon team, had 
the game in their own bands from 
the beginning. 

FIRST 1)1 AUIKI: 

Dartmouth kicked off to Pond who 
carried the bull to the 20-yard line. 
After two futile attempts to break 
through Aggie fumbled, recovered 
and was forced to kick. With the 
hall in their possession Dartmouth 
started for Aggie's goal line but were 
forced to kirk because of a penalty 
f«>r holding and an Intercepted for- 
ward pass. M. A. C. returned the 
kick from almost under their own 
goal posts. liy a change of tactics 
the Green team made 16 yards on 
two line smashes. Two end runs 
failed and another line plunge gained 
Dartmouth first down. A moment 
later she scored hei first touchdown 
by a quarterback run around right 
end. The puut out for position was 
fumbled. Score G-o. 

(Jrayson kicked off, Oerrish re- 
turned the pigskin to mid field. 
After little gain by a skin tackle 
play and end run Dartmouth gained 
2,"» yards by a long forward fol- 
lowed by another gain through 
tackle for the second touchdown. A 
successful punt for position ami a 
kicked goal brought the score to 18- 
0. The quarter ended when Holes 
made the l.'i-vard line on Dart- 
mouth's kickoff. 

SKOOTtti Q.UARTKR 

Following a little gain M. A. ( ". 
kicked and Dartmouth by two runs 
around right end made a third touch- 
down and kicked the goal. Score 
2i 1-0, 

Following her kiokofl Aggie 
tightened up and at a fumble by 
Dartmouth recovered the ball and 
wicked out of danger, but Dartmouth 
brought the ball back to Aggie's 6- 
yard line. At the next play the ball 
went over the line for another touch- 
down and a kicked goal brought the 
•eons to 27-0. 

iuutiimed on pace *.'| 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 17, 1916. 

CHARLES H. CL0UGH '17 1 1NTERCLASS CROSS COUNTRY 

WINS $400 SCHOLARSHIP MEET TO COME SATURDAY 



Has Highest Score in Judging Jerseys. 
|Noyes Places Third. Nebraska Gets 
First Honors in Total Scoring. 



To Finish During Freshman Gamp, 

Good Nucleus for Varsity Squad. 

To Elect New Track Captain. 



Competing against seventeen other Hani practice inns are fast round- 
agricultural colleges from Maine to j ing the M . k. C. cross country teams 
Kansas the Massachusetts stock judg- 1 into good form. With Carpenter 
ing team took fifth place in the stu- ; eligible, Lyons showing an improve- 
dents* contest at .the National Dairy | melit over lasl year, and Schwartz 
show Friday, Charles II. Clough '17 running in his old time form, there is 



of Dedham won the 6100 scholarship 
offered by the American .Jersey Cat- 
tle club for the highest individual 
score in judging .Jerseys. His work 
was largely instrumental in bringing 
to the Aggie team the sweepstakes 
cup offered by h<* same association 
for the highest team score in this 
class. 

Middle western colleges took first 

honors in total scoring. Nebraska, 
with 3682 out of ■ possible 4800, won 
first place, and in addition the cup 
ottered bv lli** iioisiciii-Fricsiaii as- 
sociation. Other leading teams scored 
as follows: Kansas 3574, Iowa State 
8330, Missouri 3494, M. A. C. 348f. 
< >f the Other New Kngland colleges 
New Hampshire placed sixth. Maine 
ninth. Rhode Island fourteenth, Con- 
necticut fifteenth and Vermont six- 
t.iiith. New Hampshire won first 

place OH Ayrshires, Kansas on 
Guernseys, Massachusetts on Jerseys 

and Nebraska on Holsleins. 

The highest individual score of all 
four classes of cattle was made by 
W, T. Robert! of Nebraska, who 
was awarded the sweepstakes schol- 
arship of SIOO offered by the De 
Laval Separator company Nebraska 
carried off three other cups as well. 
the Iowa Dairy Separator scholarship 

of $400, the Hoatd's Dairy mini cap 

iind the National Dairy show Clip. 
The SI00 scholaiKliip^otb-ri'd by the 
Holstein-Fik'siiiri association went to 
Joseph Lee of North Carolina. 

[( .iflltteiP'l i"i !*!«<' *) 

NOTICE TO COMPETITORS 



■ strong nucleus around which to 
build the team. .Much interest is 
being shown bv the new men who 
have reported and Manager Flint 
expect* to iind some good material 
among there. 

Tin- annual inteiclass meet will be 
held Saturday afternoon. The finish 
is planned to come bet ween the halves 
of the freshman football game, either 
on Alumni held or on the road behind 
the grand stand. This run is ex- 
pected to help in the development of 
the rarsitj men by providing MNM 
teal competition, and a large entry is 
hoped for. 

The election of a captain of track 
to take the place of .1. Dixon Ibrcb- 
ard, who has left college, will prob- 
ably be made next week. 



FIFTY LOYAL ROOTERS MAKE 
JOURNEY TO DARTMOUTH 

Fifty or more "royal rooters" 
lauded in Hanover last Saturday in 
time to nC the Dartmouth game, and 
form a loyal Aggie cheering section. 
The journey wan made under vary- 
ing conditions, some going by train 
others by auto, and others by un- 
known methods. On the way back 
one machine succeeded in leaving 
the road and dropping over l bank, 
to the discomfort though not injury 
( jf the occupants. Most of the 
machines arrived back Saturday 
night and the other students came in 
Sunday. 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION WORK 

Tin- Connecticut Valley colleges 
have established an office at M.A. C. 

The Coi.i.i <. i w Board wish to *n- 1 for university extension courses and 

Don lice that there are two positions {ectnTM Theee extension courses 

on the buiiness department open to lllM j lectures are offered in co-opera- 

■QpbofiioreH instead of one. as an [j (>n with the .State Hoard of ednea- 

nounced last week. TheM lead di- tj 1)r ,, to individuals and groups of 

rectlv to the positions of assistant teachers, ministers, and others who 

business manager and assistant ad- desire instruction in any of the arts 

: vertising manager in the junior year. ,„ sciences. 

Further particulars may be had on particular information will be given 

aiM»!iciitiou to the business manager, bv writing to the Committee on Cni- 

Mcrrill 1*. Warner, S South college, versity Kxtension, Ik»x 4, M. A. C. 



No. 3 



SECOND HEARING ON M. A. C. 
INVESTIGATION IN BOSTON 

Opposition Claims College is Classical. 

Several Interesting Statistics. 

Alumnus Defends Courses. 

Severe criticism of the college was 
offered in good measure at the second 
hearing conducted by the appointed 

committee mi investigation in Boston 
Friday. The familiar cry was again 
raised, in regard to the alleged small 
percentage of men going into practi- 
cal farming alter graduation, particu- 
larly by William M Noble of Newton, 
representing the Mr. Shirley who at 
the legislative committee hearing last 
winter, made a crude attempt at 
sensation by charging President Hut- 
lerfield with murder. Mr. Shirley 
also claimed to represent tax-payers 
who pav S'ioOO a year, ami he gave 
figures to show that very few gradu 
ittl return to the farm. 

Mr. Noble said that in the last five 
veais. out of 415 graduates, li'.'t hav< 
liecome farmers in Massachusetts, 
II outside, and In this state there 
were onl\ di in all pursuits relating 
to the farm. These farmers, he 
claims, have coat Massachusetts 

127,000 apiece. President IJutter- 
lleld gave figures in connection with 

recent graduates djrectlji and strongly 
contradictory to Noble's statements 
In these figures the president showed 
that Hbout GO per cent, of the college 
graduates for .*»0 years were in agi i 
cultural pursuits, and in the last ten 
years the proportion Iiiim Increased. 
About HO percent, of recent gradu- 
ates me iu agricultural vocations. 
President Hutterfield atated several 
reasons why no more men entei agn 
cultural occupations, chief MBOflg 
which were the indfeased demand fur 
specialists in agricultural teaching 
and Scientific boards connected with 
this work, and more particularly the 
unavailability of neceesan capital f< r 
starting in farming immediately aflei 
graduation, ll is unavoidable, In* 
stated, that there are always some 
who are drawn <•!! to olhei things. 

Special refutation of Mr. Noble's 
claims was also emphatically made by 
Isaac Coleman, M. A. ('. '13, from 
personal experiences since his gradu- 
ation. He denounced the idea that 
students ought to spend lime silking 
and plowing, anil all together made 
**a ringing defense of the college 
policy, ridiculing powerfully the men 
who wanied narrow farm training." 



uuritei; 













The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



Dr. David Snedden, former head 
of the board of education, told of the 
tendency of New England agricul- 
ture to rise at the present time, after 
a somewhat distinct decline since 
1845. Only specialists and men 
educated to the calling can succeed, 
he said. He believes that agricul- 
tural education should he more and 
more practical. 

George H. Ellis of Newton, a 
trustee of the college and member of 
the legislature for the last seven years, 
urged the employment of experts to 
investigate agricultural colleges in 
other states. 

In addition to the members of the 
investigating commission the follow- 
ing men were present: Professors 
Brooks, Hurd, and Foord and Treas- 
urer Kenney of the college. Trustees 
George W. Ellis, Frank W. Gerrett, 
Charles H. Preston and James VV. 
Bacon, also Prof . Davis R. Dewey of 
the Institute of Technology. 

The next hearing will be held in 
Springfield Thursday at 10-30 a. m., 
in the Administration building. 



FRESHMEN WIN SLOW GAME 
FROM HARTFORD HIGH TEAM 

In a closely fought game, the M. 
A. C. freshmen defeated the Hartford 
High School football team on Alumni 
field Saturday afternoon, 7 to 0. 
The score was made in the third quar- 
ter when rushes by the 1920 back 
field brought the ball from near the 
middle of the field to the Hartford 
10 yard line. The latter held for 
two downs, but two successive tushes 
by Mallou and Cande put the ball 
over the line and Dewing kicked the 
goal. During the last quarter Mart- 
ford made game attempts to tie the 
score, and gained considerable ground, 
but the freshmen tightened up, 
spoiled numbers of forward passes, 
and put up a good enough defence to 
hold their advantage. 
The score : 

M A. 11. niKHIIMKN. l(AKTKOltl) II. s. 

l-<'iit, re U-. Steele 

Kin*,', rt li. Dodge 

McLeod, «'arli't«in.f J utlimp,rif In, Wright 
Taltuadkje, c <•, Dunn 

lleadio. Hunker, Fuller, |g rjj,Mreeuberg 
GonratE, H rt, Vordlund 

firay, lleadio, le re, Weltner 

Vigezzi, Uacon, Hull, qh qb, Hubert 
Mallon,rhb ihh. Davit* 

Dewing, lhl> rhb. Newton 

Cande. fb m, Meal! 

ton M. A. < . 11*20 7. Hartford U.S. 
0. Touuhown — Cande. Goal from touch- 
down— Dewing. Referee Kenney. I in- 
pire— Buttrlek. Head linesman — Ma- 
ginuta. 



HUGHES MEN RALLY 

Torchlight Procession Precedes the 
Speeches in Stockbridge. Much 

Enthusiasm. 
The political fervor of the coming 
election invaded the M. A. C. campus 
last Saturday evening at the time of 
the Hughes rally in Stockbridge hall. 
Before the program a number of loyal 
enthusiasts paraded to the center and 
returned, with drums, torchlights, and a 
large Hughes banner. The attend- 
ance at the rally was lessened by the 
number who made the Dartmouth 
trip, but about 75 gathered for the 
occasion. The speakers were David 
Butlrick '17 president, Henry J.Burt 
*19, Kelsey '17 and ex-Senator Ward 
of Shelburue Falls. Mr. Ward spoke 
on the "Wilson Administration and 
State Rights." 

Arrangements have been made 
with President Melcher of the Am- 
herst college Hughes club for the M. 
A. C. club to assist in the Amherst 
college rally. The Hughes challenge 
to the Wilsou club for a debate on 
"The Tariff" has not been accepted 
as yet. 



INFORMAL DANCE ORDER 

For the benefit of those who are to 
attend the first informal dance, Oct. 
St, the order of dances is given here. 



1 


one Step 


in 


One Step 


2 


One .step 


a 


One Step 


:\ 


Waltz 


12 


Foxtrot 


4 


Koxtrol 


13 


Waltz 


I 


One Step 


14 


One Step 


« 


One Step 


15 


Foxtrot 


7 


Foxtrot 


10 


One Step 


8 


One .Step 


17 


One Step 


9 


Walt?, 


il 


Walt?. 



THE DARTMOUTH GAME 

[Continued from nage I ] 

Boles received Dartmouth's kick- 
off and carried the ball to the 20- 
yard line. A fumble Dartmouth 
recovered but were held for downs. 
After one smothered play aud a loss 
on an end run Aggie kicked. Dart- 
mouth made nothing on receiving the 
ball but immediately tore off two 
long gains by right and left end runs 
respectfully, and by a plunge through 
center the hall weul over the line 
again. Goal kicked. Score 31-0. 

THIRD yt'AKTKK 

At this point Aggie made a rally. 
Dartmouth returned the kickoff by a 
long punt down the field. Aggie 
was penalized for offside ; then made 
a good gain around right end. Noth- 
ing was made on the next attempt 
and M. A. C. kicked to the middle 
of the field. In the next play Dart- 
mouth was thrown for a losa of al- 
most five yards. Aggie's intercept- 
ing a forward pass forced Dartmouth 
to kick. A good gain was made on 
receiving the ball, then M. A. C. 
was penalized for offside. Two 
more gains were ripped off the right 
tackle, followed by another around 
left end. More ground was gained 
through center when a fake kick lost 
the ball to Dartmouth on downs. 
By a long end run two skin tackle 
plays and a line smash the ball went 
across the tine for Dartmouth's sixth 
touchdown. Gerrish kicked the goal 
and the score changed to 41*0. 

The Green team received Aggie's 
kickoff and moved in to their 45-yard 
line, than kicked. A few minutes 
later Dartmouth intercepted a for- 
ward pass on the 25-yard line and 
made her seventh touchdown, follow- 
ing it by a goal. Score 48-0. 

M. A. C. kicked off to Dartmouth 



who returned the kick only to recover 
the ball in the next play on a fumble. 

FOURTH ol'AltTKK 

At the beginning of the fourth 
quarter Dartmouth fumbled twice, 
the second time M. A. C. recovered 
the ball only to kick a minute later 
Dartmouth made first down on a skin 
play through left tackle. After a 
long end run Aggie recovered the 
ball on another fumble and made 
gains on end runs by Pond and Moy- 
nihan. Aggie kicked. By a series 
of end runs the Green team scored 
another touchdown, which with a 
goal gave Dartmouth 55 points ad- 
vantage. 

The Maroon team kicked off. 
Dartmouth tried two forward passes, 
the first intercepted and the second 
caught by Pond. After a gain 
around left end Aggie kicked aud a 
35-yard run gained Dartmouth her 
final tally. A successful kick gave 
the Green team a 62-0 victory. 

The line-up : 

l> AUTMOl'TII M. A. < '. 

DusHOBoit, Cogswell, le 

re, Day. ttebardsoa 
Uealy. StoiTB, It rt, Kdwards, Mlam-liard 
Neeley, You nostrum, ljr rg, Dunn 

Glie, Cunningham, Baxter, c 

c. Banter, Roberts 

Merrill. Mather. Marrows, ry 

lg, gpauldlng, Petit 

Kevan, Hunts, rt It, Holmes 

Emery, P. SicDoaoujrb, Austin, re 

le. E. Grayson 

< aunell.s. Molltrook. MeDonoupb, qb 

qb, F. Grayson. Mack, Whittle 
Thieischer, Ponder, llil» 

rhb. Holes, MoYiiib.au 
Gerrish, U. Bolbrook, rhb ihb, Pond 
Iiuhaiuel, Lehman, fb lb, Weeks 

Score -Dartmouth 92, M. A. ('. 0. 
Touchdowns— C'aiinell, Thieischer i, S. 
Ilolbrook, Gerrish 8, K. Uol brook it, 
Fonder. (Joals from touchdowns -Gel 
rish 0, Thieischer 2. Referee— Melirai h 
of Beaton, Cmpire — Burleigh of Exe- 
ter. Head linesman — Courtney at 
Lafayette. Time — 12-minute periods. 




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AGGIE BUTTER JUDGERS 

PLACE 7TH AT DAIRY SHOW 

In the butter judging contest held 
at the National Dairy Show vester- 
dav, the M. A. C. team finished 
seventh out of the nine colleges 
entered. Pennsylvania .State college 
had little trouble in carrying off most 
of the honors as their team won $305 
out of 4500 in prizes offered. Penn. 
State placed men in the first three 
positions and they all finished within 
ten points of each other. William 
W. Thayer '17 of M. A. C. finished 
in tenth place in the individual scor- 
ing. The M, A. C. was composed of 
William W. Thayer, M. J. McNamara 
and Albert B. Loring, all of the senior 
• •lass. The team scores were as 
follows : 

Penn. State 2791 

South Dakota 3511 

Vermont 2543 

Connecticut 2529 

Cornell 2474 

N. H. State 

M. A. C. 2255 

Ohio 

Nebraska 



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Announcing that il the boys want 

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HOLVOKK'S LEADING HOTEL 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1,25 



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\ \RSITY READY TO TACKLE 

HARVARD ON SATURDAY 

\, xi Saturday tbe Harvard eleven 
will tr\ to get its revenge for the 
siimriae the M. A. C. footliull team 
ani'UOS OB them lust rear. There 
,ii' two Factera which the Harvard 
fans consider in figuring their pros- 
pfcta for a I tig Crimson success. 
|'he fust is that their team is iinder 
stimulus of :i defeat at the hands 
,,f the Tufts team, ami the second is 
that M. A. ('. seemed extremely 
weak in the Dartmouth game. In 
f ;M .f Harvard looks forward to the 
jBrtte tOoat «''»nfitlentlv. and has 
even mnouneed that the second team 
will start the match. The score of 
She M A ('.Dartmouth game is no 
. ju of the Aggie team's strength 
1 mvever. This was the first strong 
ttttiii that the M. A. ('. eleven has 
faced this year. The game was no- 
ti.eat'le for » lack of team work, but 
individual players showed consider- 
ihle ability. The coming week of 
training might to develop the team 
intu the same smooth running ma- 
chine that faced the Crimson players 
1 )*' year. Aggie fans predict thai 
though Hiit vnrd's second string men 
start the mutch they will not finish 
The probable lineup for M, A. 
('. will he: Captain K. GfHViWS half- 
i.nk or end. Day and Uichatdson 
en> Is. Rd wards, Holmes and Hlanch- 

ai«l tackles, Spaulding, Dunn and 
Petit gtiiirds. Satitei and Hnbetts 
i, uter. !•'. Gr ray son, Whittle or 
Mack quarterback, Boles, Pond, 
Movuihan halfiuicks, Weeks fullback. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB DRAWS 
IT PLANS FOR COMING YEAR 

){ ; g on Judging Teams. Discus- 
sion of Barbecue. No Meeting 
Wednesday. 

\t a recent m eeti n g of the Stwk- 

tuitlge clu'i several notions of inter- 
est to the student bodv were passed : 

1 . That a tax be levied as formerly 
bv voluntary assessment by ineml)er» 
ih> membet i, 

.* That students not members be 
irwligibtt t«» competition on Judging 

l":i!I.S, 

'■ That the final date on which 
membership may be taken shall ha 
:t!T'Uiged between instructors con- 
< ■•iiiul and officials of t!ie Stockbridge 
chiH. 

In supporting the above recotnmen- 
ilifiiiis the committee wishes to .uiug 
fiirward the following facts: 

1. That a college course is never 
fifen primarily to train a competitive 
teaa, 

That it is not sound education 

to allow stutlents to receive benefits 

fl iervice in which they do not 

s. part. 

fl. Since the Stockbridge club has 

«n tli.' pant advertised, developed and 

toted the judging competitions, 

is that any nienjber of a eom- 

• team it receiving benefit 

" Hie work of the club. For this 

- "ii it seems that tbe aliove recom- 



mendations are logical and sound. 
Finally, the committee is of the opin- 
ion that a distinctly poor sp< rting 
spirit is shown when men are not 
willicg to join a club until assured of 
a place on a competitive team. A 
spirit of this kind should be discour- 
aged in every way possible wherever 
it manifests itself. 

A discussion followed, during 
which the following side lights on 
the policy for the year were brought 
up. The organization is to continue 
as last year, the sections of pomol- 
ogy, poultry, dairying and animal 
husbandry to hold separate meetings 
on alternate Wednesday evenings, 
while the club as a whole meets the 
Wednesday of the week not occu- 
pied by the section meeting. 

The section meeting will lie led by 
a member of the department rep- 
resented, and matters of a practical 
nature, dealing with that particular 
major, are to be discussed. 

Outside speakers have been secured 
for several of the general meetings, 
men who loom large iu the field of 
agriculture, and who will bring before 
the members many of the problems 
which confront the American farmer. 

Due to the National d*trv show iu 
Springfield there will he no meeting 
of the Stockbridge club this week. 

Prospects of a barliecue for this 
fall were discussed, and no suitable 
time was found available. The stu- 
dent body is assured, however, of a 
distinctly novel and rousing •'tiiue" 
during the short course term, the 
plans of which are already in the 
process of formulation in the heads 
of certain Stockbridge club members. 



EXPERIMENT STATION HAS 

EXHIBIT AT SPRINGFIELD 

The effect of lime, humus, and in- 
oculation on alfalfa are some of the 
things which the experiment station 
is showing at the Springfield Dairy 

Show under the exhibit of the Massa- 
chusetts Alfalfa Growers Association. 
The effect of lime on alfalfa is esp« -ci 
ally interesting as shown iu the series 
of experiments. While no definite or 
verified conclusions have been drawn 
the crop results go to show that 
alfalfa grown in soil one half to three 
quarters neutralized bv lime does 
much belter than alfalfa grown in 
perfectly neutralized sweet soil. 
The results of liming. Up to a three 
quarter neutralized soil are very evi- 
dent in the increasing crop growth 
ami yield. 

Fight distinct vatieties of slfalfa 
which are grown in this state are also: 
being shown by the station. 

Asa part of the dairy exhibit hid* j 
pies of turf taken from the North 
Amherst station plots sie being shown 
to give an idea of the relative results 
of top dressing with various quanti- 
ties and kinds of fertilizer. Even a 
I casual glance will show the great dif- 
ference in texture and quality of the 
sod canted by ths different Irest- 
m »nta. 



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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



I 
I 



Tilt MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the StinleutN of the M.'MHachu- 
sciis Agricultural Collage. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

RICHARD W. SMITH "17. Kdltor-tn-ihlef 

MAMOIAI.LO. I.AM'HKAIl'Ia, M'irinu: Kditor 
MILPORD It. UWKKM K 17. Assistant Kditor 
WILLIAM SAVTLLK. .lit. '17, Aluinul Kditor 



Assim i ati; Kmtokm. 

JOHN T. IMZKIi '17 

JOBKCH K. WHITNEY '17 
FRANK ,1. KINKS 'I* 

N ATIIAN \V. l.ll.LKTrK '1* 

IPWABP N. MIT< IIKI.L 'I* 
Kl.IOT M, HIT IIM '19 

MYRTON K, KVANH 'IH 

BUSINKSK DKI'A UT.MKNT. 

MERRILL V. WAIJNKRI7. Uusinemi Manager 
JAMES C. POWKLL 'I*. 

Assistant lUiaineM Manager 
BIRGER R. ROSKQITST Ms, 

Advertising Manager 

Subscription H.60 per year. Single 
copies, 6 cents. Make all or«ler« paya- 
ble to Merrill l\ Warner. 

In ease of change of aililress, miI>- 
Hcribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered »»■■•• I i-i.'iss matter at the A inherit 

I'Oat Office 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Oct. 17. No. 3 



Although the competition editor 
lias n«>t as yet been overwhelmed by 
applicants who wish to try out for the 
editorial hoard of this publication, we 
feel there are some memheis of the 
junior and sophomore classes who can 
spare the relatively small amount of 
time required to he a successful com- 
petitor in a field which offers so much 
in the way of Journalistic experience. 
( bir appeal is directed largely to those 
juniors who at present are not en- 
engaged in other activities and who 
would therefore be able to devote 
their spare time more exclusively to 
the good of the paper. Kach day's 
delay means so much handicap in get- 
ting the required number of points ; 
wherefore we urge prospective com- 
petitors to hand in their names at the 
earliest possible date. 



li-4.'. c 

7-00 r 

a-io p. 



An Aggie team has returned from 
Hanover defeated by a score that is 
unparalleled for size in the history 
of our relations with Dartmouth. 
Whereupon gloom spreads itself over 
the face of the professional grouch 
and he says that the team and the 
system are rotten lleing a man who 
has learned football through the sport- 
ing page and the back row of the 
bleachers, he ought to know what he 
is talking about. .Just where he gets 
his license to knock we know not, hut 
we do have ft burning desire to squelch 
his first attempt nt criticising a team 
and coaches who are giving every- 
thing they have to uphold the repu- 
tation of the old college. A hard 
schedule Is before them antl they 
need more than ever the united baek- 
ing of the entire student body. We 
trust that the loyal Aggie rooters 
outnumber the would be critics by at 
least ten to one. which is but another 
way of saying that ■ knocker should 
be about as popular on the campus as 



for learning on a farm. The effect- 
iveness of agricultural college train- 
ing should be measured not in terms 
of the number of farmers it turns out 
but by the service of its graduates to 
the welfare of the state. It is a 
question for debate as to which is of 
more value to the community, a prac- 
tical farmer or an agricultural spec- 
ialist, who though he never work a 
farm, may be the means of saving 
money for other farmers. The func- 
tion of this college, as we see it, is 
to train such agricultural specialists. 
Another statement of the critics 
of the college which becomes more 
and more significant as we analyze it 
is to the effect that the college spends §-tt c m. Mandolin Club Rehearsal, 



(Win r. u.- 



Siieial t'uioii. 
Kiiii.w, <><t. 20. 
M. Moving I'iilure-,. Muck- 
l.rblge Hall. 

S\n t:t>\\, »»■ i •_'!. 



too much time in the study of hu- 
manities. Such an opinion is right 
in line with the archaic idea that s ,, " J: > ' 
farmer should he of a class apart. 
an inferior class without other in- 
terest than that of tilling the soil for MB*, m. Freshman Football. 1020 

the benefit of the cultured dwellers VM - ***»««« N( " th m « h 

_* ,, ... » T , _, , at Amherst. 

of the cities. No one has vet offered , , , 

Interelass cross county be- 
any valid reason why farmers should twmn , litlves „, ,,„. Freah . 

not have the same appreciation as man game, 

city people of the finer things of :mhi p. m. Varsity Football. M. A. c. 

life, and indeed, COUUtv agents tell "- Banraal at Cambridge. 

us that of the many questions biought ***-!■• *■ President'! Herepiion to 



to them by farmers in the course of 
their visits more than half requite for 
their answering knowledge entirely 
divorced from the ideas of. strictly 
practical agriculture. Only by 



I lie Fresh men. 



KAPPA SIGMA GETS CUP 

In the deciding game of the inter- 

fraternitv baseball league Thursday 

afternoon Ik-la Kappa I'hi defeated 
contemporary study of the humani- A , |)ha sigm;i ,,,„ ^ The wjn . 

ties can an agricultural student re- B|N pnlltl(k , c , >Se( , gwic . k hard and 



a 



ceive the broad foundational tisin- 
ing necessary to bis usefulness in the 
community. 

We believe furthermore that the 
comparatively small number of grad- 
uates who actually own farms of their 
own is due largely to economic con- 
ditions rather than to any lack of 



secured a lead of seven runs in the 
first inning. The feature of the 
game was the playing of dough. He 
secured two healthy clouts and hv a 
sensational running catch robbed 
Kennedy of what looked like a sure 
home run in the fifth inning. 



Beta Kappa I'lii. 7 it *2 g |J 

training furnished by the college. Mph# Sigma Phi. o o ■ 1 I— s 

The average man who graduates from Batteries Hoiks and miwut, Sedg- 

an agricultural college has not the * ,ek * K« BMd I i,, " 1 7bitmpmm, r /...- 
, , pin' — I .arson. Beoref Npaulditig, lime 

capital necessary to start farming for 1 hour, 

himself, and so enters some allied By losing this game Alpha Sigma 

Hue of business in order to acenmu- : Phi lost their last chance to win the 

late the necessary capital. Finding interfrnternity title. Kappa Sigma 

the business congenial and offering is now entitled to the cup awarded 

good chances for advancement he to the winner of the baseball series. 



the proverbial wood-pussy at a gar- gives up his hopes for the farm and 

den fete. stays with the job. Although \\v\- 

ing the best intentions in the world 

SoMKof the criticisms of the col- of becoming a farmer, other forces 

lege brought out in the recent hear- have acted on him to force him into 

ing before the investigation commit- other lines of work. Statistics of 

lee in Huston make us wonder a little Aggie graduates show, however, a 

as to just what constitutes a college verv large proportion of men en- 

of agriculture. Is it simply si place gaged in agricultural pursuits when 

to learn by practice the various op- we take these words in their hroad- 

erations of farm work so as to be est sense. .lust so long as this eol- 

I 
turned out at the end of three or lege continues to turn out men with a 

four years as "practical farmers?" sympathy for agriculture and a 
We venture to say that if this opin- scientific training adapting them to 
ion were general among the young agricultural pursuits just so long will 
men of the state there would be no it remain in the position of leader- 
further cry for dormitories at the ship which it lias obtained through 
agricultural college — the present years of patient struggle from a 
facilities would be ample for all the farm school to a real college. 
students who would wish to attend. "' ■"■■■aaaaaaaaa— — 
The reason is simple enough. An CAMPUS CALENDAR 
intelligent voting American is not INo«cstfor«rt»«ol«»»Bs*saMlbsdroppsdta 

... . ... ... s«t the Ioi.i.kih an office or banded to Nathan 

likely to spend his money learning in w . n „i,. ue .,„ „ n „ r t „ fl „ ( . llie Monday „ re . 
a college that which he can be paid ceditnr each jusue.l 

Ti ksi. \\ , ( >< i. IT. 

it. - <Mee Hub [to hearsa], Social 

t'nion. 

m.— Was Tread, Drill Hall, 
College < Irehest ra. 

\\ M>M.sl> \\ . < >< I. \H. 

m. — Assembly. Mr. Fred 1J. 
Free m an, "sec i». i a ryot ( oil li- 
ly Work, International V. 
M. C A.. New York City. 
'lit ■ i:si.\\ (h i. 11). 

Class exercises suspended 
National Dairy Show, 
>priiigliehl. 
l<>-;;u v. 'I. Hearing for Commission 
on Investigation, Spring- 
liebl. 

V. M. < . \. Meeting in 
old Chapel. 



a 



BIDE-A-WEE 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our specialty — And other good things to M! 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Stieet, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. 415-VV 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant st. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KH.I'Hli si'NIMV -KKVICK AT 7 I*. IH, 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of tut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. 'Phis stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

• . I. p li.i lo- «oo 



MASS. 



MASS. — 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



Black 
Black 
Black 



and White 
and White 
and White 



CIGARETTES 

Strikingly Superior... 

HENRY ADAMS ® CO. 
— The Rexall Store — 



01 LAVAL 

Cream Separator 
Supremacy 

38 YEARS of LEADERSHIP 



OVER *• jf,-ir. of i-\|>i-rieiii t- and thou- 
sands of lenU the world over have ilen, 
oti*nnted the Me Larat to be tin- only flu., 
otuthlr Heal) skimming cream scnantsr. 
Superior construction throughout mtM 
rio*»ji,] ( . greater ta^mrity, cleaner ■kiniinlrtfl 
and a keavftr t ream than can besciiin.l 
with any other machine. 

The driving mechanism of the D« jatsl ii 
perfectly oiled and the bowl runs st »!»»« 
Speed, all of which Is conducive to the long 
llf# of the machine, a lie l,a*ai will ta»t 
from IB to2§ years, while the life of t ,tli,r 
creatn SetNtratOFS averages from 3 to 1 yeiin, 
Xot a } ear goes hy but What sonic Imprme* 
ment is made in lie Layal machine.*, and ».< 
stone i» left nntorned by the iw L*vm! Com- 
lwny to InsBie tt» erBfy be ljiy.il user lh» 
greatest poartlde service from his niachlne 

More tie Lavttls are sold eyery yMW than 
all other make* combined, aad lie f^yat 
imers are Battsfled n«e»— not only when ('.. 
machine in tiew but during the many years 
Of Hs life. 

The Dm Laval Separator Co. 



iǤ Buoadwat 
NEW YORK 



29 K. MahhowW 
CHICAGO 



CAMPUS NOTES 

•Apple Day" took place Tuesday, 
Oct. !"• 

President Butterfield will tender a 
reception to the Freshmen SaturdHy 
nh'lit at the president's house. 

Milk Inspector's Day will he ob- 
served at the college Thursday morn- 
ing Milk ins|iertors from various 
part ^ of the country will In- here. 

Preparations will begin tliis eve- 
plug for Saturday'! informal. A. 
was tread will be held and the <a»l- 
lege orchestra will furnish the music 

while incidentally practicing for the 

informal. 

Prof, John Ii. Scherrer, head of 
the departments of floriculture and 
landscape gardening at the NYw 
Hampshire State < ollege, spent 
Monday on the Campus inspecting 
the work done here. 

Sigma I'hi Kpsilon wishes to an- 
nounce the initiation of Walter Irv- 
ing Cross '17 of llingham, (Jeorge 
Burdette Castle "111 of I'ittslieid. and 
Adelheit Newton 'iy of l'lttsfield on 
(let. G. 

Lewis I.vniis '1^, helped liotkland 
Grange win the state grange cham- 
pionship in tiihletics at the Kaslein 
States Kxposition at Springfield. 
Rockland defeated Wilhrahain 56 to 
:'7. Lyons won first in the mile, 
hop. step and jump, ami the 2'J0- 
yard dash and second in the 100- 
vard dash. 



SCHEDULE OF TRAINS, HAMP 
TO NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 



\. M. 



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DAY ELECTED TO SENATE 

Seven Men Also Elected to Informal 
Committee 
James II. Day '17 of llatlield was 
elected to the ( ollege Senate at as- 
sembly last Wednesday, being chosen 
to till the vacancy caused l>v the 
resignation of . I. Dixon Hirchard of 
Springfield. The following informal 

loiiimitlee was also elected : Curl A. 
(.iirshin of Lvnn. Kdinund H. Hill 
of Rutherford, N. J., William Sa- 
ville. Jr., «tf Wuhan, an ' Arthur K. 
Williams of Sunderland, senior men* 
hers; John A. Chapman of Salem, 
Kenneth L Messenger of Winsted. 
Conn., and Lewis W. Spaulding 
of South Hiiighain, junior members. 



PROPOSED STRAW VOTE 

National Results May Be Forecasted 
at M. A. C. Polls 
Hughes or Wilson? To settle tins 
question of political supremacy the 

College "senate is seriously consider- 
ing a straw ballot, to he taken a few 
• I, us before the regular election. 

The plan, if put into operation, 
will he to have :i regular polling 
place ft bout the campus where stu- 
dents can stop and vote, after heiny 
exposetl to the heated electioneering 
of the various party enthusiasts. In 
other colleges the idea has worked 
out well and with the present party 
feeling it should (trove extremely in- 
teresting to the student body. 



RURAL ORGANIZATION 

The seventh annual conference on 
Rural Organization was held in the 
Chapel this week Monday and Tues- 
day. About •_»*> people attended. 
The program consisted of discussions 
on problems of rural organization, 
organization projects, agricultural 
resources of the state, and the rural 
policy and problem in Massachusetts. 
Among the speakers were President 
liutterfield. Dr. Cnnee, Professor 
Morgan and Professor Hurd. 



DOING PRACTICAL WORK 

Despite the forlorn civ of the op- 
position at the M. A. C. Investiga- 
tion hearings in regard to classicism 
at Aggie, Juniors taking Pom 60 
find their work very practical. Real 
experience is gained picking and 
cutting apples, pears and grapes. 
Notice is also made of where the 
strawberry patches are, real knowl- 
edge to be used next spring. 

Freshmen are dividing part of the 
time between the (jrinuell Arena 
where they are judging live stock 
and the Chem. laboratory, where su- 
perphosphate is the desired result of 
their work. 

The building of up-to-date poul- 
try houses is keeping the rural en- 
gineering class busy while some of 
the poultry enthusiasts are keeping 
the chickens in good condition in 
similar houses. 

The seniors in pomology have 
taken on some of the duties usually 
attributed to the housewife. Two 
rooms have been fixed up in the 
cold storage plant and here the po- 
mologists have been making grape 
juce, apple butter, jelly, and canning 
plums. When not engaged in this 
work they arc learning the correct 
fruit packing ami picking methods hv 
doing the work themselves. 

Juniors in tloiieulttnv are doing 
a complete piece of regla/.ing on the 
old plant house north of French 
Hall range in an attempt to keep this 
oldest campas greenhouse in usable 
condition. 



TMK 



United States Hotel 

lic.ii h I i t i . ■ i . I ( i and KIngftun Sin 

BOM ON, HA5S. 



onb !«!> Muck* t'lnm Smith Terminal st.i 

linn. Mild M*tl) M'.n hcil from N.nih Slatimi 

In i Invitted li.Mh\,i>, ami i niivi'iiicnt tithe 
to the locut retail Hhiips uinl bualnvM cent i <■, 

ufr.ii in i lie ihcMlics and |il,n t •> of inteic*! 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

TRbta ami Mri ice iiiihii! |iat>ncil 
liiiokle! and nia|i «cnl U|Mt9 appll* at loll 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Pr prietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Nou- Books 

AiOMit* (ll 

. M. CURRAN 



Fountain Pens 

l.'i I Typewrite! 

C. 1-. DYER 



MOVIES FRIDAY NIGHT 

Although the han has been lifted 
on Ihe rule which kept students in 
town until after October Nth on ac- 
entint of the infantile paralysis scare, 
and which also barred them from at- 
tendance at the local "movie" show, 
the demantl for good pictures is so 
great that two more five-reel features 
will he shown in the Auditorum 
Friday night. 



WHY SUPPER WAS LATE 

Dinner was late at the Dining 
Hall .Monday evening owing to 
some argument among the workers 
behind the counter and "below the 
decks." Friction arose owing to an 
accidental breaking of dishes. A con- 
ference between the workers and Mr. 
F, C. Kenney smoothed out the matter 
satisfactorily to all concerned. 



FRATERNITY PLEDGES 

... r. v. 
Carl Heigholtl 19, Newport, K I. 

IHKTA CHI. 

Frederick Kugene Cole 'IV, 

South Portland, Me. 
Bttkitie Harvey '10, • 

Washing ton, D. ( .". 
Forrest S, Dance *1H, Faterson, N*. J. 

U.I'HA SIOMA Fill. 

Frank D, Utkrj '19, Brockton. 



FRESHMEN VS. WORCESTER 

With one victory to its credit and 
one defeat chalked up against it, the 
Freshmen foot-ball team meets Wor- 
cester North High on Alumni Field 
next Saturday. North High has one 
of the strongest high school teams in 
the state this year, and a hard close 
game is expected. 



NO THREATENED STRIKE 

The recent increase in wages of 
waiters at the dining hall came as the 
result of a new policy* in regard to 
student labor and not because of a 
threatened strike, as erroneously 
reported in last week's Cou.koian, 
Treasurer Kenney had already granted 
the purposed raise in pay even before 
the Senate committee took the matter 
up with him in behalf of the men 
affected. While one 01 two individ- 
uals may have threatened lo quit 
work no move toward a general 
strike was anticipated by the Senate 
committee. 



STUDENT FURNITURE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR EXPENSES Knnhle us 
to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 
CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



■ Liana i. mii'i 

Ntkpmkn Ijat^v, Fm.fi fh, «!«,. 

K*NUraC?rUHINU J KAV KI.KIf * 
IHO HHOADWAY. IV KW YORK 

OlAJB AND «JCIi,i\l.(|K 
I'INH AZS'Ij KIM. .»s „* 

.ii.i.n. mt.VRH A«fn SSIHMIS MaHMM 



- JOIN THE BUNCH AT 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located uver fott ultiee. Up otii> flight 

Pressing aid Cleaning a Specialty 

lateral luk-l system T«1,J6>M 



College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



1915 NOTES 

Richard Fuller left last Wednesday 
for Cuba where he is to work on a 
cane sugar plantation. 

Paul Hildreth is with the Rand Co. 
in North Tonawauda, N. Y. 

"Blondie" Marsh is now teaching 
in (Jorham, N. H. 

Herbert II. Archibald was married 
to Miss Frances Bales in Wilton, j 
N. H. on Aug. 10. "Archie" is' 
still principal of the Wilton high! 
school. 

John C.Callard ex. '15, is manager 
of the Buffalo branch of the Boston j 
Belting Co. 

Dauiel Lewis was married to Miss 
Alice Gilbert last week. 

It is reported from several 
sources that Sumner A. Dole, other- 
wise "Husky," is engaged to be 
married. 



Robert T. Frost was married 
Oct. 6 to Signe Tornberg of Brock- 
ton. "Bob" is in the tree surgery 
business at Brockton and will make 
this his home. 

A very enthusiastic letter has 
has just come to hand from W. A. 
Cleveland. "G rover" is instructor 
in general science and agriculture in 
the high school at Poplar Bluffs, Mo. 
He writes that he has just made his 
first acquaintance with rice and 
cotton farming and on the whole 
likes the west almost as well as New 
England. There is a report that in 
the near future the population of 
Poplar Bluffs is to be increased and 
that of Massachusetts decreased by 

one. 

Donald H. Cande annouwi's 
his engagement to Miss Dorothy A. 
Nelson of Dover, N. H. 



STUDENT LABOR DISCUSSED 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at i3 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescription* Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Kine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

E. B. DICKINSON, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 



Williams Block, 



Amherst, Mass 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valres 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Ga*. Asbestos 
and KsfMSla Boiler and Pipe Coverings. Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mms. 

HECKMAN'« 

Candies and Ice Cream 

** 1IAMP" 



orti.-e Hoars 9 to 12 a. ni.. 1-30 to ft p. m. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, i* • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust [ 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every mom. Prices • ! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) SI. SO and up. 

It* excellent cuisine and «eH ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory-every 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
Mrved in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music 

"d. h. sievers, 



JOHNSON BOOK CO, 



Subject at Wednesday Assembly. 

Complaint in Regard to Quality 

of Work Done. 

President Biitterfield gave a most 
interesting talk at last week's assem- 
bly on the student labor problem. 
How to solve this question has be- 
come a serious problem at M. A. C. 
That the matter is of importance is 
shown by the fact that in 1914 the 
college expended §*2:>,0OU for student 
labor. This included the equivalent 
of wages for the men who work in the 
dining hall, figured as cash, and also 
the money paid men who worked at 
the college in the summer. 

From the heads of some depart- 
ments come serious objections to stu- 
dent labor; they say it too often is 
inefficient anil inadaptable. In the 
ground** horticulture, aud farm 
departments there is a large demand 
for work at the beginning of each 
vear, but ''the fever soon dies out 
and there is often no labor available 
for these departments at times when 
it is badly needed." This makes it 
necessary to hire regular outside labor. 
Other departments complain that stu- 
dent labor is not satisfactory. These 
complaints have been particularly 
strong concerning janitor work done 
by students. The employment com- 
mittee has decided to put student 
labor on a different basis, and lias 
adopted a set of rules intended to 
lessen or remove cause for complaint 
including student employees when 
they are proved to be unsatisfactory. 



INDEX MEN GETTING BUSY 

Bigger, better, classier, dandier, 
funnier, only begins to detCrlhe 
big edition of the 19 1H Jiabx \nn- 
chasable for only 82.50 of the coin, 
of the realm. We are hindered in 
our description of the junior annual 
due to the objection of our big chief. 
"Etta*" who objects to our rJieclosing 
his many novel i (novations. But, if 
vou'll promise not to tell our WOI 
"ed," we will give you a little ml 
vance dope. "llig," our class hu- 
morist, told us on the "q-t" this \ 
M that the grinds are funnier than 
Billv's physics ; while "Beany," our 
eminent artist, bids fair to outdo 
James Montgomery Flagg, I hurl. - 
Dana Gibson and Howard Chan. It i 
Christy eomhirjed, in his new n ra- 
tions. Just wait until ymi see thow 
write-ups, class histories, editorial 

articles, etc., if yon don't prot m 

them the best ever we'll buy you n 
new folded brown derby. Well our 
space is all used up SO we will post- 
pone that dope we promised until 
next time. Jusl keep your «*)'.* 
peeled on this space for more ••in- 
side stuff." 4ft». 



DEANS SATURDAYS 

Dean's Saturdays are scheduled for 
Nov. 4 and !>.•<■ I <«f the present 
term. There will be only two boards 
a term instead of three a SfftHitW 
as in previous years 



Agricult 

and Filing Cases 



Hlrhlftnd m-.i.i. 



SprlugnH.I. 



BABBITT & WOODW 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 




Huntington Ave., Exeter end Blagden St*., Boston, Mui 

Headquarters for College Men when in the cily. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY. 



F. A S 




"MICRO" DEPARTMENT READY 
TO MOVE TO NEW BUILDING 

The microbiology department will 
move into its uew home on the east 
campus the first part of nest week. 
The rooms to be vacated by the micro- 
biology department in Flint labora- 
tory will be made into a reading 
room for the dairy department. It 
is also planned to establish a laundry 
in the room in the basement of Flint 
hi I .oratory which now serves as a 
reading room. The suits used by 
the dairy department will be washed 
there. This will give the students 
majoring in dairying some experience 
in laundering, which is important in- 
asmuch as many large dairies are 
establishing laundries at their plants, 



JUNIOR ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 
William 1. Soodwiu of Haverhill 
and Oliver C. Pratt of Salem have 
been elected to represent the jimim 
class on the mteiclas* athletic com- 
mittee. Flections for the junior 
prom committee will be math- by Lin- 
class at a near future meeting. 

FRESHMEN ELECT 
At a meeting of the freshman foot- 
ball team. Hi. hard H. (*orw:.iz of 
Newburyport was chosen captain f»>i 
the resl of the season. 



MEN'S STORE 

Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local Agent Jor ^^ ^ BROWNINQ KlNQ ^ ^ 

* Custom Tailors 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKET SACKS YOU S% 



C&rptrvUr St Morchoust, 

PRINTERS* 



No. i. Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



GARDEN STJB-8TAT10N 
The committee appointed to select 
a tile for a market garden substation 
has made several tiips through the 
market garden districts of the state, 
but have made no selection as yet. 
The committee consists of seventeen 
men from the college board of trustees 
andlhemarketgardeners association. 
Last Friday this committee looked 
over a number of farms in and around 
Lexington and Arlington in the Bos- 
ton market garden district. The 
work of the substation will be to in- 
vestigate market gardening difficulties 
and tosoggest remedies and improve- 
ments. 



1916 NOTES 
(ieorge Danforth is teaching in the 
high school at Hoy a Hon, Minn. 

1». A. Flaisled. who is with da 1 
Westinghouse Co. in SpringfleW, 
accidentally shot himself in the fort 
■ few weeks ago. bmt is fast rewir- 
ing from the inconvenience of Jimp- 
ing around 

K. L. Chisholm visited the college 
last week preparatory to his ilepart- 
ure to Cuba where he is to work on « 
cane sugar plantation. 

P. H. Jordan was married to Um 
Marion 11. Carter at Dan vers on 8#pt 
7, 

H. B. Mahan has charge of *tt«- 
tensive orchard on the Rice fare -» 
Brattletroro, Vt. 

"Charlie" Huntington mm 
about the campus during B» *** 
end. Herbert Bishop, l * Doc" M 
and "Charlie" Moses were ahw a 
town. "Mose" is running a lbMf» 
farm up in Ticondsroga. 



CONCERT AT HADLEY 

The management of the musical 
,!u]is already has one good date 
stilted down for the schedule The 
fun is set for Dec. 1 iu Dudley town 
hall. There will be a concert and 
dance under the auspices of Hopkins 
Academy. 



spies, and choice spy fruit commands 
a price running up to $9 a barrel, 
sometimes selliug for about twice 
what less desirable apples bring. 
Foreman John Openshaw has pre- 
pared a bos to be exhibited at the 
Ku^tern States Exposition at Spring- 
field. The trees are eight years old. 



ORCHARD PRODUCES SPIES 
OF QUANTITY AND QUALITY 

Northern spy trees in the college 
orchards have surprised the pomology 
department with a crop that is remark- 
able in both quantity and quality. 

••I doubt that 1 ever had spies any 
larger or more uniform and highly 
colored/' says Prof. Frank A.Waugh, 
while Associate Professor Waller W. 
(.lie no we th calls the crop so fine as 
to be almost startling. The depart- 
ment regards the production as sig- 
niluant, because compaiatively few 
ttom are adapted to growing 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'71 — Mr. E. B. Sinead has re- 
signed as the principal of the Wat- 
kinsou Farm School in Hartford, 
Conn., the resignation to take effect 
February, 1917. He has had the 
position for .'51 years and is letiring 
at this time in order to seek rest and 
recreation. 

•SO. — A. L. Fowler of Haddonfield, 
N. J. is now state bank examiner for 
southern New Jersey. 

*14. — The engagement of Harry 
Brown to Miss Ruth Thatcher of 
Littleton, has been announced. 




The Great American Smoke 

Fall in line with hundreds of thousands of red- 
blooded smokers of the good old U. S. A. Smoke 
the cigarette tobacco that's been an American insti- 
tution for three generations — "Bull" Durham. The 
rich, relishy, star-spangled taste of "Bull" Durham 
puts the national spirit of get-up-and-hustle into your 
hand-rolled cigarette, "Bull" Durham is the freshest, 
snappiest, liveliest of smokes. 

GENUINE 

Bull Durham 

SMOKING TOBACCO 

-Ron your own" with "Bull" Durham and you'll 
find a far greater satisfaction in smoking your ciga- 
rette than you ever did before. 

Made of the richest, mild- 
est leaf grown, "Bull" Durham 
has a delightful mellow-sweet 
flavor f oun d i n no other tobacco. 

Men who never smoked 
cigarettes before are now "roll- 
ing their own** with "Bull 
Durham. 
pnur 1 An iiiu»tt«»d b<wW- 

f* t\ W* W* let, showing correct 
* *X*-i*-J wa -, to " « Ro)) Your 

Oun" QtMWMM, WW • p«'k«B' °j 

ft«nr,-ti«. paper*, will both ba mmted, 

• any n,i lre»» in S BM rt-QUMt. 

Attaint r M" Duiii«m.Duiham,N,C. 

THB AMHUCA3 TOBACCO CO. 



Ath for FREE 

package nf paper* 
uiith tmch Sc sack 




- WELCOME - 

1920 



Come in and let us help you get 

started RIGHT 



We have the largest .stuck ol young men's clothing \vc have 
ever shown. 

You know the kind Hart SchalTner St Marx make. 

All our haherdashciy is ol the best and our prices ;nc always 
the LOWEST. 

Ask any upper-cl;i>s man about 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 






School ana College Photographers 




LOCALLY: 5 a Ce.iter St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 

Main Office: These Studios offer the best skilled 

1546-1548 Hroadway, artists and most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable. 



E. FRANK COE 

FERTILIZERS 

I 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over f>5 Years 



•m 



RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

THE COE-MORTIMER GO. 




51 Chambers St., New York City 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1916. 



NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

I • mitimifd from page 1] 



South Dakota State college sent 
her team the greatest distance, from 
Brooking!, S. I), to Springfield. 
Oilier teams which traveled long dis- 
tances to compete in the contest were 
North CaroliDA ( Missouri, Nebraska, 
Kansas, and Iowu. Individual scores 
in the various breeds follow : 

OUKBN8BY8. 

.). H. Dawson, Kansas, 822.5 

W. I). E&StOUU), New York, Ml. •_>•'» 

II. H. llawes, Rhode Island, 3:10 

AVICSII1KKS. 

\V F. Roberts, Nebraska, 827 

L. B. Wood, Maine, Ml 7 

M. II. Benson, New Hampshire, .'5 16 

.IKKSKYS. 

('. II. Clough. Massachusetts, M'2 1 
S. W. Mead, Connecticut, 844.0 

S. W. Noyes. Massachusetts, 242.4 

iiolstein*. 

W. V. Roberts, Nebraska, 848.75 

Joseph Lee, North Carolina, :>:'..'». 00 

J, R. Dawson, Kansas, 880.00 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTA1N PENS 



Oilers courses <»f instruction in twenty .seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Social Science 



Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



1913 NOTES 
.lames \V. Dayton, Horticultural 

Instructor. The Theodore N. Vail 
Agricultural School and Farms, Lyn- 
don Center, \'t. ".limmie" attend- 
ing the Dairy Show stopped oil at 
College for a week end. 

Stuart D. Samson, Farm Superin- 
tendent, Hillside St., Milton. "Big 
Sam" left his family long enough to 
take in the Dairy Show and make a 
flying trip to college. 

Harold F. Jones, Los Moehis, 
Siualoa, Mexico, with United Sugar 
Companies, returned from Mexico 
loug enough to say how dee and beat 
it buck, after strongly recommending 
Wilson's Mexican policies and buying 
Miller Jordan another tennis sweater. 
Dean F. Baker and family spent 
their summer vacation in Amherst, 
where Dean spent a four years* vaca- 
tion, "Beanie" is draughtsman for 
the Brecht Co., 171 Pearl St., New 
York City. 

Lawieuce A. Be van, the Agricul- 
tural Instructor from Concord was 
seen prowling around the National 
Dairy Show at Springfield last week. 
Isaac Coleman, Holstein specialist 
and gentleman farmer, visited college 
last week. Isaac is going to buy a 
farm soon to settle dowm. Home 
address, :i«l Huntington Ave., Bos- 
ton. 

James D. French, back from Hon- 
olulu, farm managing down near 
Clyde Cristraan somewhere, Sherbon. 
"Dud" is contemplating getting mar- 
ried, hence his silence. 

Harold W Hyland, Instructor in 
science, High School, Hemet, Cal. 
••Dick" visited college this summer 
with his usual line and is still single. 

'08— Mr. F. L. Edwards ha* beeo 
appointed to the position to be left 
vacant by Mr. E. B. Smead, Mr. 
Edwards is now principal of the Ag- 
ricultural High School in Petersham. 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercollegiute Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie d Association. 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Semite, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association. 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
11. E. Robbins, Manager 
L. T. Buck man, Piesident 
R. L. Holden, Manager 
R. 1). Hawley, Manager 
(). S. Flint, Manager 
M. R. Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams, Manager 
I). M. Lipshires, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
1). 0. Merrill, President 
E. L. King, President 
L. T. Buckman, President 
M.J. McNamara, President 



l ire i >v-i ,,. t ,{•»<).)>.* iv vou »hould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 

WOODWARD'S 
tUNCH 

17 Main St.. Masonic Bldn., 
Northampton, Ma«. 



Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Cu> f */ >mlx rr.»m i A %t Nt 4 ,4 kt 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famou-. Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old iJeerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mites of Trackage /lodern 
Equipment —Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Homnanv 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
stale outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave ACWIE COLLEGE for HOI • 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past the hour. 

Special Car* at Raaaenabl* Rata* 



AliHERST & SUNDtRLAND SI. RY. CC 



I "III-: TBHMBV 1-»A •*!-*»■* 

ClrHiialDK I'rfBuIng K-|mO«ni 
(Jul. W.-.I unttt, H*-»t Work l,oir»l I*' 1 '* 
All woik carefully done. Work called \m mt 
delivered. Gents' overcoat!, suits l»nt« »rc 
coat*. Ladies' rin« linen *uita a speeiiitv 
Teams will call e»ery daj at M A «, 

Hear Na*h Bl'k. Amh«r»t. Tel No W» ' 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNI FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Masaachusetta Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of M Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



Amherst 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College War I 



Shiru, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



1494-1426 Chc«tnut St.. 



Philadelphia, Pa 



io-i5 e 
j 1 K 
1 rti 

48c per A* 
. 301 prr P» 

DRY CLEARING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits for $>M 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #i 5° a J 

All bllli payable at (..-op. -<••" 
left there will receive prompt sttl 

Orayiios *17, Agent A 

IflOQIXSOTttAM *fl* M* *" 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



VARSITY FALLS BEFORE A 
SUPERIOR HARVARD WEIGHT 

Fights Gamely but Loses 47-0. Fum- 
bles Costly to Both Sides. 

Handicapped by its comparatively 
light weight, and lacking speed and 
defensive power when most needed, 
the M. A. C. football team was over- 
powered by Harvard in the Stadium 
at Cambridge Saturday by the score 
of 47 to 0. It was not truthfully by 
a "soft snap" however, that Haugh- 
ton's meu gained their seven touch- 
downs with goals from five of them, 
for the losers fought gamely, though 
in vain, to stem the Crimson tide. 
Harvard's machine, with its far 
greater weight, and frequent substi- 
tutions of fresh players, often re- 
quired all of the four alloted at- 
tempts to gain a first down, and 
many times resorted to kicking, in 
which department they were little 
stronger than their opponents. 

Fumbling was a costly weakness 
of both teams, showing overeager- 
ness on the winners* side and ner- 
vousness on the losers*. The first 
two touchdowns closely followed 
Aggie fumbles within 20 yards of 
••«r own goal. On the other hand, 
■ times, once in the second 
>d on the Massachusetts 5-yard 
, once in the third on the 9-yard 
, and again in the last quarter 
,• 12 vards awav, Harvard's back- 
", 1 fumbles were recovered by 
rfie men, preventing' almost cer- 
; j scores. 

Two attempts at drop-kick goals 
from the field were made by the 
Crimson, the first in the opening 
period from the 20-yard line, and 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 24, 1916. 

ARRANGEMENTS FOR AGGIE HEARINGS ON M. A. C. PROBE 
NIGHT AFTER TUFTS GAME AROUSE AGGIE SUPPORTERS 



No. 4 



"Sibyl", Musical Comedy, Attraction 

at Colonial Theatre. Limited 

Number of Tickets. 

Last year the custom was inaugu- 
rated of having an "Aggie Night" at 
some desirable theater, where the 
students who go to Boston for the 
Tufts-M. A. ('. football game, could 
attend in a body. The "Follies of 
l'Jl.'i" were selected last year and the 
success of the whole undertaking was 
unquestionable. 

For this year the musical comedy 
"Sibyl" just released from New York, 
has been chosen, which features Julia 
Sanderson, Donald Brian and Joseph 
Hawthorne. The play will be staged 
at the Colonial theater, Boston, on 
the night of the Tufts game, Nov. 4. 
Seats will be $1.."»0 and $2.00. 

A limited number of tickets have 
beenordeied and will go on sale as 
soon as they come. Fosters will be 
up, concerning when aud where they 
will be sold. After Saturday, Oct. 
28, BO tickets can be obained through 
Manager Williams who must return 
all unsold tickets before Saturday 
noon. 






Mm 



Many Alumni and Men of Prominence 
Defend the College. Several Con- 
structive Ideas Offered. 

Constructive suggestions of ways to 
improve the work of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college ami to develop 
interest in agriculture in the state 
were discussed at the third hearing 
given by the investigation commission I 
at Springfield Thursday, Oct. U». 
Many alumni and others interested in 
agricultural progress in Massachusetts 
were present at the hearing, which 
lasted from 10-110 a. m. until I o'clock. 
Dr. L. Clark Scelye presided. The 
commission seeks justification for the 
appropriation of 1 1,200,000, which 
the college has asked from the Legis- 
lature. 

The question "Is the college resjiou- 
sible for the lack of interest in agri- 
culture in Massachusetts?" drew from 
the many speakers ihe general opinion 
in the negative, and that the college 
was doing its established duty was 
the expression of those who appeared 
l>efore the commission. Among the 
various suggestions offered were those 
advocating a development of the ex- 
tension work, ami others which 
favored more short course instruction. 
The large DUtnber of speakers made 
it necessary to limit the time of each 
man to five minutes. Albert W. Gil- 
bert *04, professor of plant breeding 
at Cornell, made a comparison of con- 
ditions at "Aggie" with those at Cor- 
nell ami other agricultural colleges. 
Walter F. Butter *I7 of Lawrence, 
said that his work at M. A. C. accom- 
panied by two summers of practical 



RECEPTION TO FRESHMEN 

Saturday evening President Butter- 
field opened his home to the fresh- 
man class for his annual reception. 
President and Mrs. Butterfield re- 
ceived the uew men, giving them a 
hearty welcome to the college. 
Among the guests were ( Prof.and Mrs. 
Bobbins, Prof, and Mrs. Machmer, 
Mrs. ( "mrv S. Hicks, and Mrs.H.W. 
Fleet who helped entertain the fresh- 
men. Nearly the entire class wasjj^^ wo * k maiJe nj|n fee , ^(jdem 
there, including the co-eds, and music 1 ^ f ^ cmM make n allPt . egH al r Rrm . 



EIGHTY SEVEN FRESHMEN 
PLEDGE TO FRATERNITIES 

Fifty Eight Per Cent of Class. Next 
Pledge Date January 15. 

With H" men pledging to the vari- 
ous fraternities the rushing season of 
1916 ended Monday morning. This 
number was not only larger than that 
of last year hut was a much larger 
proportion of the freshman class, 
being 58 per cent as against Ji'.J per 
cent for the season of 11MA. Accord- 
ing to the revised rules no further 
pledging can take place until the 
third Monday of the winter term or 
Jan. 1$. The list of pledged men 
follows : 

a. t. v. 

I.oiin I.. Hall. 

< iharles If, Bnardmao, 

< .union it, < "rafts, 



Hubert S llorne, 
(Jet utrc A , Sin 1 1 h . 
I. dm Uliil SI lei-kel . 
Kliul II. lavloi. 

Kenneth N . Wright, 



Amherst 
Amherst 

ManelieNlci 

H r Henley Farms 

\\ liitinsvillf 

\. m Y«>rk < iu 

MiellMirtie Falls 

Arlington 



the other in the final quarter *"«; and ringing helped make the evening Hen jamin Vener *15 attributed 

; held twice without gain on the cnjovablejaDd get the 1920 men better £ mvwu niTaH Hrotne „ „ ex , >erf 



Both were 



M em- 



it. A C. 30-yard line. Bom were acquainted wlth eacQ other 

hurried and went wide. herg of the genate am i u, e officers of 

little use was made of the open I ^ ^^j^^ V \ MB acted as ushers. 

game by either eleven, Of Aggie's i |, |MM | 

three attempts at forward-passing!^ YVTTHERSPOON OF BOSTON 

> went incomplete, and the other | jq §p|?A.K FRIDAY EVENING 



was intercepted by Thrasher in the ; 
second quarter, bringing the ball to | 
Hay State's 20-yard line, whence j 
faaey, aided by strong line hoi ing, ! 
crossed the final line on the next; 
i»! »y for the fourth touchdown of the \ 
tuniest. Harvard used straight 
football almost entirely, and tried 
oiilv two forward passes, the first 
■ ''-ing intercepted by Moynihan on 

Continued on p**e S| 



IS Stlet'i' 

bacteriologist to the training he had 
received in the microbiology and chem- 
istrv departments of M. A. ('. He 
told of earning money to pay his way 
through college by working one sum- 
mer in the basement of the library 
wiping mold off the large number of 
valuable l>ookH which are of necessitv 



The Social Union committee has 
been exceedingly fortunate In secur- 
ing Halliday Witlierspoon of Boston Htore ,j there owing to lack of shelf 
for the evening of the 27th, Mr. room j n the library. The question of 
Witherspoon has been war corre- t j |e morB \ status was brought up and 
spondent of the Boston Il-m Id for waiat rongly defended by the "Aggie" 
several yean spending a year in I iU pporters. K. M. Whitcomb, vice- 
Europe and paaaing this wo mer president of the Amherst National 
in Mexico. His experiences should g an k | gpoke very highly of the moral 
of the greateat interest to the standing of the students. Othew 



Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Philip 11. Armstrong, Kutberford, v. .1. 
Janes I*. Bridge, §•■ Ante»to,T«a, 

Dtimiiii < Ik 1 tin I min, 

William V I hl»t af SOB, 

Harold llaaklua, 
(martes 11. Station, 
Pnillp n. Me well, 
Per*) K. Qulnry, 

1 ii;i- II. IJ11 IihiiIn, 

Ivan A. Unbelts. 
.Inliu II. SnoW. 

itnipii B, Stedinan. 
Alfred w Turner, 



Arlington 

Wuni'sli'i 

Ninth A tuber* I 

I .1-1 lltaiiiiiii 

Weal Sewitin 

A list on 

Hprlngflelri 

Boilth l.ei 

Arlington 
Kprfngffehl 

Havana, (tiha 



Kappa Sigma. 



< liniiin .1. iJaggeifi 

\\ alien M. Dewintt, 
Hpuel W. Klilredge, 

Richard 11. Uorwafs, 

siiur M. King, 



Albany, H, ^ 

KiiijfHtini 

VVltK'hesiei 

\i « liinyjHjll 
I'itl 1, field 



.lame** 0, Maplpi., I'ori Cheater, N. \ 
Kri.l V. Waii«h \iiiha»t 

Kappa Gamma Phi. 
Abratu T. liowen, (iranville. N. \ 

.1..I111 K. Uelahunt, KorcheMier 

Itiiliaril W. 1'anii.woitli. LaUCHlMM 

liar.. bl I., Harriiigtoii, I.iitH'iilniru 

Herbert a. M.Anile. Woreestir 

lliTinuit ile\V. Hjiji*-. ,Sjiml> Honk, Con II 
Ralph II, SjiimIitwhi, Wulltiniii 

( niiti, St» iicii', llriiihtoii 

John W. I rijiiharili. Ka*t VValpiili- 

Milton I", Wi'lixtct Maiden 

Ralph Woodward, Jl (Irafitin 

Beta Kappa Phi. 



prove 
student body. 



LCoaUav*d on 1*1 • »J 



John A. Crawford. 
Krank T, C. Hale 
Havln A, Hard, 

Donald la-nt, 

KhtI I). Ijiithrit|>. 

Philip a. Readlo, 

ICay mniid A. Sin i th 



AI1hIi.ii 
hylteld 

irelleatay HHhi 

May rial 1 1 

WeM HriiliffWllti'l 

Florence 

Mavnard 






i 













The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



3 



Theta Chi. 

Kenneth Blanehard, 
Paul I,. Harriet t . 
Allen M. Hums, 
Fred \V. <'hirri«l»f, 
l)nii;ilil <;, |>avidsi>h, 
Jonathan Holloway. 
Charles K. iuiiai»«.i<i, 
John E. I.iitleliehl, 
M:m\ A. Murray, Jr. 
Joseph <'. Paige, 
Mark M. Uichanlson. 
Lester M. Simmons, 
Kaymuod N. Smith, 
Masiin Ware, 

Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
Mil.. It. Bacon, Leominster 

Hubert I*. Cande, I'ltuiieid 

John i'. Cart loo, Baal sandwich 

Warren S. Hathaway. Somerset 

s. Austin Phillips, Pittsrield 

ttalph K. Schamlmayei , Marlboro 

Donald II. Smith, Plttsfleld 

John Vigesxi, Greal Barrtngtoa 

Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Haverhill 

Leicester 

Taunton 

Milford 

A inherut 

Taunton 

Syracuse, Ind. 

Lynn 

Uaynham (enter 

Hardwiek 

North Dana 

High ton 

IMainville 

Maiden 



Lorenzo fuller, 
lla/.en W. Hamlin, 

F. Harold Holland, 

Kenneth S. Hyde, 
Brooks .lakeman, 
< lonrad J. Johnson, 
llichard B. Lamhert. 
William A . Luce. 
William 15. Stiles. 
Ralph 11. Sumner, 
Thornton <L Taylor, 

Alpha Sigma Phi. 



Lowell 

Amherst 

Shrewsbury 

Amherst 

Winchester 

(a in pel lo 

(ileasondale 

West lloylston 

< iieat Harrington 

Springfield 

Wahan 



(toorjrs W. V pan] . 
Frank S. Davenport . 
Holland K. (iaskill, 
Carlisle F. (iraves, 
Andrew H. Magnum. 
William 11. I'eckhani. 
Howard .1. Sh;itines«.\ . 
Walter M. Sullivan, 



Winchester 

Dorchester 

liopedale 

Stamford, Conn. 

Hoi yoke 

Newport, R. I. 

Fasthamptou 

Lawrence 



ROISTER DOISTERS READY 

FOR SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

The Roister Doiater Dramatic As- 
sociation has recently been reorgan- 
ized under new management with an 
expectation of au exceptionally suc- 
cessful season. This society is pure- 
ly liouorary, including those men 
who have taken an active part in at 
least one of t|ie college productions. 
The management has issued calls for 
candidates to compete for positions 
and every one interested in dramat- 
ics is urged to try out for the cast. 
( Mice a month the association meets 
to discuss with the general manager 
the proposed productions. 

Under the supervision of the gen- 
eral manager men desirous of a posi- 
tion on the business staff try out in 
their freshman sad sophomore 
years. Two of the eligible candi- 
dates are elected as business mana- 
gers for their junior year. One of 
these two serve as general manager 
during the senior year. 

It it the aim of the dramatic asso- 
ciation to raise the standard of MA 
C productions to equality with the 
best and without doubt, under the 
new system of organization, more 
men inclined toward dramatics will be 
encouraged to try out for the cast, 
giving better quality through wider 
selection. 

The first play to be given during 
"prom** season is under the careful 
consideration of Manager Williams 
at the present time. 



FRESHMEN IMPROVE GREATLY 
AND SWAMP WORCESTER HIGH 

Plenty of pep ami real football 
were the features of the game on 
Alumni field Saturday afternoon when 
the M. A. C. freshmen took the Wor- 
cester North High team into camp to 
the tune of 39 to 0. On both defense 
and offence the freshman team showed 
marked improvement over their play- 
ing of a week ago. The backfield 
men continually found big holes in 
the line and went through for long 
and consistent gains while the line 
held well and often stopped opposing 
plays before they were well started 

The scoring started in the first 
quarter when Lent carried the ball 
over on a rush through the line. In 
the second period Lent scored again 
on a long run and was closely fol- 
lowed by Cande who crossed the goal 
line for the third score. Vigezzi 
added another in the third quarter, 
and in the fourth a blocked kick by 
Vigezzi gave Lothrop a chance for a 
40 yard run for a touchdown. The 
last score came when Gray inter- 
cepted a forward pass and carried 
the ball 30 yards to the goal line. 
Dewing kicked three goals. 

Only once did the Worcester team 
threaten the Fieshman goal- This 
came in the second half when on a 
series of shift plays they worked 
down to within 2A yards of the Fresh- 
man goal. Here an attempted drop 
kick failed and the '20 men soon took 
the ball out of danger. 
The lineup : 

M.A.C. MiKHIIMKN. WORM KSTKII. N. II. 

(arleton, <;ray. Lotbrop, le re. Putnam 
Gorwaiz, It 
Beadio, Ik 

Taltnailge, 11*0(10, c 
MiLcod, Hunker. rt> 
Kiim, Fuller, rl 



Dewing, re 

Vigezzi, <|h 

Lent, Ball, lhh Hi I 

Gray. Mai Ion, rhl> 
Cande. Halloa, to 
Been M. A. c. m 



it, Gallck 

rg, Lyan 
c, Knoll 

lu, Luodgren 

It, Bickfonl 

le. MiKiiwn 

<|l>, McUrath 

, lleudenstatt 

lhh, Boyle 

fl», Mctiady 

a», Worcester 



JUNIORS WIN INTERCLASS 

CROSS COUNTRY RUN 29-33 

Carpenter '19 Places First. Time, 
24 min,, 9 sec. Seniors and Fresh- 
men Fail to Place. 

Carpenter '19 as winning man and 
the '18 men as team winners gives 
the results of the Annual Inter-class 
Cross-country run held last Saturday 
By capturing 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 
last places the juniors won the event 
with 29 points against the 33 points 
for the '19 five man team which placed 
1st, 6th, 7th, 9th, and 10th. 

Starting from Freshman field the 
men went over Prexy's Hill, down 
Lover's Lane, EaBt Pleasant street, 
across Pleasant and Fearing streets, 
and down Lincoln avenue, a distance 
of 4.2 miles, finishing on Alumni 
Field between the halves of the Fresh- 
man-Worcester game. 

Lyons '18 got an early start and 
held it for three quarters of the dis- 
tance until forced to slow up with 
pains in his side. For the last quar- 
ter distance Carpenter '19 led, finish- 
ing in 24m., 9sec.,le88 than five yards 
ahead of Lyons. Schwartz "18 was 
third with Gordon "18 a close fourth. 
H. Lyons '20 who finished eighth, 
showed up well for the freshmen. 
The summary : 

Five man team; 1918-29. 1919- 
33. 1917 and 1920 no teams entered. 
1st, Carpenter '19. 
2nd, Lyons '18. 
3rd, Schwartz '18. 
4th, Gordon "18. 
5th, Mitchell '18. 
«tu, Chapin '19. 
7th, Sweeney 'lit. 
8th, Lyons '20. 
9th, Hathaway '19. 
loth. Qoimby '19. 
11th, Hall '19. 
12th, Hamilton '19. 
13th, Jones '20. 
14th, Lambert '20. 
15th, Stackpole '18. 



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72 Madison Ave., Mew Yoik 

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Hoods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 




RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. Maaaachuaetu 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

The Beit Place to Dine 

OOOO Fool) i-koi-KKI.V PHE1*AR«U 

AU Kind* of Sea Food 

60-cent Luncheon from 11-90 to 2 p.m. 

Special Dithei at All Houn 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that it the boys want 

to have their shoes tapped 

with the best quality of 

leather, drop in 

and see 

J. GUV^BUKO 

i 1 l /i Amity Street 



North High 0. Touchdowns Leal 'A 
<amle. Vigezzi. Lothrop. Gray. Goall 
from touchdowns— Dewing :i. Referee 
Kennedy, linpire Btittrlck. Head 
linesman WtStSBM. Time 18-10, VI- 
It). 



The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



PROFESSOR McLEAN TO GO 
TO U. OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Prof. .1. A. McLean, former head 
of the animal husbandry department 
at M. A. C. and superintendent of 
the cattle buildings at the recent 
Springfield National Dairy Show, was 
presented with a for coat as a gift 
from the exhibitors and herdsmen 
entered in the fair. When the news 
became known <>f his expected change 
to take charge of the animal hus- 
bandry department at the University 
of British Columbia, subscriptions 
were solicited and a committee of 
prominent breeders was chosen, to 
make the purchase. 

»12— S, F, Hamblin is teaching 
landscape architecture in Harvard 
University. 



Y. M. C. A. HAS NEW PLAN 

A new idea is to he tried out at 
the Y. M. C. A. meeting to be held 
in the Social Union Room Thursday 
evening at 6-4o. A sort of question 
box will be in order followed hy a 
general discussion. The meeting 
place has been changed so that 
more fellows will drop in after sup- 
per, songs will be sung and the 
entire program will be snappy, en- 
joyable and helpful to all. 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 



For Greatest Satisfaction Um 

IOUBLE SERVICE 
uf omobile Tires 

BotHH 7,000 Wnti ftrjg 




REUNION IN SPRINGFIELD 

A number of 1916 men held their 
first reunion at the Highland Hotel in 
Springfield at 7-30 on the evening of 
Oct. 16. Those present were Moses, 
Huntington, Walker, Hart, Taber, 
Palmer, Perry, and Nicholson. Sara- 
son '13, Black '14 and Cotton Graves 
ex-'16 also attended. After partak- 
ing of the main part of the program, 
plans were talked over for the big 
1916 reunion that is planned for next 
commencement. 



Absolute!/ 

Orabl* the U>leku#« of lta« be" 



•UtxUrd make U re*. 

ThU10Q%tTt»t«<rw . 
tftee naturally ■ tree that i 



SM oS^H'r&S^i 



4ffaMe 

i«ta and niggod load* a* 



well 



country ore* tonga and niggod roada aa *»» 
as on hard paTemenu. They areai leanrrldlnj 
and rr*l llent aa any other pnenmatlo Uia-tM 
ai r space and pressure being the aaroe. „ 

Tney are the mottteonomUKUfai"t»nimf> 
Urea made and are nsed where tlreenmstbo d*- 
ponded on and tire troubleecannotbe iotojavg. 
ktany Doubi* Btrvie* atyle tiro* areln nae In, the 
V. aforemment and Muropean War ferric*. 

Onrontpntle Umltedtoac«rt»»n amount, bat 
for a short lime we offer the followiBfjedoced 
•pecialprlceaaaanJntitHltMjtQryOnerJ 

FBIOK8 

WJa u £ z v) 

li l&TO IS »xb inl 

JU1 ortef eJeemjwt included In ri^**? 
also furnished. Son-skids at 10* Iddlium*' 

Temai PayiBMitwlinprdefeAahr- 
prices, « 10* discount allowed on 
two of more Urea. 
personal checks 
oortlned. 

Try thee* tlree now end 
be conrinced of thfir yery 
high qualities. Sold direct 






THE HARVARD GAME 

< ini'iiiiieii froni page 1} 

his 10-yard mark, and the other go- 
ing from Mi not on the M AC. 40- 
vard line to Gaston on the 5-yard 
niirk. Gaston fumbled when 

tackled, but Davis was on hand and 
fell on the ball four yards from the 
■ ml line. A line plunge carried the 
hall to within three feet, and then 
Hitchcock dove over on the next 
l»la_v with two minutes to go, and 
Home kicked the goal for the final 
point of the game. 

Ffarvilld made its uianv first downs 
largelv through line charging, re- 
Heinhling the old tandem center rush. 
Instead of breaking through the first 
line of the Maroon and White de- 
fensive however, they more fre- 
quently hurdled it. Wide end runs 
were successful when tried, but were 
seldom attempted by either team. 
One first down by rushing was the 
hest the Aggie team could do agaiusi 
the heavv stonewall defense of ihe 
Crimson. 

Captain Grayson, if anv one, was 
the star of the losers. His recovery 
of Pond's punt from the Harvard !*- 
s;iid line to his own 45-yard mark, 
followed by three rushes, netting 
only four yards, brought the hull :is 
Dear th • Harvard line as Aggie ever 
(jot. the play being almost coast unity 

ill ihe Massachusetts half of the Held. 
Casey, the burly right halfback of 
the Crimson, was the bitr man for 
Harvard, scoring three of the touch- 
downs before he was replaced l>v 
Minot in the third quartet . Likius, 
one of the four right ends used hy 
the winners, reeled off a feature play 
in the third period when Whittle, 
after catching a punt in the middle 
of the field, fumbled after a hard 
tackle, and the alert Harvard player 
grabbed the bounding ball at one 
*ide and dashed with a half dozen of 
his team mates at top speed lo the 
A^'ie goal posts, with the nearest 
M A C. contestant trailing SOSSe 
yards behind. 

Coach Melican nsed several suh- 
stitutes, particularly near the close of 
the game, when the men began to 
show signs of exhaustion. 

The summary : 

IIAKVAICO M. A, < . 

I I, r.M.li.li^, Phinnev 

llrewer, le re. Hay. UiehanlNsn 

Wheeler, Davis, li 

Ft, Kdwards, 0, Hlanelianl 
i'l'iimiii, Dean, !u r^. Dunn, Koiwrts 
Harris, Thorndlke, Wlggin, •• 

t, Roberts, Blgstatoinsfl 

' ok, Day, rg li?. Hpauldlnjf 

' Mwr, Hartley, rl It, Hairelsleiti 

Hart, Hatehelder, l.ikin*. 

u'aston, re le, K. (iraysmi 

!i-on. (ianltier, Felton, i|b 

q h. Whittle 
I it het, Ikirnhani. Ilorite, Itt 

rbb, Moynlhait, Holes 
'^y, Minot. Wllleox. rhl. Ihl». Road 
H*»rw MOt Hiteheoek, Hi 

lb. Weeks. fJwdwttt, 

(i. K. Hlatiehanl 

- .•re-Uarvanl, 47. M. A. C. ft 

fi<lowii«-CaHey », HHebwwk i, 

bikma, Tbaoher, (loals from ioii«h- 

•s— Horween rt, Oartliier. Homo 



Hefsree Sdorloe, University oi Pennsyl- 
vania, t'lnpire Full/. Hi'owti. Head 
lliiesinan— l'einllelioi, Howtloin. Field 
iudsre— Mcilrath, B, A, A. Titne ir»- 

niiniiie periods. 



WORCESTER TECH TO PLAY 
ON ALUMNI FIELD SATURDAY 

Next Saturday, M. A. C. plays 
Worcester Tech on Alumni field. 
Not much is known about the rec- 
ord of the Worcester team, but 
Stevens Institute of New Jersey, 
defeated them last Saturday by one 
touchdown. This shows that W. H. 
I. is not a very Btrongteam as Stevens 
is a much lighter eleven. The pros- 
pects for a victory are very bright as 
the Tech team is moie in our class 
than the two previous elevens on our 
schedule. Not many players were 
injured in the Harvard game so that 
liy the end of the week all will be in 
perfect condition. The defects that 
showed up last Saturday in the team's 
play will also be remedied by next 
Saturday. 

The probable lineup : 
u. a. «». w . r*. i. 

Day. r« le, Toinasi 

Kdwards, n It ,Baoaa 

Daun, i'u Ig, Hainan 

KmI. cris, <• ••, Sargent 

Spaulilint;, li> r%, SWirrs 

Holme* or rlagitelatein, ll <t, C'assavanI 

Cray. son. le re, DufJj 

Whittle, <|lt ifb, Morse 

pond, Ihli rhl'. N'filliani 



MdVtiihan or Boles, rbb 
Weeks, fl» 



lhh, Arnold 

Hi, (lalagher 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college men. from $1.50 '° $6.00. 

Ctofut & Knapp. also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 up, 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Keady to-wear Clothes for young men from Alterbury Systeni I ilih 
Ave., from $22.00 U|> 

Made-to-your-measuie Clothes, from $25.00 U P- 

Mr. Campion personally superintends lo rlttion in 
litis d» panmenl and is an expert in the business. 

One ov thk Best Custom Taiiokini; Departments in rHK Stait 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS 6L0VES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Alvvay- glad to see yo". 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW TO BE 
IN FORM OF GARDEN SCENE 

Nov. 11, 12, it nd 13 are the dsys 
jind French Hull the place for the 
Hiinual llower show of the Depart- 
ment of Floriculture. 

The general scheme this venr Is to 
be a gulden scene with pooh* and 
witter scenes as a feature. At each 
end of the long main hal', pergolas 
will l»e plsoed to give vantage points 
for looking over ihe hIiow. Flower 
fiuming.an introduction at the I'hiln- 
delphia ualioiiitl Mower show htht 
spring, will also ho thowo. 

Much of the work will he in charge 
of the floriculture glmtenti with table 
decorations and basket arrangement 
comjwtitions for the .Junior and .Sen- 
ior classes respectively. 

The show will be open Saturday, 
Nov. 11, at I r- m Sunday music 
will he furnished by the college 
orchestra and other attractions will 

be offered. 

For the last two years this show 
has created a great deal of interest 
and many outside visitors Iimvc taken 
the chance to see the department at 
its best, This year the department, 
with its new features and arranfe- 
mcDts expect to offer something far 
nettei than ever before. In connec- 
tion with the flower show the land- 
■cape department is alio showing a 
landscape civic iirt exhibit. 

iB-ciayto»» nsge of so.rviib Q r y g^ p anc « Qgods and Choice Family Groceries 

and wife were on the campus dutiog ' 
the week. 



Burpee's Seeds Grow 

rXDR forty ye#r» we hare rendered faithful teiviee. For forty 

r yean we have tried to make each year'* tervtce more nearly 

ideal. Thai untiring effort haa built for ui not only The WoHd*i 

Largett Mail Order Seed Buaaeta, but alio a World Wall 

reputation for Efficiency and unditputed leaderihip. I hr 

Forlinh Anniver»ary Edition of Burpee'a Annual, thm 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" w brighter and 

better than ever. It i» mailed free. A pottcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Buildingt Philadelphia 



F*«u:C-i fcfttioe Store 

Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 
Kxiwrt **€»psilr»iisy:— B«?a»t leather u«ed 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKALHRS IN 







( 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 






* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday eveuinff 
by the Student's of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OK KIMTOKS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MAK8HAU.O. UM'HKAUU M'lflng Editor 
MII.FORU R. LAWRENCE *n. Aseiitant VMu.r 
WILLIAM SAVILI.K. ,1R. IT, Alumni Editor 



Assoc l a IK KnrroiiN. 

JOHN T. IH/KK 11 

JOSEPH V. WHITNEY M7 
FRANK .1. RINKS IH 

NATHAN W. (ilLLKTTE Ms 

EI)WARI» N. MITCHELL Is 
ELIUT M. UI'KKl'M U 

MYKTON r. EVAN8 '19 



BUSINESS DKl'A HTM KNT. 
MERRILL I'. WARNER <Vt, Huninegu Manager 
JAMES C. POWELL 'IH. 

Aaalatant HuilneaB Manager 

iur»;er R. KOSEOl 1ST -IS. 

Advertialng Manager 



Subscription *2.ihi per year. Single 
copies, H cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

Iu case of ebsngfl of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the luisiness 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered Mieeond-plaaa matter at the Anilient 
Poit Office. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Oct. 24. No. 4 



ARE WE DIFFERENT? 
Does the character of the under- 
graduate body at Afjjiie measure up 
to the standards of other American 
colleges today? One might well he 
inclined either to answer unfavor- 
ably, or, if these standaids are folly 
met, to feel somewhat chagrined that 
they are uot higher elsewhere. Ex- 
amine the basis upon which such 
conclusions may be founded. 

In the first place do 'the members 
of the student body lack respect for 
others? If so, they cannot but be 
termed self-centered, selfish. When 
the president of the college is forced 
to plead, twice within three weeks of 
the opening of school, for a cessation 
of noise in chapel or assembly exer- 
cises when he or some other speaker 
is talking, and even theu his request 
is either forgotten or Ignored at the 
next opportunity.— what else but dis- 
respect can it he called ? Only two 
excuses can be made ; one, that 
colds are very uumerous in times of 
changing weather, and coughing is 
therefore unavoidable. I^et some 
slight self-control be practiced, and 
nine out of ten coughs will be proved 
unnecessary. The other excuse, 
that the tendency is not toward at- 
tention wheu speakers cannot be 
heard. The Collkoian regretfully 
but respectfully must agree that the 
speaking at more than one exercise 
has not been loin I enough to he heard 
throughout the auditorium, and the 
excuse cannot be overlooked. Hut 
lack of attempts at at ention at any 
time whatever are inexcusable and 
undeniably disrespectful. 

Secondly : Does the student body 
as a whole lack seriousness of 
thought or action? Let any outsider 
by chance attend a meeting of one of 
the upper classes, where important 
business must of necessity be settled. 



His impression is that of a bunch of ( 
high school boys, each trying to out- 
do all others in "kiddish" talk and 
actions. There is little opportunity 
or desire to have all sides of a ques- 
lion explained before it is passed. , 
Half the nominations for class or j 
student body officials are made and 
acted on without serious regard for 
efficiency and capability. All sem- 
blance of dignity is generally thrown 
to the winds, Mnob sentiment" pre- 
vails, and best results for class and 
college are lost through the indiffer- 
ence and carelessness of the very 
men who would profit most by more 
serious considerations. 

Thirdly : l>o the members of the 
student body put personal prefer- 
ences before the present or ultimate 
welfare and reputation of the col- 
lege? Take one example only : — the 
matter of individual personal dress 
and appearance. Sweatshirts, fian- 
n-d military shirts, and often, it must 
be frankly confessed, shoes not fit in 
appearance for work in the hack 
yard, make all to frequent appear- 
ances iu the center of the town and 
even in nearby cities. Such adorn- 
ments are noticed more quickly than 
are respectable ones, and are far 
more quickly criticised and remem- 
bered, to the inevitable detriment of 
the value of the public opinion con- 
cerning the college. Let such men 
replace personal comfort and con- 
duet on lines of least resistance with 
personal pride, and pride in their 
college as seen through them as its 
representatives. 

Now to change from the destruc- 
tive to the constructive: How can 
these disagreeable conditions be im 
proved, and the standards raised? 
In many ways, but most effectively 
by thinking on the part of every in- 
dividual in the student body. With- 
out preceding thought, few actions 
can succeed ; without successful ac- 
tions, the standard of character can- 
not be raised, "lie ambitious," but 
be ambitious not for yourself alone, 
but the college you are to call your 
Alma Mater. 



of fraternity support can make him 
successful in his college career. The 
freshman who thinks he has a big 
thing in being a fraternity man must 
take heed lest it make him puffed up ; 
and the man who feels he is left out- 
side should not be blinded to his own 
opportunities. 



MUCH OBLIGED, BOSTON POST 
The Boston PoM of Saturday in- 
cluded this acme of accuracy in the 
pre-write up of the Harvard-Aggie 
game. "The Aggies have been 
buffeted all around New Kngland so 
far this season, sustaining substantial 
trimmings at all the way stations. 
ami it is likely to be a bedraggled 
eleven that faces Mr. Haughton's 
boys this afternoon." 

The alleged "buffeting all around 
New England" was confined to a 
single defeat by Dartmouth. The 
"substantial trimmings at all the 
way stations" was all centralized at 
Hanover. A statement of plurality 
of defeats would be erroneous, but 
with the vivid description it was gen- 
erous. Further on, "The Aggies are 
game to take the punishment that is 
due them, however." Yes, even 
newspaper punishment, like the 
above. Much obliged. Huston I'oxt .' 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our >j>ecialty — And other good tilings ti, c : 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. 41 >w 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKdiri.AK SIAIUV -K.HV1CK AT 7 P. M. 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

(Irown by the Floricultural Dtpt. 

We offer our surplus Mock of >u! 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This Mock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

»*-le|>h<m«- UOO 



MASS. 



18 IT THE WHOLE THINOP 
To have "made" a fraternity teemi 
to the average freshman an event in 
itself. I V\ so doing be thinks be has 
carved for himself a little niche in 
the hull of fame wherein he may rest 
comfortably for four years and watch 
the struggling college world pass by. 
Hut he is due for a sure and sudden 
fall. No fraternity has taken in tt« 
men for parlor ornaments and now 
expect its new pledges to go out 
and do something. Then there is the 
man who did not pledge. He too has 
little problems to solve but he has no 
reason to feel blue, for although suc- 
cess in college may be aided by fra- 
ternity membership it is by no means 
dependent upon it. If a man has 
the push and determination he can 
get whatever he goes after ; if he is 
lazy and without ambition, no amount 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for thl» column ■houlrt be dropped In 
at the Cnu.KiiiAi* office or handed to Satlmn 
W.<;Ulette'lH on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each issue. I 

WlDSKSIiAV, 1>. I. -'•"• 

2-1(1 P, M. Assembly. George \V. Cole- 

man, director of Ford Hall 
Foundation, Boston, 

ti-4.". r. m. -M'urobioiotf.v elate meeting, 
Trophy room. 

u-45 r. m.— Stock bridge club, Stock- 
bridge ball, Boon 114. 

7-00 P. *.— Dramatic clttb oieetlng, 
NiH-ial Inioii. 

9-00 p. m. -Senior class theater party, 

Noilbamploii Academy of 
music. 
Tin FMDAl Oct. *». 

•M.*> I-. m.— Y. M. <•. A. Informal meet- 
ing in Social I'nioii. 

7-00 i». M.— Florist's and Gardner's club 
meeting, French hall. 
Fitinw, th*r. '21. 

8-J5 v. m.— Mandolin club rehearsal, 
Social Vnion. 

MK) ]•, m.— llalliday WitherspooU, war 
eorrenjMjndenl, StuckbridRe 
hall, under auspices of 
Hoeial Onion. 

8 ATI! BOA Y, Hit, 'Z*. 

2-30 r, m— Fresh ma n Football. M0 
wm Motisoti ai Monson. 

;WH! p. m.— Varsiiy football, M. A, C. vs 
Worcester Tech at Alumni 

ticbl. 
TrKfPAV, 1»«T. St, 

B-4« P. m.— Olee elub rehearsal, i Ud 
V Impel, 



FRESHMAN-SOPH TENNIS 
Nineteen-nineteen challenged 1820 
to a tennis tournament Wednesday. 
Kach class is to enter a four-men 
team, the best three out of five 
matches will decide the contest. The 
first match will be played Saturday 
morning. 



MASS. — 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



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38 YEARS of LEADERSHIP 



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pMtffbte greater UfcnfcCtty, cleaner gkliniiiiiiit 
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with an* other machine. 

The driving mechanism of the LH» l,»»»I '» 
jterfeetlr oiled and the bowl run* M "•"* 
r»need. all of which I* conducive to the Mitt 
life of the machine. A l»e |.:n.il «iH '»*» 
from 1% to iii fmTti while the life 0< 
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■tone li left unturned by the lie Law! I mh* 
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More He I .aval* are aold •very N> 
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CAMPUS NOTES 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J, Watts are re- 
ceiving congratulations on the birth 
of a son Monday morning. 

Why not start a little legislation to 
put a new latch on the door to thr- 
Drill Hall locker room. The old one 
is a relic. 

Quite a number of students arc 
earning mone\ for the Tufts trip by 
picking apples and stripping tobacco. 
Moral, "Be There." 

Our old friend the coul truckh:is :i 
little playmate, as it now tows another 
truck in its wake, all of whieli helps 
to heat the dorms, sometimes. 

Richmond M. Jackson ex-' 17 is at 
the Missionary Institute, Nyaek, N. 
V. preparing, as he sayB, for the 
Christinn Service in the mission field. 

J. T. Dizer '17 filled a lecture ap- 
pointment for the floriculture depart* 
ment hist week when he addressed 
the South Deerfield Woman's Cluh 
on the subject of "Hullts and their 
outdoor culture." 

'in Hfiount of J. I). Rirch&rd's 
withdrawal from college, B new truck 
captain is to be elected, and Manager 
Flint has sent ballots to last year's 
letter men. The returns will proba- 
bly be in next week. 

A large and appreciative audience 
saw the second moving picture enter- 
tainment of the year in Stockbi idge 
Hall Friday evening, when the two 
five-reel features, "The Conqueror" 
and "Let Katy Do It," were shown. 

At Davenport, la.. Friday Profes- 
sor Waugh of M. A. C. npoke on 
landscape architecture before the 
Rotary Club, an association of busi- 
ness men of that city. He spent Sat- 
urday in Chicago conferring with 
prominent landscape architects. 

The nearest to an informal the 
Drill Hall will see for a few weeks 
occurred last Tuesday night when a 
student orchestra furnished music for 
a recording breaking wax tread to put 
the floor in good dancing condition. 
The coeds especially enjoyed the 
novelty of the affair. 



LANDSCAPE CLUB OFFICERS 

A meeting of the Landscape Art 
Club was held in Wilder Hall Friday 
for the election of new officers. Fkrle 
M, Randall *17 was elected president, 
Richard W. Smith vice-president, and 
Roland W. Rogers secretary and 
treasurer. It was voted to have the 
ly elected officers act as a com- 
mittee to secure speakers for the 
coming year. 



10 FORM ECONOMICS CLUB 

The formation of a new elub in 
agricultural economics is being oon- 
lideietl by students majoring under 
I>r. Canes, It is intended that the 
iJiHtingg of the club, in which im- 
]>*• taut economic problems will be 
discussed, will supplement the class- 
rottiti work and add interest to the 
Courses in economics. An anoounce- 
'"• -if will be made soou. 



SURVEYING MOUNT TOBY 

Forestry Students Aiding. Forest to 

be Made Source of Practical Work. 

To Erect Saw Mill. 

The work of surveying the Mount 
Toby Reservation, previous to the 
property being taken over bv the State, 
has been going OH for some time, and 
is now practically complete. .Mr. M. 
11. Patteaon, a Northampton Civil 
Kngineer, has been superintending 
the work and with the party are Fred 
Larsen '17, and Kdward Searls, a 
special .student of the college. 

It is the wish of Professor Clark, 
head of the forestry department that 
the college do for the forests what it 
has done for agriculture iu general, 
iu that the woodlands need looking 
after by men who understand how to 
make the right kind of trees grow on 
certain kinds of soil. About ?>()'/„ of 
the html in the country is covered 
with timber, scrub oak, or brush of 
some sort, and all of this land that is 
now going to waste could be used to 
advantage in growing good trees. 

Such knowledge as is needed for 
this purpose can be readily obtained 
from a tract of land like the Ml. 
Toby forest, and, furthermore, with 
the possibility of the erection of a 
small sawmill at the entrance of the 
land, a complete and verv practical 
training can be given in the subject 
of forestry. In fact, the course will 
include the growth of trees from the 
time thev are planted to the time 
when thi'V tire ready to be shipped for 
lumber in the form of boards. 



PRACTICAL FOREST WORK 

The course in forestry offered to 
the students of M. A. C. is, iu every 
sense of the word, practical. From 
the lime when I he course commeuces 
with the study of the names of trees 
to the point when the men have 
finished their under-graduate work 
in this subject, and have learned all 
that is possible to teach students in 
two years of college, it is nearly all 
practice and not theory. Of course 
there is more or less to be learned 
from books about any study, but 
along with this hook-knowledgs there 
is the opportunity for the men to see 
the theory worked out. For instance, 
at the prevent time the Seniors who 
are majoring in forestry are estima- 
ting the stand and value of growing 
trees, and also how to grow them to the 
best advantage. They are also learn- 
ing how to tell the different uses to 
which certain kinds of wood are best 
adapted, their strength values, and 
methods of preservation, both be- 
fore and after the wood is sawed and 
planed. Although up to the present 
time the work in this department ha* 
been very practical, the acquisition 
of the Mt. Toby RcMTvation will 
mean that 50 per cent, more practi- 
cal work can be done. 



1914 NOTES 

A. S. Thurston is now head of the 
the department of truck crops and 
floriculture at Iowa State College. 

Leone K. Smith has severed his 
connection with the Colchester Boys 
Club and has started agricultural 
teaching and boys' club work at 
Pittsford, Vt. Announcement has 
also been received of his marriage on 
Sept. 2. at Winchester. 

F. W. Small has resigned as dairy- 
man at Michigan Aggie and has 
taken up other dairy work in Michi- 
gan, 

Lincoln, Ingram, Fuller, Fat Tay- 
lor, Hetmrd, Morse and Webster 
were at the Dairy Show recently. 

Kilburn cx'l I was also seen at the 
show. He is still managing a farm 
in Lancaster. 

R. W. Harris took several prizes 
at the Dairy Show on Brown Swiss 
cattle. 

R. K. Nute announces the birth of 
a daughter Oct. 17. 

M. (J. Tarbell is a construction 
engineer with the Massachusetts 
Highway Commission. 

('. M. Allen is working at Barnet, 
Canada and reports that Western 
Canada is certainly a wonderful coun- 
try . 

Stan Freeborn has been investiga- 
ting the malarial mosrpiito iu Not th- 
em California and reports that "Cal- 
ifornia never looked better." 

Harold Morse, salesman for Coe- 
Motimer Co., has transferred from 
Pennsylvania to Western Mass. 

"Ted" Nieolet wishes to announce 
a change in his position to take affect 
Nov. I. Having been with P. R. 
Zicgler Co. of Boston for the past 
two and a half years, he has just ac- 
cepted a position in the state depart- 
ment of the Oeueral Fire Kxting- 
uisher Co. of Providence, K. I., to 
handle the "Griunell Automatic 
.Sypho-chemical Sprinkler System" 
which is now ready for market. 



INFORMAL POSTPONED 

Owing to the fact that a two-weeks' 
quarantine exists iu Smith and Mt. 
Holyoke colleges, the informal sched- 
uled for Oct. 28 has been postponed 
to Nov, 11. 



R. Stanley Leonard *I8, of Mel- 
rose ha* pledged Lambda Chi Alpha. 



M. A. C. HEARING 

1 1 on! inin-ii from pair* tj 

who spoke were Worthington ( . Ken- 
nedy *15, Dana O. Merrill *17, Harold 
T. Phelps of West Brookfield, H. A, 
Parsons of Amherst, and V. P. New- 
kirk of Fiasthampton. 

The commission of five men were 
Dr. Seelye, chairman, William P. 
Birnie *71 of Springfield, William 
Whiting of Holyoke, Charles S. Bur- 
bank, commissioner of economy and 
efficiency, and Payson Smith slate 
commissioner of education. The 
fourth and last hearing is being held 
at the state house in Boston today. 



THE 



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iteat'h, Lincoln and Kingston Bti . 
BOSTON, flASS. 



Only two blocks from South Terminal Sta 
lion, anil eiiHily icai-lu-it from North Htntlou 
by Klnviitfd Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the a real retail ilnipH ami luislnc-.-. rcnlic. 
also in the theutiCH unit iiluce.s nf IntereHt. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table unit service iiimiiriiiissetl. 

IIiii'U lei ami map sent upon application. 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. H1CKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for ilstdl. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



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amherst furniture 
carpetIooms 

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College Stationery 

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Magazines, Newspapers 
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A. J. HASTINGS 

Ne w sdealer and Stationer 






( ■■ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



TO RUN WORCESTER TECH 

Cross Country Team has First Meet 

Next Saturday. To End on 

Alumni Field 

The college will l>e given its first 
opportunity to see the cross country 
team in action on Saturday next, 
when it will compete in Amherst with 
the W. P. I. aggregation. Captain 
Francis of Tech is running strong, 
but his team was badly defeated by 
Brown last week. 

The course this year is to be 
lengthen id from four and one-half to 
five miles, and the fiuish will be on 
Alumni field between the halves 
of W. P. I. game. Manager Flint 
is planning to run eight men, and 



*17; Lyons, Swartz, Gordon and 
Bainbridge *18 ; Carpenter, Sweeney 
and Chapin '19. 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Mr. Fred B. Freeman, secretary of 
county work, international Y. M. C. 
A . gave a forceful speech to the stu- 
dent body at Wednesday assembly, 
in which for u text he used the idea 
expressed in the utterance of one 
who has become head of Y. M. C. 
A. work in India, to the effect that he 
is almost ashamed he is an American 
when he returns from India and looks 
upon the extravagance of the Amer- 
ican people made possible by the 
European war. 



progress, Christianity. We might 
realize what the last means if we 
could see how the lack of it is affect- 
ing Turkey, Armenia, the Balkans 
and all Europe today. 



JUNIOR PROM COMMITTEES 

The class of 1918 at a special met t- 
ing held last Wednesday night, 
elected the following men to be the 
committee in charge of the Junior 



There are great problems to be | p ro m : Marshall O. Lanphear, Wind 
solved by future Americans: battling; j 8 or, Conn. ; John J. Maginuis, Law- 
the controversity between capital 
and labor, checking the kind of lead- 
ership which is fostered by prosperity, 
allowing the waste of the virility of 
country communities. These and 
many other problems must be solved 
bv Man a being which if brokeu 



In his address he said that to be an 
on account of the ineligibility of i American meant in this time of inter- 
Mitchell '18 the team will be com- national strife to bear great respousi- 
posed of the following men : Bell bilities, meant liberty, leadership, 



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DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block. Amherst, Mass. 

office Hoam 9 to \'J a. hi.. I -»t t<>. r . i>. in. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes streets, three 
blocks from the Union D*oot, i* • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just 4 step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up: rooms 
with bath (single) SI. ft" and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
mom 'iuk»> a meal a pleasant memorv— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked «*d 
serv<td in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers uf Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
and Fittings for steam. Water and lia«. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. r*i|» 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems. Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - Holyoke, Mass. 



Candies and Ice Cream 



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Agricultural Books 

and Filing Cases 



dowu into its elemental constitutents 
would be worth SI. 80 on today's 
market. The greater need is not 
money, nor more business, nor better 
agriculture, nor a larger army and 
navy, nor better education, but Men ! 
The best t\pe of man is houesi, 
loyal, pernistant, moral and princi- 
pled, is master of himself and will 
ring true when the grind comes. 



reuce ; WellB N. Thompson, Adams; 
Sidney S. Smith, Boston ; John A. 
Chapman, Salem ; Foster K. Baker, 
Fairhaven ; Harlan N. Wortblev, 
Greenwood. 



SENIOR THEATRE PARTY 

Quite an unusual event will take 
place Wednesday night in Northamp- 
ton. The whole senior class of M. 
A. C. headed by class captain Hill 
who originated the idea and made all 
preparations, will goto see the North- 
ampton Players in "Hulling Stones " 
A special car will l»e used to carry 
the seniors to and from "Hamp." 



BABBITT & WGODWORTH 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 



IJARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., Exeter and majrden SU., Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the chy. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY. Prop. 



F. A 




BIG WILSON RALLY 

To Discuss President's Platform and 
Policies. Lawaon Purdy of New 

York to Speak. 
Woodrow Wilson, his platform and 
policies will be the main subject at a 
l»ig rally to be held in College Hall 
under the auspices of the Wilson In- 
dependent League of Amuerst Friday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Lawson l'urdy, 
tax commissioner of New York City 
will be the principal speaker. Mr. 
Purdy is a graduate of Trinity college 
and oH of the funinost authorities 
on taxation in the United States. 
Among others who will speak for 
President Wilson is Charles H. Jones 
of Boston, president of the Com- 
monwealth Shoe and Leather Com- 
pany, and of the Wilson Independent 
League. Mr. Jones was formerly a 
republican and later a leader in the 
progressive movement in Massachu- 
setts. He is now an ardent supporter 
of the democratic nominee. Rep- 
resentative men on the faculties 
of both colleges have declaied them- 
selves independent in politics but 
strong for Wilson and about twenty 
have joined with the Wilson clubs of 
Amherst and M. A. C. in boosting 
Friday night's rally. Ray Staunard 
Baker, the well known writer, has 
been chosen president of the Inde- 
pendent League of the town, and Pro- 
fessor Spragueof M. A. C. secretary. 



MORE INDEX DOPE 

Of course you've all noticed Fuller 
cairving his little black box arouml. 
He never goes out without it Do 
you realize what that means? It 
means that those countless pictures 
he has been taking will appear in the 
1918 Index. It's going to be a real 
picture book, something that lias 
never been seen at Aggie. Snapshots 
of the professors in character poses, 
new campus views, dozens of snaps 
of individuals and groups represent- 
ing all classes. Be sure and 
look for your picture, for its there 
somewhere. And say lioys, there's 
some corkers of the co-eds, not 
as they appear when entertaining 
Bud. Cliff or Bob. but natural 
ones, showing them as they really 
aie You'll find your old friend 
Cream de Meridor there. You'll find 
all the incident! of the banquet sea- 
son and picture scrap, in detail. Ib 
fact you won't have to read a word 
to get twice your money 'a worth. f«*i 
there are snapshots enough to amuse 
vou for a week. Remember this — 
there's a picture of vou sonrewheie ! 

Jrfp. 



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No. i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mas*. 



"AM I A FIT?" ASKS 1920 

"This coat it too tight for me, I 
can't hook the collar," announced a 
freshman to the official tailor of the 
Aggie army last Monday, "It clings 
perfectly" countered Sergeant Lee, 
"next!" In this efficient manner HO 
new drill suits were approved, and 
the proud but squeezed rookies strut- 
ted out over the campus. The sight 
of a bevy of frosh coming in to sup- 
per in drill suits on a Monday evoked 
considerable mirth from the Draper 
Hall boarders. The intense love for 
drill indicated by a fondness for the 
uniforms augurs well for preparedness 
at Aggie — hut wait — perhaps they 
couldn't unbuttonthem. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

*o,-,_ Professor H. F. Tompson »f 
Arlington was elected vice-president 
of the Vegetable Grower! Associa- 
tion of America at their ninth annual 
convention held during September in 
Washington. 

•11 —Herbert W, Blsney Iim 
moved from Blooraington, III . to 
enter a partnership with his brother, 
Jonathan P., M, A, C. 1910. ui.-br 
the firm name of Blaney A BlaBtTi 
landscape architects, with offices at 
8 Beacon St., Boston. 

*I2— Alden C. Brett has bwo »|>- 
pointed deputy inspector for Bostoo 
and southwestern MawaclnmeW 
under the new apple grading law, 

•].">— Mert Lane is to tesch iefca»l 
in Glastonbury, Conn., this winter, 
after spending a summer ■■ Mfftety 
inspector with the Maas. State Bowd 
of Agriculture. 



WILSON CLUB HOLDS FORTH 

President Wilson's policies were 
upheld in good measure at tonight's 
rally of the Wilson Club where Dean 
Lewis gave a vigorous address in de- 
fence of the admistratiou. Other 
speakers were Lewis T. Buck man '17, 
of Wilkes Banc Pa., who discuss- 
ed the Adamson law, and Louis W. 
Boss '17 of Arlington whose sub- 
ject was Wilson's Mexicau policy. 



'15 — Vincent Sauchelli is working 
on a coffee and rubber plantation lo- 
cated at Kuala Lumpur. Federated 
Malay States. 



Fred A. Carlson MS, of Pittsfield 
has pledged Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 



TO WRITE FOR STANDARD 

This year the work of the rural 
journalism students is to receive much 
more prominence than ever before. 
For some time the department has 
published the Bay State Ituralixt, g 
page of popular rural interests iu ihe 
Springfield Union, but this year the 
N«V> Bedford Standard offers to 
make a feature of the department's 
work in their editions. Such publi- 
city, without doubt, speaks well for 
the efficiency of the students of this 
course. 



HOURS AT INFIRMARY 
Regular visiting hours are now 
observed at the infirmary. Visitors 
aie requested to confine their calls 
within the periods of 4 n and 6-80, 
8-30 p. M. 



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LOCALLY: 5a Center St., Northampton Mass., 

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Write to Local Agency Manager 

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8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 1916. 



NEW BOOKS IN LIBRARY 



The following books* have been 
recently added lot he Col lege Library ; 
Rmnaon Alcott's Fruitlands by Clara 
Kmlicott Sears ; The Hook of Handy 
Flowers, H. H.Thomas; Luther Bur- 
Imnk, His Life and Work, Henry 
Smith Williams, M. D., L. L. I). ; 
Interior Decoration, Frank Alvah 
1'arsons ; Beautiful Gardens in 
America, Louise Shelton ; The Archi- 
tecture and Landscape Gardening of 
the Exposition, Louis Christian AIull- 
gardt ; Gardeuing in California, John 
McLaren; Continuous Bloom iu 
America, Louise Shelton; Jewish 
Life iu Modern Times, Israel Cohen ; 
Chrysanthemums and How to Grow 
Them, I. J. Powell; Inexpensive 
Homes of Individuality, Henry H. 
Savior ; My Growing Garden, J. 
Horace McFailand ; Through College 
on Nothing a Year, Christian Gauss ; 
The Wild Turkey and Its Hunting, 
Kdward Mcllhenny ; Its Causes and 
Cures, Thomas Speed Moshy ; Farly 
American Cruftsmen. Walter A. 
Uvey ; Japan's Real Attitude Toward 
America ; Antwerp to Gallipoli, 
Arthur Buhl; Strictly Business, and 
The Four Million, bv O. Henry ; The 
State as Farmer, George Radford ; 
From the Letter-Files of S. W. John- 
son, Elizabeth A. Osborne; The 
American Country Girl, Martha 
Foote Crow ; Men of the Old Stone 
Age, Henry Fairfield Osborn. 

Mr. C. F. W. Felt, a graduate of 
M. A. C, and now concerned with 
the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railway, has recently given to the 
library a complete set of the "Journal 
of the Association of Engineering 
Societies" ranging from 1881 to the 
present date. He had the fifty odd 
volumes nicely bound in brown cloth 
which adtls to the interest and value 
of the splendid gift to the library. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTA1N PENS 

i * _ _ i 



Oilers onuses .if instruction in tw.-nty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science* 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's 



Swans 



Waterman's 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural journalism 



Floriculture 

Forcstiy 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Economics 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select from, 



OUR RULE 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated uooklet, wute 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

Al. A. C Athletic Fie d Association 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Aesociation, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index. 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
11. K. Bobbin*, Manager 
Li T. Buckman, President 
R. L. Holdeu, Manager 
R. L>. Hawley, Manager 
(J. S. Flint, Manager 
M. R. Lawreuce, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams, Manager 
1). It. Lipshires, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
I). O. Merrill, President 
E. L. King, President 
L. T. Bucktnau, President 
M.J. McNamara. President 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We cany the largest stock in the 
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MODERN REPAIR DEPT, 



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CARS 

Leave A(MJIE COLLEGE lor HOI- 
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CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOQIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 



Ther« »wS*?S1 l»)i K»wotnwhy you should 
buy your 



Dartmouth's new president, Ernest 
Martin Hopkins, L. L. D. took office 
Friday, Oct. 9. The inauguration 
program covered a peiiod of two 
days. Many alumni returned for 
the occasion, 

Middlebury college is to organize 
an outing club. The clob will pro- 
mote out-door sporta especially skiing 
and gnow-shoeing. Shelters will be 
built In the mountains so parties may 
stav ovet night. 

Brown University will give sixteen 
extension com sea the first semester 
for the benefit of the people in Provi- 
deuce and vicinity. The work will 
begin Nov. 6 and ten lectures will be 
given in each course. 

Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology will have a reorganization of 
its engineering eorpa. The corp* 
will come more directly under the 
supervision of the war department. 
All the unit* of an engineering corps 
as they exist in. the regular army will 
be duplicated at the institute. The 
government will furnish the equip- 
ment and a series of lectures will be 
given. 



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or 

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S COUEGTAN 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 31, 1916. 



No. 5 



MAROON AND WHITE GETS 
7-0 DECISION OVER W.P.I. 

Fumbling and Penalties Make Game 
Slow. Score in Third Period. 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA WINS 
AWARD FOR SCHOLARSHIP 

Has High Average Per Cent of 78,2. 

Competition Close Among All 

of Fraternities. 



In the second home game of the 
season, M. A. C. defeated W.P.I, iu a 
loosely played contest Saturday by the 
score of 7-0. Neither team seemed 
able to take advantage of the breaka 
and show scoring power when the 
chance was offered. Fumbling and 
penalties spoiled many of the good 
plays of the game as all long runs 
were made useless when the ball was 
brought back. 

The Aggie team scored their touch- 
down iu the third quarter after ■ 
series of first downs gained by 
straight rushing and a successful for- 
ward pass, Pond to Day. M. A. 0. 
had many othei chances to score only 
to lose the ball by fumbling or on 
downs. Worcester Tech caused no 
trouble until the fourth quarter when 
Needham intercepted a forward pass 
and waa downed by Hagelstein on 
Aggie's 30-yard line after a long 
chase down the field. 

Goodwin and Boleain the backfield 
and Edwards and Dunn in the line 
played well for M. A. C. and Aggie's 
ends were always on the job. For 
Worcester, Needham, Welsh and 
Arnold excelled as they were in the 
thick of he game at all times. Wor- 
cester's backfield was much faster 
than the M. A. C. players and always 
got away fast but the Aggie line was 
far superior to the visitors. 

M. A, I. ». "'■ »• 

i; < iiarils.m, k. Gray son, la 

re, Duffy, liurner 
r.liuifhanl, IbmelHlein, It 

ft, W'Hlidi.Sll.IH' 

Kpanldlng, Ig Id Btowi 

Roberts, <• <•• Ceafield 

Uinm, r« 1«, M..-.sl»ru 

Kdwardd, rt H, Bamm 

hay, re le. TonmsM 

Winnie, K, (iiHVHi.H, qb <d>, How 

i u ray son, Pond, fen rhi., Needham 

Mark, Boles, rlil. llil». Arnold 

fioodwin, fb fh. «alla«tii«r 

Snow .M. \.< .7, Worcester Tech u. 

[Yitu-hdown— Day. fJosJ frntii toneh- 
<lnwn— K. (irayson. Umpire Farmer 

•f Dart month. Referee Johnaoa ,,f 

N'riiitflield. Head linesman Ketmob 

\ mberat. Time — JO-minute quartet*. 



At the meeting of the interfrater- 
nity conference last Thursday even- 
ing, the scholarship cup for the year 
1915-1916 was awarded to Lambda 
Chi Alpha, who had the excellent 
average of 78.2 percent, one tenth of 
a point ahead of Theta Chi, their near- 
est rival. But three and six-tenths 
points separated the highest compet- 
itor from the lowest, which is consid- 
ered a reraarkibly fine showing. 
The fraternity averages were as 
follows : 



cross country run with COMMITTEE HOLDS FINAL 



I'tTt I'll' 

78.2 

78.1 

77.7 

77 

76.7 

76.7 

75.5 

75.1 

74.6 



Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Theta Chi, 
Sigma Phi Kpsilon, 
Kappa Sigma, 
Q. T. V M 
Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Kappa Gamma Phi, 
Beta Kappa Phi, 
Alpha Sigma Phi, 

The committee on scholarship waB 
insli noted to purchase a suitable 
cup, the cost not to exceed f 1«, and 
to present it to the winner. A motion 
was passed providing that the frater- 
nity having in its possession a cup 
awarded to it by the conference 
should keep it in .epair. It was de- 
cided that the bulletin boards referred 
to iu the "penalty" article of the 
conference constitution should* be 
those in Stockbridge and French halls 
and the library, and that the notices 
should remain on the bulletins three 
weeks. It was further decided to 
have the rushing rules read in the 
fraternity meetings to effect any 
desired changes, especially along the 
following lines: 1— The phrase "No 
upperclassmau shall speak to a fresh- 
man after »5 p. m. Sunday," to read 
"No representative of a fraternity 
shall speak," etc. *, 2— Shoitening of 
the rushing season, also the desira- 
bility of accepting excuses for 
absence from conference meetings. 
The next meeting will be held Nov. 
-_\ at which time the annual due* are 
{ to be paid- 



WORCESTER TECH A DRAW 

Three W. P. I. Men Loaa Course. 

Lyons Finishes First in Fast 

Time of S7:4. 

Because three Worcester men, 
Crossmau. Babbitt and (Joddard, 
lost the course iu Saturday's cross 
country run, the event had to be 
called a draw, although Lyons of M. 
A. C. was the first man to finish the 
whole distance iu the fast time of 27 
minutes, I seconds. Frauds of 
W. P. I. came in II seconds latet . 
Baiubtidge and Dell of Al. A. C. 
were the uext to linish, followed by 
Doolittle of Tech, Cordon, Chapin 
and Schwartz of AI. A. C, Butler of 
Tech, Sweeuey of Al. A. C. and 
liredenberg of Tech in order. 
Sweeuey made a game fight against 
liredenberg, passing him in the last 
200 yards and holding a small lead 
over him at the finish. 

The three W. P. I. men who 
caused the decision of a draw were 
considerably behind the main group 
at the start and did not see the guide 
flags placed in the woods back of the 
^resident's house. They took a path 
which proved to be three-quarters of 
a mile shorter than the regular 
course, bringing them iu at the liuish 
several minutes ahead of the others. 
Coach Dickinson therefore saw no 
other fair way of settling the question 
than by declaring the race a draw. 



ELECT TEAM MANAGERS 
At a recent aophomore class raeet- 



LYONS ELBCTBB CAPTAIN 
Uuls M. Lvons '18 of Rockland 
was recently elected captain of the 
Paul Faxon of West Newton was cro8S . col , ni rv team. Lyons is a 
■ -hosen manager of the class football , nem ber of the Lambda Chi Alpha 
team and Frank Hall of Rockland, fraternity, and ha* run on the varsity 
manager of the class rifle team. j croaa-oonntrf team for two yw«, 



DID NOT HAVE BIG SALE 

Only Eighty-seven Buy Tickets lor 
"Aggie Night" Show 
Manager Williams has succeeded 
in selling eighty-seven ticket! »'» 
"Sybil," the musical comedy which 
will be the attraction for Aggie stu- 
dents at the Colonial in Boston Sat- 
urday night. The showing made 
was somewhat a disappointment to 
lh« promoters of the plan for a big 
♦'Aggie Night," such as was held 
last year, and no attempt will be 
made to decorate or do anything out 
of the ordinary at the affair. Alumni 
who are returning for the game have 
been urged to join the undergradu- 
ates in attending the show. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB NOTICE 
Prof. J. C. AIcNutt, majot advisor 
in animal husbandry, will address 
the Stockbridge Club al the regular 
meeting Wednesday evening, Nov. 8. 
He will talk on his personal experi- 
ence!. 



INVESTIGATION HEARING 

Dr. A. C. True ol Bureau of Agri- 
culture Speaks. Usual Criti- 
cism from Mr. Shirley. 

Public hearings for the investiga- 
tion of the college and its policies are 
over ; the evidence as far as public 
sentiment if concerned is all in ; ami 
the co«mi— JOO will uow continue its 
work along personal lines. 

The last of the hearings was held 
in Boston last Tin-sdny, Oct. 2o, with 
Dr. A C. True of Washington, !>.<'• 
head of the national bureau of agri- 
culture as the principal speaker. In 
the main his attitude was very favor- 
able toward the college. He pointed 
out niMiiy of the strong |K>ints and 
suggested I few change*. 

K. L Richardson of Millis, an old 
alumnus of M. A. C. spoke in high 
terms of the college and expressed 
trie belief that the state puts too mm-h 
on the college president and trustees 
hv making them appear every yt'ar 
to get any appiopriaiions. 

Hev Dr. Frederick E. Kmmerich of 
the HaM. Hoot Missionary society, 
II. .1. Wheeler *U and F. D. (irigga 
13 also spoke for the college. 

Speaking against the college W . 
II, Noble critieized the entrauce 
standards! {||,! educating of out of 

State studentH. the standing of recent 
graduates, the faculty, and every- 
thing in general. In his scope, Air. 
Shirley, another critieizer of the col- 
lege, coveted an much ground aa Mr. 
Noi.le. In a statement filed by him 
he claimed that the agricultural col- 
lege had failed to give practical in- 
Htrtution and that lew than l"i per 
cent of the graduates of the last live * 
vears have become Massachusetts 
farmers. The dormitories, dining 
hall and military department also 
came under his hammer. 

A general review of the hearings 
reveals several outstanding feature*. 
The first is the numlier of hitherto 
unknown friends of the college who 
have I'tapOiltllwl lO the appeal for pub- 
lic sentiment. The second is the ap- 
parent inability to keep personal gtiet- 
ances from entering into a discussion 
i of policy. The third is the differ- 
( nre of opinions as to what the eol- 
I lege should do and how it should do 
!it; and the last is the general con 
structive criticism so desired by the 
I college, which baa been given by 
most of the beat speakers. 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



WAR CORRESPONDENT TELLS 

OF LIFE AMONG MEXICANS 

"Mexico and the Mexicans" was 
the subject chosen by Halliday 
Witherspoon, War Correspondent, 
when he spoke to an appreciative 
uudieuce in the Auditorium Friday 
evening. He said in part : 

Five years ago Mexico, which is 
the treasure house of the world, 
iu metals and agriculture, and beau- 
tiful in Bcenery, was a peaceful coun- 
try. Now it is in a state of revolt. 
Much of the trouble that comes to a 
Mexican is due to his simplicity and 
carelessness. His motto "Never do 
today what you can put off until to- 
morrow" very aptly expresses his at- 
titude toward business. Further- 
more, be is cruel, not intentionally, 
but iu a sort of unconscious or care- 
less way, it being only the upper clas- 
ses who are purposely cruel. Another 
trait of the Mexican, also a univer- 
sal one, is his love of destruction. 
This fact was very plainly shown at 
Vera Cruz where nearly all the bom- 
barding was done merely to cause 
destruction of property. 

Although the average Mexican mind 
is immature and angers easily he is a 
good sort, and very quickly repents 
of his fault. At the same time, it is 
a necessary thing that a Mexican 
have a master for as soon as he gets 
the upper hand his presence is al- 
most unbearable. For thirty yearB 
Mexico had a master in Diaz, and in 
that time he made a great improve- 
ment in the country as a whole. The 
first ten years was spent in downing 
the revolutions and restoring peace 
to the country ; the next ten, in fur- 
thering such projects as establishing 
railroads and making other modern 
improvements ; and the last ten he 
devoted to the education of the peo- 
ple, at which time schools sprang up 
all over the country. 

In 1910, as a result of the educa- 
tional movement, a middle class ap- 
peared and became dangerous on ac- 
count of their superior knowledge. 
At this time Huerta came into power 
but be was misunderstood by the 
people and therefore could not help 
them very much. It was a great 
misfortune that the United States did 
not recognize Huerta and support his 
theories, for the latter probably 
would have resulted in abetter Mexi- 
can government. 

As to the present situation, there 
are certain reasons why the United 
States should not interveue in the 
affairs of Mexico. First, the sol- 
diers who are now on the border 
are costing us two million dollars a 
day and in the case of war this 
would be inn-eased to fix million, or 
more than a billion a year. Second, 
the loss of life would be enormous, 
in that nearly the whole affair would 
be guerilla ware-fare, and it would 
be two or three yearn before peace 
would be declared. Lastly, the 
United States has no moral right 
to take such a step, for a government 



like ours could not possibly apply 
to a nation like Mexico. However, 
there seems very little chance of 
the United States taking any snch 
measures unless pressed into it by 
some of the other countries after 
the great war is over in Europe. 

After closing his talk, Mr. Wither- 
spoon answered a number of ques- 
tions such as, "Did Huerta have any- 
thing to do with the death of 
Madero?" the answer being "No; 
and "Could Villa be held personally 
responsible for the raid at Columbus?" 
to which he answered "Yes ;" after 
which he went on to explain why both 
of these answers were true. 



FRESHMAN WIN OVER OLD 
RIVALS, MONSON ACADEMY 

In the annual M. A. C. freshman- 
Monson academy football game, 
played Saturday afternoon on the 
Monson field, the Aggie youngsters 
defeated their rivals 12 to 7. The 
freshmen were far superior to their 
opponents, especially in kicking, 
when Dewing's punts gained consid- 
erable advantage for his team with 
every interchange of kicks. The 
1920 men started the game with a 
rush. Lent receiving the kickoff, and 
carrying it to the enemy's 15-yard 
line. Monson resisted stubbornly, 
but Lent finally plunged over the 
last while line for the first score. 
Dewing's try for a goal failed. In the 
second quarter the freshman scored 
again when McLeod broke through, 
blocked a punt, and fell on the ball 
behind the goal line. Toward the 
end of the third quarter Monson took 
the ball from the middle of the field 
almost to the goal line. The Aggie 
youngsters resisted the attack for 
three downs, but on the fourth 
rush DeLine carried the ball over, 
and Squire kicked the goal. Mon- 
son made a game struggle to over- 
come their opponent's lead in the last 
quarter, but they were not quite cap- 
able of it, and went down to defeat 
for the second year in succession to 
an Aggie freshman team. 
The summary : 

\|, A. < . ISM MllKMI.V At \IIK\I\ 

CMletOO, Is re, (iilliuun 

tkirwaiz, U ri, Sullivan, Parker 

Readki. In rir, Parker, Uogff, Ralston 
Bacon, Bunker, <• e, CftTlson 

McLeod, rg lu.o'Hrien 

Tabnadgp, n l«, Prover 

Dewim:, re 

It-, Burden, Dulllvan, StaKhwMl 
Vl«e**l, qb qb, Bailey, Squire 

Lest, Ibb rbb, Lockwood. DeMarsi* 

Gray, rub lbb, DriJne, Daley 

Cuntte, fb >'», Squire, DeMarne 

s.-uTa—M. A. f*. IS, Monson Academy 
7, Touchdowns— Lent, Mcl/eod, De- 
Line. Goal frmii tiiiiehiluwii— Squire. 
Keferee — Donellan, Umpire— Ilmm- 
liaii. Head lineman — Newton. Time — 
IS and 10 minute periods!, 

CALL FOR CANDIDATES 
Oliver L.Flint, manager of varsity 
track has issued a call to freshmen 
for candidates for the position of 
assistant manager of track athletics. 
Names should be handed to Flint '17, 
or Graves and Waite *!'.). 



PUBLIC SPEAKING TAKES 

ON A NEW LEASE OF LIFE 

To Come Under Supervision of N. A. A. 

New Coaches Appointed. To 

Have Business Manager 

Public Bpeaking at M. A. C. is be- 
ginning a new era, in the opinion of 
those especially interested. The 
Non-Athletic Association has been 
placed in supervision of the activity 
outside of class work. "We expect 
good business and advertising man- 
agement will be substituted for 
looser methods," say some of the 
students interested in debate and 
ceclamation. 

The Public Speaking Council is 
still to be in control of debating, but 
there is also to be a business man- 
ager. He will arrange the dates and 
look after the advertising. The 
council will merely choose the ques- 
tions to be debated. 

Sidney S. Smith of Itoslindale has 
been chosen business manager. He 
will continue for two years, after 
which the selection will be made 
yearly. 

A new system of coaching is also 
to be instituted. With the resigna- 
tion of Prof. Henry E. Smith, who 
successfully coached the teams for 
the past few years, the council has 
requested Dean Lewis and Mr. Rand 
to serve as coaches. Both these men 
have had considerable experience in 
debating and public speaking. 

Manager Smith is now working on 
his schedule. He has arranged for a 
debate with the University of Ver- 
mont at Burlington and one with 
Clark University at Worcester, and 
is now negotiating with Maine and 
Union. But one of these debates 
will be signed up. The freshmen 
will probably debate Williston Sem- 
inary and the Williams freshmen. 

Thomas L. Har rocks '16 is the 
only loss of last year's teams and 
with Lincoln D. Kelsey of Hartford, 
Howard L. Hussell of Worcester, 
Henry J. Burt of Someivilie, Hamil- 
ton K. Foster of New Kochelle, 
N. Y., Robert Westman of Roslin- 
dalc, and David M. Lipshires of 
Somerville, in addition the numbers 
of last year's freshmen team avail- 
able it seems that two excellent col- 
lege teams can be picked. 

Added incentive to make the teams 
has been given by offering a medal of 
the Non-Athletic Association to those 
who participate in two regular inter- 
collegiate debates. 



Cox Sons & Vining 

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floods 

i M for all Degrees 

ES FOR JUDICIARY, CLEF Y AND CKl 




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EUROPEAN PLAN 



The Heat PUce to Dine 

GOOD FOOD l-Kol'KKI.l PRXPARBD 

All Kindt of Sea Food 

60-cant Luncheon from 11-90 to 1 p.m. 

Special Dithe* at All Heur. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that if the boys want 

to have their shoes tapped 

with the best quality of 

leather, drop in 

and see 

J. GIKSBURO 

nyi Amity Street 



The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTKI. 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



NEW MEETING SUCCEEDS 

An informal talk of the kind which 
now replaces the old style meeting of 
the Y. M. 0. A. was held around the 
fire-place at the Social Union last 
Thursday. About 25 men attended 
the gathering which followed the style 
of the Ford Hall meetings. It is 
planned to hare men of all the diff- 
erent nationalities represented in the 
college give their view on the differ- 
ent subjects under discussion. 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 




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, Dovnut 
, lasotuTttJJ 



AGRICULTURAL MAJORS LEAD 

Forty Percent of Upper Classmen 
Choose Practical Courses. 
Over forty percent of tbe students 
in the two upper classes chose for 
their majors practical agricultural 
courses such as animal husbandry, 
dairying, poultry and pomology, ac- 
cording to figures just made public 
bv the registrar. Horticultural voca- 
tions command tbe attention of 82 
men, while 00 others are specializing 
in chemistry, microbiology, ento- 
mology, and otber sciences. Dr. 
Cance's enlarged course in agricul- 
tural economics lias proved popular 
with the juuiors, eighteen of whom 
:ue majoring in this subject. The 
complete figures follow : 



Hajob, ••' 


MHH8. BttNiOHBi 


I'M \l I 


Agriculture 


is 


a 


ta 


Aumuninv 


8 


4 


• 


Animal lluttbanilo 


tl 


10 


in 


(■drying 


1 


1 


^ 


I'oultry 


5 


• 1 


n 


1 l.pilriilture 


11 


11 


IK 


Purest!! 


I 


1 


3 


Undecape Osrctenlns 


I 


,1 


11 


I'.iiiKilniiy 


18 


H 


■2; 


Dotaii) 


y 


II 


•1 


i tii-inlstry 


i« 


II 


U 


liitoiixilogy 


7 


HI 


IT 


Microbiology 


g 


IS 


M 


Karal JMrsattsBi 


I 


I 


h 


Aicrlt-nral Keonouiica 


IK 


i 


1'.' 


Igrteiiltrara! KdueaMoej 1 


:t 


in 


liural Social Silence 


H 





a 




- 





— ^™ 




1W 


104 


M 



TO RUN SPRINGFIELD 

Cross Country Teams to Finish Race 
Between Halves of Fresh- 
man Game. 

On Thursday, Nov. 2, the cross 
country team will run Springfield 
college over the same course as Sat- 
urday's race, and on Nov. 11 will 
compete against Williams at Wil- 
liamstown. One week later the 
team will enter the intercollegiate 
meet at Boston for which the Aggie 
hill and dale runners are working hard 
under the direction of Captain Lyons 
and Carpenter '19, who has been 
declared ineligible. Team work will 
be the watchword of the M. A. C. 
men, as it was shown in Saturday's 
contest with Worcester tech. 

The run with Springfield will start 
at the Drill Hall at 4-30 and will fin- 
ish on Alumni Field between the 
halves of the Freshman-Holyoke High 
School game. The team will be com- 
posed of the following men : Captain 
Lyons »18, Bell '17, Bainbridge 'IK, 
Gordon '18, Schwartz '18, Chapin 
'19, and Sweeney M9. 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college men, from $1.50 to $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 «P 

THE ENGLISH AQUASOUTUM COATS 

Ready-to-wear Clothes for young men from Atterbury System Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Made-to-your-measure Clothes, from $25.00 "P^ 

Mr. Campion personally superintends to fitting in 
this department and is an expert in the business. 

Ohio* tm% Bkst Custom Tailoring Departments in mikStaik 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS GLOVES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



FRESHMEN MEET HOLYOKE 

The last game of the freshman 
football team will be played on 
Alumni field Thursday at four o'clock 
when they will line up against the 
strong Holyoke high school eleven 
liv playing this game .on a week 
day, the players are now given an 
opportunity to make the Tufts trip 
which has been denied past freshman 
teams because of games scheduled 
upon the day of the Tufts game, 
llolvoke promises to give the young- 
sters a snappy and close game. It 
is expected that the finish of the 
cross country run with Springfield 
Y. M. C. A. will take place between 
the halves. 



HEAR ELECTION RESULTS 



Social Union Committee to Have 
Special Wire. 

Whether the tide turns for Wilson 

or for Hughes, Aggie students will 

have ample opportunity to hear the 

latest returns in Stockbridge Hall on 

election night, Nov. 7. Through the 

courtesy of the Western Union a 

special wire will give the college direct 

connection for the transmission of 

election bulletins which will be thrown 

on the screen as they come in. Two 

fin reel feature films will also be 

shown under the auspices of the social 

union committee, as well as a one reel 

'omedy, at the regular price of ten 

cents. 



NEW FOOTBALL SONG 

"Touchdown," music by Frauk A. 
Anderson, M. A. C. 1916, and words 
by Almon W. Spaulding '17 of Dor- 
chester will make its initial appear- 
ance on campus tomorrow, when it 
it will he introduced to the student 
body at assembly by the glee club. 

It is hoped that this football song, 
which is warlike and stirring in music 
and words, will become the battle 
song of old Aggie. That the song is 
published in real usable form is due 
to efforts of Anderson, Spaulding and 
Lipshires, who formed a syndicate 
for the publication and sale of this 
football song. The successful career 
of this first attempt to replenish the 
songs of M. A. C. will no doubt act 
as a stimulus for the further publish- 
ing of other Aggie compositions. 

The publishers of the song have 
had it copyrighted in the name of 
the Non Athletic Board ami a* MOO 
as the expenses of the song are paid 
the copyright and sale privileges will 
be turned over to the board. 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



JUNIOR SMOKER 

The first 1918 smoker will be held 
Wednesday, Nov. 8, at 7 r. m\ in the 
s »ial Union. The program will in- 
<ludi speeches, comedy stunts, and a 
feed at 10 p. M, 



PROM COMMITTEE ORGANIZES 

Plans for the annual Junior Troin 
are already under way. Though no 
definite date has been set a tentative 
one has already been considered. 
The committee in charge has organ- 
ized as follows : chairman, Marshall 
Lanphear; treasurer, Foster Baker; 
iecretary, John Chapman ; programs. 
John Maginnis; de. orations, Wells 
Thompson ; supper. Sidney Smith ; 
music, Harlan Worthley. 

TO REMOVE FOUNTAIN 
Numerous accident* in front of the 
Physics Building have made it ex- 
pedient to remove the nearby foun- 
tain which obatrncta the view when 
one is coming down the hill. The 
surrounding sod has been Uken out 
I »nd work has begun on the removal 
of the fountain itself. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

[TOR forty yeiw we h« ve rendered lakhful terne*. For forty 

I* yean we h«*e tried to m«ke «eh yew'i lerriee men newly 

kle*l. Thu untiring effof I hu built for ut not only The Wwtfi 

Urge* Mail Oder Seed BuineM, but •!» • WwU Wide 

reputation for EJfeaeney Mid unduputed lendefihip. The 

Fortieth AnnWenwy Edition of B»rpMi'i Annual, the 

"Leading American S««d Catalog" it brighter aad 

better than trwf. It a muM free. A pottcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE k CO. , Seed Growers, 

Building. PWkd«lpbi. 



F*««e'« Shoe Store 

Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
Uxpert RepnlrliiB-Beat lentlieruwed 



•le: 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




L 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Publlnhed every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massac hu- 
■etts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. BMITH It, Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O. LAM'HEAR'tB. M'iftne Kdltor 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17, AMlitant Editor 
WILLIAM 8AVILLE. JR. '17. Alninnl Editor 



AB8«m-IATK KlMTOHS. 

.lollN T. HIZKIt '17 

JOBKl'll K. WHITNEY It 
FRANK J. H1NKS 'Ik 

NATHAN W. <;|LLETTK *18 

EDWARD N. MITCHELL '18 
ELIOT M. BCFFOM '19 

MYKTON K. EVANS '19 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MERRILL P. WARNER '17. HimlneM Manager 
JAMES C. l'OWELL '18. 

Assistant Business Mananer 
BIRHER R. KOSKUI 1ST 18, 

Advertising Manager 

Subscription $2.iK) per year. Single 
copies, H rents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the Imsiness 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered m second-class matter at the Amherat 
Po«t Office. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Oct. 31. No. 5 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

INotlcea for thia column ahould be dropped tn 
at the Coi.i.koian office or handed to Nathan 
VV. (illlctte 'is on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each iaaue.l 

Wkhnkshay, Nov. 1 
2-1*1 I-. m. Student Korum. 
Till liSDAY Nov. 2 

m.— Football. Freshman vs. 
Holyoke Higli at Alumni 
Field. 

M. — Cioss-eounlry. M. A. <'. 
vs. Springlield Y. M. <'• A. 
college on tlie campus. 
M. — Mass Meeting, old chapel. 

Satikdav, Nov. 4 
M. — Tufts special leaves. 
m.- Tufts special arrives at 

Davis Square. 
II.- Varsity football, M. A. C. 
vs. Tufts at Tufts Oval, Med- 
io rd. 
H-ltO p. m. -"Aggie N'ight" at Colonial 
i heatre. 
s i ■ M i a v . SoV. 5 
7-(H> !•. m. — Special train leaves North 

Station. 
KMKI p. M.— Special arrives in Amherst. 
TtTMDAl , Nov. 7 
MO i'. M. -Movies at Stuckbridge Hall. 
Flection returns. 



4-(K) I- 
4-:«l P 

ti-:u> p 

o-i:. \ 

18-00 

2-80 p 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity 
holdB its national convention in Wor- 
cester, Nov. 2, 3 and 4. 

Last Friday, Oct. 27, seniors in 
pomology 75 and 78 took a trip to the 
Williamsburg Cooperative Associa- 
tion. 

Dean Lewis is considering a new 
literary society which will be formed 
soon by those interested iu English 
literature in the college. 

No double cuts will be given those 
men who remain home Tuesday to 
vote, providing they present at state- 
ment that they stayed home to cast a 
ballot. 

The circulation of the Springfield 
Republican is temporarily increased 
because the freshmen have to read it 
in their English course. The analy- 
sis of the editorials and an interest 
in current events are the objects 
sought by this form of study. 



" BIDE-A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our Specialty— And other good things total 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4I5-W 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKGUI.AR SUNDAY SKKVICK AT 7 P. M. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



Ii there basso far been any lack of 
enthusiasm for the Tufts trip we do 
not construe the apparent apathy M 
meaning that only a few will go, but 
rather that the student body has come 
to look upon this annual excursion as 
a matter of course. Kverv man who 
has ever attended a Tufts game 
before will rake together his last 
pennies in order to be there this 
year. We therefore direct our appeal 
to the freshmen, who have as yet 
had no means of knowing what a col- 
lege football trip is like, and who will 
be responsible for the success of future 
similar excursions. This is Aggie's 
one big time in the vicinity of Boston, 
the one great opportunity to show 
people in the eastern half of the state 
what there is up here From the 
standpoint of the college it is the 
best kind of advertising, and from 
the standpoint of the student it should 
mean even more. Here, as at no 
other time, one has the opportunity 
to express his college loyalty away 
from the campus, to get a taste of 
that form of college life which is 
so different from the daily routine 
and yet to unmistakably surrounded 
by an Aggie atmosphere. Let this 
trip be so well supported as to leave 
no doubt in the minds of the Tufts 
followers that M A. C. is still on 
the map and has a student body 
loyal enough to back the team to the 
limit, win or Iobc. 



TO INVADE TUFTS SATURDAY 

Three hundred loyal Aggie rooters 
will start their invasion of Tufts Col- 
lege Saturday morning, when the an- 
nual special train leaves the B. & M. 
station for Hoston at 9 . 1 5 . The traiu 
will stop at Davis Square, Winter 
Hill and Boston, and coining back 
will leave the North station at 7-00 
p. m. Sunday night, and will stop at 
Walthain North, Hudson, Oakdale 
and Jefferson. The following rules 
have been drawn up for the Tufts' 
trip : 

First: That this game be played 
on alternate years in Amherst, thus 
reducing the trips to one every two 
years. 

Second : During the week preced- 
ing the game, only one mass meeting 
be permitted, that there be no sale of 
train or game tickets at mass meet- 
ing, but that all tickets be sold under 
direction of the physical director. 

Third : That double cuts be en- 
forced for the three days preceding 
ami following the trip, but it is un- 
derstood this applies only to men 
leaving early or returning late ; if for 
any reason a man cuts, he must see 
the Dean, explain his case, and he 
will not receive the double cuts ; also 
that the work of the Saturday fore- 
noon of the game be transferred or 
excused as the President may deem 
advisable. 

Fourth: That the special train 
must arrive in Amherst not later 
than 10-30 o'clock Sunday evening 
after the game. 



GOOD THINGS MAY BE MESS 
SAYS ASSEMBLY SPEAKER 

Mr. George W. Coleman, director 
of the Ford Hall Foundation, Boston, 
was the speaker at assembly Wednes- 
day, Oct. 2a. He said in part: 

"Good things may be in such a com- 
bination that they are a perfect mess. 
We are all old enough to be able to 
choose automatically between good 
and bad. We ought to be able to 
distinguish between those good 
things that are opposed to each other 
in order to have life successful. 
Play and work are both good but we 
must regulate them so that they will 
oppose each other. Some things 
must be adjusted very finely as, 
self development and self expression. 
"We should distinguish finely be- 
tween faith and caution. Faith is as 
much a part of business life as it is 
of the religions life. 

"In all our cities there are combina- 
tions of good things working against 
each other. Ford Hall in Itoston off- 
ers a kind of neutral meeting place. 
All the different people of the city 
have a chance to meet and hear the 
great men and women of the day dis- 
cuss the most important problems that 
we are facing. Thirty or forty per 
cent of the members are Jews. The 
audience, although made up of a 
number of different elements, is per- 
fectly orderly." 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



MURDERED! 

The prices of hundreds of articles 
has been terribly mutilated for the 

1-Cent Sale 



See the Circular. 



HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The REXALL Store 



"MICRO" CLASSES CHANGE 
The microbiology classes were 
conducted in the new building for 
the first time on Monday, Oct, 30. 
Although the department is not as 
yet quite settled in its new quarters, 
falioratory classes including courses 
61, 81, 88 will be conducted there 
from now on, while course oO will be 
given in Flint Lab, as usual, until 
further notice. 



GRADUATE STUDENT KILLED 

Krnest L. Davies, a graduate of 
Ontario College, Guelph, Canada, and 
a graduate student of microbiology 
at M, A C. during the years 1913- 
1914, waa killed at the front Oct. 21. 
Davies was enlisted in one of those 
Canadian regiments which have taken 
Buch an active part in the drive along 
the Somme. 



SOPHOMORES GETTING READY 

Sophomore preparedness is shown 
by the rounding into shape of the 
class football and rifle teams. Cap- 
tain Poole of football soon will have 
a strong team together and with a lit- 
tle practice should be able to make 
the annual game with the lowar class, 
a week from Saturday, very interest- 
ing. Manager Hall of the rifle team 
has a nucleus of last year's men 
around which be will try to develop 
a strong and unified team. The 
annual match with the freshmen 
will be shot daring the week before 
Thanksgiving. 



0i LAVAL 

Cream Separator 
Supremacy 

38 YEARS of LEADERSHIP 



OVER W F«*r» of experience «r»«l th"" 
gandanf tmti the world over have dftn 
onstrated the Oe {.aval to be the onl» IfcSP 
ouutily clean skimming cream separator. 
Superior construction tbroucboiit ni»k»-« 
possible (truster capacity, cleaner sklum.tim 
and a heavier rrctm than ran he lit HIM 
with any other iiuk hine. 

Tbe driving mechanism of the De Ia»»' 1» 
perfectly "lied and the howl rani at *!"* 
•peed, ail of which it conducive tn the has 
life of the machine. A Da iJival *HI '•"' 
Troro 15 to 20 Feani, while the life of 
cream separator* averages from s to 1 1 ' '""' ' ' 
Sot a rear goes by but what some HafTO** 
ment u made In De I,ava! maehlnej. and M 
•tone ta left nntnrned by tbe De Lava 
pany to insure to »-%err D» Laval u*m *• 
KTeateit possible tfervtea from nil dhm bH"" 

More De Lavali are sold ev err ,'W> r lh * n 
ail other makes combined, and Dt I* f *« 
nsciH are satisfied users— not only when *•* 
machine in new but during the many r**» 
of Its life, ^^^ 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

W %. MAPtso^ 9t 
CHICAOO 



lffi Broadway 
NEW YORK 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Editor of the Collegian : 

The rushing season is over. Every- 
one has breathed a sigh of relief and 
either offered a prayer that things 
may be changed before another year, 
or been content to call the present 
system a necessary evil and let it go 
at that. 

There are few who are satisfied 
with the present conditions. That 
both freshmen and upperclassmen 
neglect their studies during a period 
when it most important that work 
should be kept up ; that there is 
alwavs a certain amount of hard feel- 
ing caused between certain fraterni- 
ties ; that freshmen are not intro- 
duced to college life but to a false 
form of fraternity life that is from 
Btart to finish a raeie matter of com- 
petition ; these are generally recog- 
nized facts. 

To say that these conditions are a 
necessary evil is merely an admission 
that we are afraid to face the music. 
To say "Let the Fraternity Confer- 
ence handle the matter," is a logical 
enough conclusion, but to have some 
concern in how they handle the mat- 
ter is the duty of the fraternities at 
the present time. 

For years the rushing season has 
been regulated and changed from one 
plan to another, yet in 1916 we find 
things just as unsatisfactory as ever. 
Why not a broadminded compre 
hensive plan of action this year? 
We had formed last year an alumni 
interfraternity organization that has 
for its purpose the betterment of fra- 
ternity conditions at M. A. C. Just 
m a senior can look at college prob- 
lems in a more broadminded way than 
a sophomore, bo, it stands to reason, 
could some of the live young alumni 
in the graduate organization proba- 
bly hand the seniors a few ideas. 

So why not a joint committee from 
these two groups to talk the matter 
over, just from the standpoint of 
Aggie men trying to do something for 
Aggie's betterment. Why not try it ? 
An Unhekoraoiatk. 



ON TO TUFTS 



All in Readiness for Contest With 
Med ford Rivals. Varsity in 
Good Condition 
M. A. C. meets Tufts college in 
Medford Saturday for the fifth game 
of the season. Tufts liana strong i 
team this yeai . Her seoies ihow 
that she beat Harvard 7-:'>. was held 
by Boston college 18-0, was beaten 
by Princeton M) and triumphed over 
Indiana 12-10. 

The Harvard score can be taken 
for no hasis for comparison because 
the game was played too early in the 
season. The fact that Hoston col- 
lege was held 13-0 and that a trip to 
Indiana enabled her to return home 
with a bare two points margin is en- 
couraging for Aggie. Last year 
Tufts* strong point was forward 
passes, M. A. C.,s weak point was 
in breaking up forwards, and the 
score ended in a tie. This yiar 
Tufts is again playing forwards and 
Aggie can be counted on to profit by 
previous year's experience and conn- 
through at the finish with the right 
score. Tufts can probably play all 
her regulars, so will Aggie. Last 
week's small score for Aggie against 
Worcester Tech will act as pbysieolo- 
gic appetizer. Kveiy year the Maroon 
and White has shown unexpected 
ability against Tufts and this year 
will be no exception. Watch Aggie. 
Tbe probable lineup : 

TUFTS 
Jochim, le 
Brown, It 
Abbott, lg 
Pryor, c 
Algar, rg 
Beacham, rt 
Sanborn, re 

Bratt, qb qb, Whittle or F. O ray son 
Mitchell, lhb rhb, Boles 

Wesiott, rhb lhb. Pond 

Doane, fb fb, Weeks 



M. A. C. 

re, Day 

rt, Edwards 

rjf, Dunn 

c, Roberts 

lg. Spaulding 

It, Blanchard 

le, Grayson 



FORM ECONOMICS CLUB 

An Agricultural Economics Club 
was organized Wednesday evening at 
( lark hall by the students majoring 
in economics. Dr. Cance and Mr. 
Rutledge spoke on the possibilities of 
the new organization, and Westman 
17 talked on "The Factors in the 
Cost of Production of Farm Products." 
An open discussion followed. An 
executive committee waa appointed 
to draw np a constitution. The 
officers of the new club are: Presi- 
dent, S. S. Smith '18 ; vice-president, 
tnd chairman of program, L. P- 
Kmmerick '18; secretary and treas- 
urer, Theodore Heumann *18 ; corre- 
tponding secretary, D.^M. Lipshires 
"18. The club, which numlmrs nine- 
t«u members at present, will hold 
regular meetings in Clark Hall, Wed- 
nesday evenings at 7 o'clock. 



RIFLE PRACTICE STARTED 

Fort v- two freshmen have been try- 
ing their shooting ability in the drill 
hall rille rangr the past week and 
have Bade remarkably good scores. 
A sophomore- freshman rifle match 
scheduled for the near future is ex- 
pected to enliven the interest in tin* 
branch of sport for which M. A. C. 
has earned a reputation in former 
years. < >nly two letter men are left 
from last year's team, making it 
necessary for Sergeant Smart to build 
up practically an entirely new team. 
Among the men who scored high last 
year and are expected to show up 
well this season areTuthill and Mack 
'17, Raymond and Phillips *1* ami 
Paisons '1!'- 

HUGHES WINS STRAW VOTE 

Hughes with SW against Wilson's 
ii'i summarizes the straw vote at last 
Wednesdav'sassembly. Henson, the 
socialist candidate received the sup- 
port of seven men while Hanley, the 
prohibitionist polled four votes. 

That *8 M. A. C. men will vote at 
the coming election was signified on 
the straw ballot. Of the W, M 
declared for Hughes and H for 
Wilton. 



CANNING LABORATORY AT 

COLLEGE STORAGE PLANT 

Grape juice, grape jelly, and grape 
jam are flowing like water at the new 
canning laboratory of the pomology 
department, recently equipped with 
manv of the latest appliances of the 
canning industry. Students major- 
ing in pomology have been experi- 
menting in the making of various pro- 
ducts aud by-products from grapes 
ami plums, especially good results 
being obtained which would make any 
good housewife envious. The new 
rooms of the canning department are 
situated in the southwest comer of 
the storage plant, thereby making 
available the various fruits direct 
from cold storage with which the 
classes work. 

The laboratory consists of two 
rooms, one containing a sink and a 
large work-table for general use, the 
other containing a number of oil stovrs. 

lockets for utensils, and benches for 
individual use. In the general work- 
room are also various appliances for 
group use. A sterilizing tank 
for sterilizing jars and bottles is 
situated in onecornri, gas being used 
to boil the water in which the bottles 
are placed On the work-table is a 
cold-press for the purpose of pressing 
the juice from the raw fruits. Near 
by is an apparatus for cooking fruits 
that are already hermetically sealed 
in jars aud caiiB under high pressure. 
There is also a patent device for peel- 
ing apples, done by simply turning a 
crunk, which peels tt» apples as clean 
as could possibly be done by hand 
and with much less waste. 

Some of the results obtained since 
this work began give plenty of food 
for thought. A bushel of cider apples 
with a value of 12 to \i cents will 
make from fid to 90 x-ounce tumblers 
of first class apple jelly, exclusive of 
labor and fuel the OOSt is about 5 
cents a glass. This is the same 
product which retails in winter for 



cents a glass. From these figures 
it would app ar that cider apples have 
a much higher value than they get 
credit for. 

MUSICAL CLUB SCHEDULE 

The musical clubs will make a trip 
to New York during the Faster recess, 
Thev will give two concerts in the 
western part of this state then they 
will go to New York, hold two con- 
certs in Connecticut and end the trip 
with two performances in Hoston 
Joint concerts with William* and 
Wesleyan are new features. The 
tentative program is as follows : 
March 23, Williamsat North Adams. 

«24, Pittsfleld. 

_'.■>, Sew York alumni. 

27, Paterson, N. J. 

•J8, Middletown, Wesleyan. 

•29, Hartford High School 

90, Boston Alumni 

91, Chestnut Hill Club. 



*13« — iJorn July 17 in Honolulu, 
T. H., a daughter, Harbara Eleanor, 
%o Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Borden. 



THK 



United States Hotel 

I'.curl). I.IiH'olii ami kltm-tun Sis . 

boston, n*ss. 



nub two blocks from Boath Terminal Sta- 
Clun. And easily M-iiiin.i ft. -in Niirtlt Station 
ii> Kii'vatfii Railway. and mnvenl*nl allk* 

tn tilt' Bicat f#tall ihO|M anil tiaaittPM ii'iil 1 1'. 
also to tin* thi'H!H"» anil plaeM of Intorpat 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

TuMi' and ••f I 11 " Miihiii ii.hhimI. 
iiiniKii-1 ami map iM-iii upon application. 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Proprietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

&gtata tin i:«\ TYfuwiUcr 

I-. M.CURRAN C.F. OVER 



STMTFIIMIE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 

gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWEK EXPENSES Enable us 

to offer an absolute lower price 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MAKsii ESTATE 

K"t» ■»•••• Hi. tao'j 

Sti.i'hkn Lank loLami inc. 

M*Nir*(jrumNii jwt.Mtn 
inn HHIWIIWAV, NKW YOKK 

or*im and troi.r.KuK 

I'IN'M A>*ll RINtiN yfc 

• Xtl.lt, mil,\ K.»« * VII MlfO<*XP< MNItAI.M 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEINS TAILORING PARLORS 

Now luealfl ovm pn%t ofhc*. I i> nnP flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I ,iij«f *\ Tlcfcvt S*»t«a 



I »1. v> M 



College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and .stationer 



• 



ill 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



TO PARK AUTOS 

Two parking places for automobiles 
are soon to be located, one near Wil- 
der Hall, the other near the Entomo- 
logical Building, although the exact 
location is yet uncertain. At pres- 
ent, the east road on the campus is 
almost blocked to traffic every day by 
the many automobiles parked there, 
and although Mr. Dickinson of the 



grounds department now has more 
work than he can comfortably do, the 
necessity for parking places has 
grown to such an extent, that work is 
shortly to be Btarted. 



'82. — Dr. J. A. Cutter is the author 
of an article on "Poliomyelitis" in 
the October number of The Medical 

FcOILOITllut, 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Ple*s»nt St. 
Oculnts' Prescriptions Filled. Broken L*n*e* 
Accurately Keplaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and .Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 



Williams block, 



Amherst. Mass. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valve* 
and Fittings tot Steam, Watei and Ga*. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. Molyoke, Mw. 

HECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



MASS MEETING THURSDAY 

Best of Speakers, Lots of "Pep." 
Every Member of Student 
Body Invited. 
The livest bunch of speakers pos- 
sible to get together has been secured 
for the first football mass meeting 
of the year coming Thursday at 6-30 
in the old chapel. For interest, in- 
formation, and real pep this meeting 
will take the cake. Were you in 
evidence at any mass meeting last 
year? Then we know you'll be ou 
the spot Thursday : follow the crowd ! 
Remember— the only mass meeting 
before the TuftB game. 



** MAMI 



» *■» 



Office Hours 9 t<> VI a. tn.. 1 ;«i t" •"• p. (B. 



The Highland Hotel 

Comer of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three ' 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the Kuropean Plan. It is just I step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and vet »n the center of the business district. 

Its roo n* »re well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) S1.5II and up, 

1 1« excellent cuisine and wel! ventilated dining 
room nakes a meal a pleasant memory— every 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anti-mate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



JOHNSON BOOK CO. 



SPECTATORS NOT ALLOWED 

At the suggestion of the senicr 
sccietv, Adelphia, the informal com 
mittee has decided to lock the door 
of the drill hall spectators' balcony at 
all future informals. The present 
of lookers-on who crowded the gallery 
aud stairways has in time past been u 
serious problem in the conducting <>f 
these affairs for the fullest enjoyment 
of the guests from neighboring col- 
leges. The committee therefore 
takes this means as the simplest way 
to solve the difficulty. 



Agricultural Books 

and Filing Cases 



IIU'IiInihI Hotel, 



BprlaffftvM, Mm*: 



BABBITT & W00BW0BTH 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 



BATCHELDER & SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 



SOPHOMORES WIN SINGLES 

The sophomores have made a clean 
sweep so far in their tournament 
with the freshmen. All the single 
matches have been played, every 
one being a win. The doubles will 
come off this week. 

Following are the results of hist 
week's singles : 

skinner '10 \s. Hortie »,M) "-7. 
Huffum *%9 vs. Silverman *», ri-1,1 -«.•.-;«. 
MaiiM-ll '19 vs. liieiiar.ls'UO, 11!»,4-<I.H-H. 
spaiil.liim ']'.♦ vs. Snow '2t>, 6-4, <l-4. 

Uowe '19 n-. I *i x.«ti -J(». 'Mi, 6-0. 

\V. K. Smith lit vs. Newell tO, <M), tt-tl. 

CONCERT IN FORD HALL 

The musical clubs will give a con- 
cert at the Ford Hall Foundation, 
Boston on Dec. 81. This coucert 
was arranged through (ieorge \V. 
Coleman, the director of the Foun- 
dation, who spoke at Assembly 
Wednesday. Plans are under way 
for a joint concert with the Tuft*' 
musical clubs to be held in North- 
umpton. 

RECENT BULLETINS 



W IIOI.KHAI.K <»M \ 



Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages, 
Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, Eggs. Olive Oils 



Rlackstone, North and North Centre Sim H 



BOSTON, 



MASS. 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY, Pa«». 




A S 



MEN'S 




Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local Agent for 

B, V. PRICE CO., LAMM CO., BROWNINO, KINO & CO., 

Custom Tailors 

OUK DISCOUNT TICKET SAVES YOU 5% 



Carptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No, t, Cook PUce, Amherst, Mass 



••Some Factors in Meal Planning" 
is the title of an interesting pamphlet 
recently gotten out by the extension 
service. The author. Miss Marie 
Savtea of the home economics depart- 
ment, emphasizes those factors which 
should be considered in planning 
meals so as to include the correct pro- 
portionBOf food -stuffs for the require- 
ments of the family. Tables are 
given showing the value of different 
foods and the needs of the body ac- 
coidiug to the kind of work the per- 
son is doing. Sample menus are also 
included to aid the farm woman in 
preparing varied meals. 

Another bulletin deals with farm 
management demonstration work in 
Massachusetts. Well illustrated, it 
sets forth in detail the work of the 
extension service in conducting farm 
management demonstrations. The 
recommendations at the end of the 
bulletin are particularly interesting. 
Mr. Hronson there advocates busi- 
ness on a larger scale to reduce pro- 
portionate operating costs. Where 
wholesale milk is produced, cash 
crops, such af poultry, should be in- 
troduced to provide a better distribu- 
tion of lal>or. Bett e r producing 
stock and better crop yields pay well 
on the successful farm, which has a 
well-balanced business. 



1914 NOTES 

It. K. Nute corrects the "daughter" 
part of his'14 note and says the name 
is Raymond Kdson Nute Jr. 

Harry Brown wishes to correct his 
M4 note also and say that he is abso- 
lutely not engaged as was reported 
recently. He is still with the Smith- 
port Kxtract Co. Inc , manufacturing 
tunning extract's, but has recently 
been transferred from plant No. t 
in .Jefferson, N. C. to the main plant 
at Damascus, Va. In a recent letter 
he says "I expect to get a vacation 
soon and am going to try to get up 
into the United States for a while." 
Det Jones has been eradicating 
earwigs in Newport, R. I., this sum- 
mer. 

K. S. Clark is now doing expert 
cow-testing for the Worcester County 
Farm Bureau. 

Larry Hogg is still at Tempe, \ri- 
zona, doing research work. 

Arthur Brooks is back from his 
recent job in California and is now in 
Elizabeth, N. J-, with the Grasseli 
Chemical Co. 

Art Weizel writes form San Pedro 
I)e Macorio, Dominican Republic: 
'•Am running fertilizer experiments 
here, having 111 acres to look after. 
This year the company turned out 
•213,025 bags of sugar or 3 1-2 mil- 
lion dollars worth. In all we have 
36,000 acres of land, cut 2Xn,(KK) 
tons of cane have 25 miles of railroad 
system, eight locomotives, and tort* 
tug-boats." 

Henry Clay is a market investiga- 
tor and crop report publisher f»r 
Jersey melon growers. 

Jack Wing ib running a dairy and 
hog farm in Piedmont, N. H. Ad- 
dress Box 27, Pike, New Hampshire. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The 18th annual reunion ami ban- 
quet of the M. A. C. club of New 
York will be held at the Hotel Man- 
hattan, Saturday evening, Nov.11.* 1 
7 o'clock. President Butter-field vrill 
deliver the principal address of thi 
evening and a snappy program de- 
voted to reminiscences of the earlier. 
later, and more recent undergraduate 
life will be handled by "Bob" ( o ■■h- 
rsn *8i. 

-on.— Donald J. Caffery is one of 
the joint authors of the U. 8. dip*"" 
mentof agriculture Bulletin 448, M 
the New Mexico Range Caterpillar. 



The purpose of this bulletin is to 
place before the stockmen and farm- 
ers of the Southwest the results of 
iuvestigations carried on during the 
past three years concerning the con- 
trol of this pest. 

'12. — Stephen F. Hamlin is the 
author of a very attractive book re- 
cently puolised by Doubleday, Page 
&, Co. and entitled "Book of Garden 

1'lans." 

'15. — "Don" Williams is confined 
at home, Catasauqua, Penn., on 
account of an accident. He writes : 
•The local football team of iron- 
heavers was one man short. I took 
the place. We journeyed to Palmer- 
ton and engaged 11 husky zinc- 
rollers. The day was warm. We 
played in a gravel pit, the crowd, to 
say the least, was partisan, and the 
referee just loved to see the boys 
slug. Being more fortunate than the 
rest of our team, I got into only three 
lights. It was a glorious game. I 
received a kick-off and started run- 
ning. Then I hit something or some- 



thing hit me. They told me I was 
"out" 10 minutes. I haven't walked 
much since. The ••doc" tells me 
it's a wrenched knee, with complica- 
tions, and cheerfully asserts 1 shall 
be able to get around all right in two 
weeks. Otherwise I'm feeling fine." 

'16. — Albert E. Lindquist is with 
Better Farmhuj, 140 Ohio St., Chi- 
cago, doing editorial work and adver- 
tising soliciting. He has been trav- 
eling through the middle west, and 
writes enthusiastically of his work. 
He is in charge of the department of 
market newB. October Better Farm- 
ing also contains one of his special 
articles. 



Gallup at Holyoke 

293-297 High St. 
SELLS 

Hart Schaffer & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and see our 
big store. 



The Brisk Smoke-"Bull" Durham 



WKen you see an alert-looking young man in a 
lively argument roll a "Bull" Durham cigarette — it's 
the natural thing. He likes to punctuate a crisp 
sentence with a puff of "Bull** Durham. His mind 
responds to the freshness that's in the taste of it, and 
iiis senses are quickened by its unique aroma. A 
cigarette of "Bull** Durham just fits in with keen 
thinking and forceful action. 

GENUINE 

Bull Durham 

SMOKING TOBACCO 

Made of "bright"* Virginia-North 
Carolina leaf, "Bull" Durham is 
• «;h, fragrant, mellow-sweet — the 
.miriest, most enjoyable of smokes. 

**Rnll your own" with "Bull" 
Durham and join the army of 
■mnkers who have found that so 
good a cigarette cannot be ob- 
tained in any other way. 



A*k far FREE pack 



with mmchSe t a ek 



~r* 



ivAfi 



DURHAM 



FREE 



An lltiiatrnted Book- 
\rt, showing corrert 
tray to "Roll Your 
Own" Cigarette*, and • puck**" °f 
emanate paper*, will bnth b« mailed. 
It*, to an? addraaa in U S. on request. 
Addreii " Bull " Durh.m, Durham, N . C 



Smoking Tob.irrn. 






TIB AMERICAS TOBACCO CO. 





JUST 

A 



TIP! 



This year it's Sheepskin-lined Coats that have a dear field. 
lie sure you have yours before the "big" game; vou will look 
"ri^ht" in one of these big roomy coats ami you won't know what 
it is to be cold. 

We have the largest line of these coats in the state and all we 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that we 
are able to oiler you. Ask the man who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over 65 Years 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

! THE COE-MORTIMER GO. 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



* 



I 
1 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1916. 



MAGAZINE GIVES BOOST 

TO FLORICULTURE DEPT. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Getting Beady for Flower Show. 
More Attention to Commercial 

Classes, 
ffortiaultvre in commenting on the 
coining M. A. C. Hotter show gives 
the lloiieultural department credit for 
advanced ideas along tight lines and 
a turning away from the stereotyped 
Mower shows of the past. 

The department believes that this 
credit is deserved and as evideuce of 
it on Nov. 11, 12 and 18 in French 
hall will stage an exhibit, open to 
the public, which will be us far away 
from the ordinary ns possible. 

In addition to the features noted 
in last week's CoUagian, a series of 
blooms showing the evolution of the 
chysantheinum from its earliest form 
to the present commercial specimens 
will uo doubt attract attention. 

Realizing that the commercial 
classes need more space, a room has 
been set aside for this work which 
will assume proper setting. It is ex- 
pected that in these classes many of 
the local florists will compete. 

One thing which cannot be over- 
emphasized is that all of the flowers 
used in the decorations are grown in 
the college greenhouses. On Mon- 
day night, the last night of the show, 
a joint meeting of the Northampton 
and llolyoke and the M. A. C. Flor- 
ists & Gardener's clubs is planned, 
with the local club as host. 



Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestt y 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



FLORICULTURE NOTES 



The department of ttoricultuie is 
showing many of its products at the 
Northampton and llolyoke Florists' 
tad Gardeners* club flower show in 
Northampton this week. Chrysan- 
themums are the chief features and 
the college has specimens entered in 
nearly all classes. 

Seniors in floriculture are compet- 
ing iu basket arrangements in a 
special M. A. C student class. 

The juniors have practically fin- 
ished reglnzing the upper plant house 
and have stmted inside propagation 
work. 

Seniors in floriculture assisted in 
planting the violet house with its 
winter crop of violets last week. 

The chrysanthemums are better 
than ever before and tome splendid 
specimens have already been cut for 
show purpose*. The rest are being 
held for the department show. 

Shipments of surplus stock of roses 
and carnations to Springfield have 
been going on for several weeks. 

WANT LONGER HOURS 

Recent action by the senate has 
brought up the matter of keeping the 
college library open for longer hours 
than at present. The proposal now 
tinder consideration by the authorities 
is to have the library open continu- 
ously on week days from 9 a. ». to 
9-80 v, m. and on Sundays from NW 
a* m. to 6 h. M, 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football AsBociatiou, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

If. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

H. E. Robbins, Manager 

L. T. Buckman, President 

R. L. Holden, Manager 

R. D. Hawley, Manager 

O. S. Flint, Manager 

II. R. Lawrence, Manager 

N. Moorhouse, Manager 

S. F. Tuthill, President 

A. F. Williams, Manager 

1). M. Lipshires, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

D. O. Merrill, President 
E. L. King, President 

L. T. Buckman, President 
M.J. McNamara. President 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



Leave ACKJIE COLLEOE for HOI- 
YOKE at 15 mlo. past the hour. 



CARS 



ThertareSeVeniijod lUsSWlSWai you should 
buy your 



COAL 



or 



C. R ELDER 



Leave AMHERST for ACWIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and J7 mln. oast the how. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Chttd 0*Jv tntm t A. M * 4 A. M 



The Connecticut Yalley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage -Hodero 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Sp«cUI Car. at U 



Rata* 



AMHERST . SUNDERLAND SI. It CO 



( Hi; TKKI'MY PABLO 8 

Cleaning Pressing K*M»'"*« 
y.n« •*«•« service. Best Work. Lo*»* **" 
All woik cwtfullr done. Work «1W for u| 
delivered. GsnU' gvercoati, suit*, panti u* 
coat*, Ladies' fina linan suits a iP**'*' 1 * 
Team* will call awry day al M .A c 

WM. MIANKXIN. »*«M> 
Rear Nash BITt, Amherst. Tel Ns J*w 



Amherst 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JN1FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished esamples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons. 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade Collegi Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, * 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



. f i-tc 

4 8c per d 01 ' 
- 30c per a«- 



Makers of ■ Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1 1 a*4- 1 4*6 Chentnut St , 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSES 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits &>'•'* 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, Ji 5°* s 

All bills parable at Co-op. «o» m* ** 
teft ttare will recetre prompt aneritwn. 

OBAWUt 11. Agent „ 

HioomaoTaaa*!'. »"*'■" 





SCOLIM 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 7, 1916. 



AGGIE LOSES TO TUFTS coach melican undergoes cross country runners 
IN WELL PLAYED CONTEST operation in Worcester win from Springfield 

Aggie Team has but little Trouble 

with Y. X. 0. A. College. To 

Bun Williams Saturday. 

In their second cross country run 
of the season M. A. C. defeated 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. college over 
the Aggie course by the Beore of *24- 
31 last Thursday- Captain Lyons 
'IN won the race in a sprint near the 
finish, defeating Snow of Springfield 
by 20 yards in the fast time of 2t» :'M). 
Peabody of Springfield closely fol- 
lowed Snow but all chances for the 
V. M. C. A. college to win were lost 
when Bainbridge, Chapin and Gordon 
came in together. Lvons bettered 
the record of the comae, held by 
Brown of Ml. T. by 40 seconds. 

The summary : 



Varsity Fights Gamely. Forwards 

Work Well for Brown and 

Blue. Final Score 28-0. 

Playinga stubborn defensive game, 
Massachusetts Aggie went down be- 
fore the bewildering shifts and for- 
ward pass attack of the Tufts eleven 
at Medford Saturday. The 28 points 
piled up by the Brown and Blue fail 
to indicate the kind of game the 
Aggie men put up against heavy 
odds, for although the ball was in 
M. A. C. territory almost continually, 
Tufts always struck a stone wall 
when near the goal line, which 
spoiled many of their chances to 
score. Long end runs by Pond and 
Boles gained Aggie's four first 
downs, while Tufts resorted mainly 
to a forward passing game, making 
a total of 13«> yards iu seven success- 
ful heaves out of 12 attempts. 
Doane's plunges through the line 
were nearly always blocked, and 
several times the TuftB runner was 
thrown for a loss. 

Tufts opened the first period by 
recovering the ball on the 25-yard 
line when an Aggie player fumbled 
the kickoff. A succession of rusheB 
brought the pigskin to within five 
yards of the goal, when the M. A. C. 
defense tightened and held Tufts for 
downs. Failing to gain, Aggie was 
for.-eil to punt, and again Tufts tried 
1 penetrate the Aggie defense with- 
in success. Neither team had any 
ulvantage for the rest of the period, 
t. ^"1 an exchange of kicks left the ball 
•* rjl the end of the quarter in Aggie's 
e possession on her own .*J0-yard Hue. 
Tuft. Blocks Kick 
the first few minutes of the 
icond quarter, Tufts managed to 
work the ball to within three yards of 
tt'< goal only to be held for downs by 
'!><■ Htubboru defense of the Aggie 
Ibe, Fond tried to kick out of dan- 



Stricken with Appendicitis on Way to 

Oame with Tufts. Rapid 

Recovery Expected. 

The active services of George D. 
Melican 'IS as head coach of varsity 
football were lost to the college for 
the rest of the season just previous to 
the Tufts game Saturday when he 
was forced to undergo an opetation 
for appendicitis at St. Vincent's 
Hospital, Worcester. He was stricken 
Friday afternoon while on the way to 
Boston with the team and his place as 
chief strategist was taken by Palmer 
in the Tufts contest. 

Professor Hicks saw Coach Melican 
at the hospital Sunday, and found 
that the operatiou had beeu so suc- 
cessful that Melican will uot be con- 
fined to the hospital over two weeks. 
It is possible,* therefore, that he will 
be able to direct the final contest with 
Springfield from the bench, but in the 
meantime the entire coaching will be 
managed by Assistant Coaches Perry 
aud Palmer. 



li 1 " 



ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 

TO HAVE FINE DISPLAY 

To Open Saturday Afternoon in French 
Hall, Featuring Chrysanthemums 

Practice work and experience for 
floriculture students is the foundation 
on which the M. A. C. Flower Show 
is based. Therefore people wishing 
to see what can be done in the way of 
up to the minute floriculture should 
drop in at French Hall next Saturday. 
Sundav or Monday. The advice is 
given to come Saturday aa that will 
give an opportunity to come back two 
more days and appreciate what was 
missed on the first visit. 

At -' v. M. Saturday, however, 
everything is to be in readiness and 
the public will be treated to a well 
arranged display of campus-grown 
blooms of all kinds with the chrysan- 
themum as the seasonable feature. 

The work of the seniors at North- 



1 Lyons, in U 

•I Soiiw, 1 7 

I Peabody, I H 

4 Babihrulee. in '.» 

."» Chapin. ■ 10 



(ionlon, in 
Thompson, 1 
Sweeney, M 

Anger. ■ 

l,ililiV. s 



Next Saturday the Maroon and 
White team rnns Williams at Wil- 
liamstown and a hard race is ex- 
pected. The Purple team defeated 
Union last Saturday by an over- 
whelming score and Brown of Wil- 
liams ran the four and a half mile* in 
the fast time of 21.24. Captain 
Lyons is giving his men easy work to 
prevent them from going stale as all 
were in perfect condition last week. 
The loss of Schwartz, who pulled a 
ligament iu his knee, will be greatly 
felt. The following men will run for 
M. A. C. ; Captain Lyons, Bain- 
bridge,Gordon, Chapin and Sweeney. 



get from behind his own goal posts, . 
but Ikacham broke through, blocking j »nipton last week proved what can be 
the punt and touching the ball down Uone in the way of basket srrsnge- 
f"« Tufts' first score. Wescott! men-a and t*o or more classei 1 of 
k.cked an easy goal. Boles received the** will be staged, 
the next kickoff and dodged through j have some 
'•* 'Token field to the dO-yard line, decorations 
Three attempts to gain through the ' something new. 
Hat failed, and Pond was forced to J Wedding decorations wdl els , be 
**. Straight football proved po*- 1 '"^ » «f » ^V^Z 
If aaaiosT the A*,* defense, P**^ * "Ittatand the bang ng and 

I jambing of eapreaa or parcels post. 



clever plans for table 
and intend to put on 



against the Aggie 

f Continued on page S.i 



HOTEL SOMERSET DANCE 

Under A imp ices of Greater Boston 
Club. Date Bet For Dec. 29. 

The second annual concert and 
dance of the Greater Boston M. A. 
C. Club will be held at the Hotel 
Somerset, Boston, Friday evening, 
Dec. 29, commencing at 8 o'clock. 
The concert of the combined musical 
clubs of the college will precede danc- 
ing which will last until 1 o'clock, 
with music furnished by the M. A. C 
orchestra. Tickets will be two dol- 
lars a couple. 

A similar affair was held last year 
at the Copley Plaza and proved very 
successful. The support of the stu- 
dents and alumni within reasonable 
distance of Boston is urgently re- 
quested. 



No. 6 



REVISED SCORING PLACES 
AGGIE JUDGERS SECOND 

Mistake in Awarding Points on Ayr- 
shires at Dairy Show. Kins- 
man '17 Gets a Third. 

A statement received last week by 
the M. A. ('. department of animal 
husbandry from tin- dairy division of 
the V. 8, department of agriculture 
shows (hat the Aggie Stock Judging 
team took second place in the judging 
of dairy animals at the National Dairy 
show instead of fifth as first reported. 
The error in the first report was 
accountable to a mistake in awarding 
points in the judging of Ayrshires. 
The revised scoring in Ayrshire judg- 
ing gave the M. A,C team s a oo ad 
place for this herd and raised the 
college standing to second place in 
the whole contest. The corrected 
score also gave A. O. Kinsman, Jr. 
'17 third place in the individual judg- 
ing of* Ayrshires. By thus winning 
second place iu judging all herds, the 
Aggie judgers were uwurdedtheJ. 
B. Ford Co. trophy, which was offered 
to the runners-up in the sweep-slakes. 
Nebraska won first ptaOS in the total 
scoring. 

NEW HOURS FOR LIBRARY 

Acting ou the suggestion of the 
Senate, the library department has 
made a few changes in the librajy 
hours. Under the new schedule the 
hours will be as follows : 

From 7-10 *. K. toU-.'lO i-.m. Tins 
day, Wednesday, Thursda\ . 

From 8-00 a. m. to t-IM r. m.Mou 
day and Friday. 

From !MM) a. u. t<> l-$U >•• m. on 
Sunday. 

This allows 7H available hours In 
the library. Only four <>r five col- 
leges have as long hourB as thin new 
schedule includes. 



M A. 0. DINNER OF 

WASHINGTON ALUMNI 

In connecrion with the Washington 
meeting of the AsiMK-intion of Ameri- 
can Agricultural Colleges and Kxperi- 
ment .Stations and related organise* 
Uone, the M. A. C. club Of Washing- 
ton, D, C. has arranged a dinner !<> 
be held at Hotel Ebhitl, I Ith and W 
streets N.W. Thursday evening, Nov. 
16 at 9-0(1 p. m. sharp. Alumni and 
former student* who can attend m« 
urged to be present, l/adies are 
invited as usual. Cost about $1. '1-- 
per piste. 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



CALL ISSUED FOR VARSITY 
BASKETBALL CANDIDATES 

to Practice Twice a Week. Positions 

Open for Assistant Managers, 

Freshmen to Have Schedule. 

the management of the basketball 
association announces that there will 
be practice for the candidates for the 
varsity five two nights a week until 
Thanksgiving- The first practice will 
be touight, Tuesday, Nov. 7, at 7-30 
v. m. in the drill hall for all candi- 
dates except the following : 

1 . Members of the football squad. 

2. Men who were shown to be 
ineligible on the Deau'B board of Nov. 

4. 

For the present no equipment will 
be furnished from the office, running 
suit and sneakers being sufficient. 

Candidates for assisiant manager 
of basketball should hand their names 
to Moorhouse '17, Clapp '1* « 
Odams '18 as soon as possible. 

A freshman schedule is being ar- 
ranged and candidates will be called 
out immediately after Thanksgiving. 



now upon a strictly commercial and 
self paying basis and there seems 
every indication that this uew feature 
will also be self supporting. The 
products are sold to the dining hall, 
to retail stores and to Btudents. 

New machiuery is being installed 
and eventually this department will 
have every modern device at its 
command. The students are here 
taught to manufacture ice cream 
just as if they were working for 
any large commercial plant. In this 
way they get both the theory and the 
practice. 



WILLIAMS TO BE OPPONENT 
OF VARSITY ON SATURDAY 

M. A. C. will meet Williams at 
Williamstowu next Saturday in the 
first football game between the two 
institutions for a number of ye.ii- 
The Purple team has a fairly g'»>.| 
record thus far this season, winning 
three games, tying one. and losing 
two. They have defeated such teams. 
as Inion. ft. H- I and Wesle.san 
while M. A. C. has won from Conn. 
Aggie and Worcester Tech. This 
does not give any chance for oom- 
parison but it is safe to say that Wil- 
liams will have to play better thin 
she has yet in order to break ev.n. 

The Maroon and White team was 
going at her best in the game with 
Tufto, playing far better than the 
week previous. The squad is in the 
beat of condition and all indications 
point to a victory over Williams. 

The probable line up : 

M. \- * 



LANDSCAPE CLASS MAKES 

A TOUR OF INSPECTION 

About ten members of the senior 
< hiss in landscape gaidening made 
the annual tiip of inspection of the 
most prominent Brookline estates and 
parks under the guidance of Mr. 
Harrison over the week-end. Fri- 
day afternoon the class visited 
••Weld," the estate of I.arz Ander- 
son, and "Faulkner Farm." both in 
BrOOktiM. Saturday morning "Holm 
Lea" was visited and the Muddy 
Brook Parkway. The trip was 
for the purpose of considering the 
plan and planting together with archi- 
tectural features of the grounds. 



JUNIORS TO HOLD SMOKER 



A junior smoker will be held Wed- 
n,s.l:i\ .yening at 7 o'clock in the 
Social I'nion. Prof. Hicks will be 
the principal speaker. A musical 
program has been arranged, after 
which refreshments will be served. 



FRESHMAN SQUAD CLOSES 

VERY SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

A 6 to win over Holyoke High 
closed the freshman football sched- 
ule Saturday. The season was a very 
successful one, with a record of four 
victories to one defeat, and a total 
score of 64 points for the freshmen as 
against 40 for their opponents. The 
first game was played with Suffield, 
Oct. 7, and the 33 to defeat may 
be partly attributed to the fact that 
Suffield had already played two 
games, while the Aggie youngsters 
had not yet quite "gotten together." 
Oct. 14, a slow game was won from 
Hartford High school, 7 to 0. The 
following Saturday Worcester North 
High was defeated 39 to 0. In this 
game the freshmen showed real foot- 
ball, the line held well, and tha back- 
field made consistent gains. Oct. 
2«, Monson was defeated on their 
own field, 12 to 7. The team played 
exceptionally well in all departments, 
and clearly outclassed their oppo- 
nents. In the final game with Hol- 
yoke, the freshmen were at their best, 
and showed clearly that they had 
some good material for next year's 
varsity, particularly in the backfield. 
Among the individual stars brought 
forth under Coach Gore's teaching 
were Captain Gorwau, Readio and 
McLeod in the line, Vigezzi, Lent 
and Cande in the backfield and Dew- 
ing as a punter. 



Cox Sons & Vining 

7 a Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

u for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 




RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. MaMacbuaeui 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



The Heat Place to Dine 
All Kindt of Sea Food 

Special luncheon from U-8Q to 2 i> m 

—A la cart* »«rvle« — 

6-30 a. m. to 11-30 p. m. 



R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 




K. QraywHi, If 
Holmes, It 
Spatililiiik'. Ig 
Knliert.t. . 
I »ii nn. rg 
KdwarnV i' 
Day. re 

F. UraywMi. i)l> 
Pond, il»ii 
Boles, rhl» 
Week*. fl> 



will i wi- 
re, Bacon 
rt, Hftliled 
rij. Brewer 
.-. trekss 
lis. W rig in 
rt. ('lilloitl 
I.-. |)n>wn 
■ jli (.ilTunl 

riii», O'Brien 

Ilib, MHa'hh 

tl>. I . W In 



N. A. A.. TO GIVE MEDALS 

The non-iuliletic board recently 
adopted Aft appropriate medal to be 
awarded to members of the Roister 
Doisters, the musical clubs, the 
C.mk;ivn board, and the debating 
club. The 'It-sign of the medal on 
one tide \» l composite representing 
tin" above non-athletic activities. 
The reverse side is a blank on which 
will be engraved the owner's name, 
length of time in particular club, and 
position held therein. 

The awarding of such a medal has 
been decided upon, not only as an 
honorable compensation for activities 
in non-athletics, but as an incentive 
to increase interest in these organi- 
sations. 



ICE CREAM LABORATORY 

Flint laboratory, ever known on 
the eampua at the fcewt of inova- 
tions and big thing*, is imrily ocm- 
pied in installing a new ice cream 
laboratory. The staff of the dairy 
major are hoping that &* new de- 
partment will serve the twofold pur- 
pose of inatrnttion along modern 
lines in ice cream making as well as 
becoming a paying preposition in 
itself. Every other department la 



INFORMAL SATURDAY 

Saturday the first informal of the 
year will be held in the Drill Hall. 
The Mt. Holyoke chaperon will be 
Miss Wheeler, Brigham hall, while 
the two ehaperones from Smith will 
be announced as the men purchase 
their tickets. The music will be 
furnlabed by Boaworth of North- 
ampton. A large attendance is 
looked for not only from the student 
body but from the 1316 alumni. 

Tickets are on sale by W. R. 
Irving *17, 18 South college. 



COMMITTEE ON INTERCLASS 
ACTIVITIES STARTS WORK 

At the first meeting of the inter 
class athletic board Kmory Gray- 
son '17. was elected president, P. G. 
Harlow '17, vice-president, O. G. 
Pratt * 18, secretary and Harold M. 
Gore, faculty manager. It was de- 
cided by the board that the meetings 
should be run under parliamentary 
law, and that this would suffice for a 
constitution. 

The board votdd that the annual 
Sophomore-Freshman football game 
be played Nov. 11, 1916, at 2-.J0 p. 
M., while the Sophomore- Freshman six- 
man rope-pull will come off at 8-80 on 
the following Saturday, Nov. 18,on the 
old field between South College and 
the Drill Hall. The matter of rifle 
matches was brought up and it was 
voted that they be left to the military 
department. Bolts, '17, and Good- 
win '1«, were appointed as a commit- 
tee to draw op rules the award- 
ing of numerals. Harlow M7 and 
Carpenter *19, were appointed aa a 
committee to decide upon the method 
of electing class managers. Numer- 
als are to be given in cross country 
to the first five men who finish exclu- 
sive of Varsity track men. By this 
ruling numerals were awarded to 
Lyons, Schwartz, Gordon, Mitchell, 
all 1918 men and Chapin, 1919, 
these being the first five men who ' 
were not "M" men, to finish in] 
the interclaas run Oct. 21. One of 
the duties of the representatives of 
each claae is to keep the class inform* ' 
ed of the business transacted at each 
ting. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that if the boys want 

to have their shoes tapped 

with the best quality of 

leather, drop in 

and see 

J. OINSBURO 

ii^ Amity Street 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts. 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 




For 



UN 



DOUBLE SERVICE 
Tint 



ijmmmms 

Punctureproo! 



**S5S?too«™M3W-rBf m; 
fii. B-XSrJlr givw tt""^ 




THran Urea exoel an (WMia xor a»* •"■-n 

and -Mlllentu any ©Ugrr -wwpaUa tin-** 
ai r space and pressure touwtlM urn* .-.<• 
urea m*4aandu«nedwn«i«UMBtQ*tMB»- 

h.nr ixmtue S^^^JM^S^ilJmnSi 



I 11 MI 

n.w x«m not lncrodad In •!**!* 




^TerSiT Payment wlUs order** at***"^. 
JST» W* duconn* alio..* on ord«' 
wo«f.iw»»tt£S — 4U ^ 
personal cnec*» wa» M ^/^ 

ea. BolddlwoiMjy BoUB iJ , 

'**• 111 *miB»**j 

SerrtceTtr* *\|\Aes«t> <"*i 
Co.. Akroo.0. ^p*** 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



NOTICE 

There will he a meeting of the In- 
formal Committee Wednesday even- 
ing at <>-30 in room 12, North Col- 
lege. A full attendance is requested. 
R. W. Smith 



TWO NEW BULLETINS 

Manuscripts for two bulletins have 
been sent to the State Supervisor of 
\<liuinistration and when passed by 
him will appear as Experiment Station 
publications. The first is on Shade 
Trees, their diseases and care, writ- 
ten by Dr. 6. E. Stone former head 
of the Department of Botany at M. 
A. C and an authority on shade trees. 

The second, by Prof. W. L. Ma<h- 
mer, is a survey of the cost and 
methods of production ami marketing 
<if onions in the Connecticut Valley, 
bids are also being received for the 
(Minting of the annual inspection bul- 
letins for feeds and ferttlizeis. 



SOLAR PLEXUS OR POINT 

OF JAW SAYS SIXESMITH 

If a man insults you. steals your 
watch, or bumps into you, hit him in 
(be solar plexus or on the point of 
his j:iw, advises Mr. Sixesmith, an 
tdvocate Of boxing its an exert'ise 
and fighting as a defense, who is 
giving a course of boxing lessons 
here, Mr. Sixesmith fought In the 
ring nh ••Tommy Murphy" and has 
been through forty battles with no 
•lefeats. He cornea here with a 
national teputatiou and 100 seta of 
h> ounce gloves. 

•I trained Koosevelt for his Afri- 
can trip," he declared, to the students 
:is he spoke to groups of them. He 
bu recruited a class of 18 Aggie men 
>n<l two from Amherst college, to 
whom he gives five lessons a week in 
the drill hall at 5 p. m. 



Commission, address 518 Main St., 
Worcester, spent the week end at col- 
lege. "Nubbie" Adams acted as 
chauffeur. 

Other Dairy Show visitors, "Jim" 
O'Brien, Gaskill, Ben Allis, B. J. 
Kelley, MacDougall, Coleman. Crist- 
man, Bullard. etc. 

Glover E. Howe, the Harvard 
Medic, now living in the big city, 
address 133 Peterboro St., Boston. 

Headle "M" and "Heinie,' Good- 
enough are running a farm "some- 
where" in the state but to date we 
haven't been able to definitely locate 
them. Kinder please return, reason- 
able reward. 



1914 NOTES 

There are a few men who have 
delayed or forgotten their $2.75 lax, 
for this year's insurance premium. 
If those men would kindly remit said 
sum at once to L. A. Webster. Black- 
stone, it will save the expense to the 
class of getting out a few duuning 
letters and help the class to get a 
proper start for the coming year. 

Geo. C. Churchill, orchardist at the 
Worcester Home Farm. He says, 
••Orcharding at the Home Farm is 
now a sort of infant industry but it 
has good possibilities for growing." 

C. H. Peters expects to spend the 
winter in Cooperstown, N. Y. This 
summer he spent his time on the 
invalid trees around Grand Mere. P. 
i}. Canada. 

R. K. Handy Is the only fanner 
among '14 reporting a pleasant and 
profitable summer. He is raising 
chickens in Cacaumet. 

Jeff Calvert has retired from active 
fruit growing and is assistant mana- 
gei of a general Btore in New l/>ndon. 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are ioie agents foi the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 

Shirts, made especialh foi college men, from $1.50 tO $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 U P- 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Ready Ui-\\eai (lollies tor "OlWg men from Atterbun Ss stein- Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Made-to-vour-niiasuie Clothes, from $25.00 up. 

Mr. Campion personally superintends to tittini/, in 
ihis department and is in expert in the business, 

Ok I of in k Best Custom Tailokikc Department* in the Staik 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS 6L0VES 



KNOTHE BELTS 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE a1« 



Conic 10 us lot 



NO PROFIT IN SELLING 

MILK AT FOUR CENTS 

Recent experiments carried out 
under the supervision of the exten- 
sion service show that the actual cost 
of milk production often exceeds the 
•piling price accepted by the farmer. 
It has been found that the foot! cost 
Of ii quart of milk is S.'d'.l cents, cost 
for care and supplies 2. Of) cents. 
From these figures it can be seen 
that the farmer with a grade Jersey 
herd giving 6000 pounds of milk 
yeartv per cow, testing .i percent fat, 
should receive 5.4 cents a quart at the 
' m in order to get a fair market 
price for his roughage and $35 lalior 
per cow yearly. The producer sell- 
ing milk at 4 cents a quart, according 
to Dr. Lindsey, in Extension Bulletin 
S '■■• 1 1 , cannot make money. 



1913 NOTES 

•John L. Haver of South Boston 
ha« recently been appointed principal 
of one of the Boston schools by the 
•ohool lioard of that illustrious town. 

Gorman R. Clark, president engi- 
neer for the Massachusetts Highw&v 



1916 NOTES 

Clinton K. Goodwin 'Hi who has 
been with the M. A. C. landscape 
department since graduation is now 
with a drafting company in Hartford. 
Conn 

From the city of Hmktield, Me., 
came a letter from .Sax Clark, who is 
working with the Maine Fruit Growers' 
Exchange "Sax" may be addressed 
at Buckfleld. in care of K. E. Conant. 

••Tv" Rogers has started on his 
graduate work in landscape at Har- 
vard. Ty't brush and comb arson 
the bureau at M Perkins Hall. Cam- 
bridge. 

•>BiH"Coley is teaching botany in 
the high school at Wilton, ft. 

•Charlie" Gould is letting people 
know alwut the college, and has an 
office in South, across the hall from 
Mr Watts. The scientific name of 
hU position is Field Agent, but it is 
possible that Field Dtiver would be 
better, as Charlie moves from place 
to place in one of "Don's" chevs. 

•Don" Sherinyan has remained in 
Amherst with the avowed intention 
of selling automobiles. If Don can't 

| rontlnqed « i»§» «I 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad t<> ^'•• , you- 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR forty yrast MS h**<" »cndrf«j faithful trtvice. For forty 
year* we h*?r tried to make each year's ierwee mor* nearly 
ideal riii* untinna effort ha* built for ui not only Th« World * 
Ufgeit Mi.! Ot<]«r 3«-d Bwmeii, 1*1 «l« « World Wide 
rrputalion f-.r Effkien. y atnl undii|ju1»>d leaderihif.. The 
F..ttirth Anniversary Edition of Burp**** Afllittsi. tkm 
"Leading American Seed CaUlof " is brighter and 
better dwft eta. It ■ mailed free. A postcard wist bring rt. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower.. 

Burpee Buildin.i PhiJ**Ulplw» 



F*atee>*« «l*o«3 Store 

Larg est Sl ot k — Low rst Pric»--> 
I£*ci>«*i-t Kepnirliiu; lt*-«f U'lither ia.ve»cl 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



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Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 








The Maitachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O. LANt'HKAR '18, M'ifing Editor 
MU.KORO R. LAWRENCE *17. Assistant Editor 
WILLIAM 8AVILI.E. JR. '17. Alumni Editor 



A St*i II | \ I h KlUTOKH. 

.MMI.N I IH/KI! '17 

JOSEPH K. WHITNEY '17 
KRANK J. MINKS Ms 

NATHAN W. UlLLETTE II 

KDWAKI) N. MIT< HELL IS 
BLIOT H. BLKKIM '19 

MYliTON K. EVANS '19 



BUSINESS DKI'A KTMENT. 
MEKRILL V. WARNER M7, Business Manager 
JAMES <'. POWELL "18. 

Assistant Business Manager 
BIRHER R. ROHEUIIST '18. 

Advertising Manager 



Subscription $:MK) per year. Single 
copies, * cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In ease ol change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager us shoii as possible. 

Entered as sernnd-r last mattar at the Amherst 
Post OftVe 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Nov. 7. Ho. 6 

Tin loan of tieorge I). Melican as 
active beat) CfMtcfa of the football team 
for the remainder <>f the season, 
though unavoidable, i« indeed to be 
regretted. Coining as it did, directly 
before the game with Tufts, it ap- 
peared almost disastrous, but the 
showing 111:11 If l»T the team in that 
game proved that Melican had suc- 
ceeded in instilling permanently the 
fighting spirit of the Urides coached 
elevens of the last three years, into 
these men, which alone is an achieve- 
ment worthy of great credit. The 
burden of maintaining this spirit at 
its highest notch now falls upon the 
two assistant c inches, and more than 
ever before is needed now the unflinch- 
ing self-sacrificing support of the 
eutire student body. It is time for 
us to proit our loyalty. 



or comeback one way or another. 
The forum was intended as a place 
for the free expression of opinion ; 
the attitude of the student body has 
thus far made it a place for the sup- 
pression of opinion. 

Aggie meu have a peculiar sense 
of what constitutes loyalty. It seems 
to be an unwritten law here that it is 
poor spirit to criticize college insti- 
tutions which have accumulated a 
sort of sacred tradition. Would it 
not be better to discuss these things 
in perfect frankness, finding out the 
good and the bad. and seeking the 
remedy ? Because a custom is old 
does not prevent its growing useless 
with the passing of time, neither are 
innovations to be despised simply 
because "it never has been so." Let 
us hear at future forums some real 
opposition. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

In order to make the drill hall 
available for varsity basketball, 
which is to be introduced for the 
first time in Aggie this winter, por- 
tions of the board ceiling will be re- 
moved at each end. This was nec- 
essary as the latter was much too 
low to facilitate good playing. 

A place to put your Ford ! After 
a month's labor the sophomore class 
in rural engineering has completed a 
garage. 

Forty seniors and 60 juniors have 
taken no chapel cutB ! Have you 
forgotten, oh ye mighty, that morn- 
ing sleep is beneficial? 



« 



BIDE-A-WEE 



>» 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty —And other good things to r»i 
MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. «I5-W 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKIil'I.AK RUNDAV -KKVICK AT 7 P. M 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

I Notices for this column should be dropped In 
at the roLMtoiAK office or handed to Nathan 
W.UIIlette Ms on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each Issue.l 

Wkhnksh a\ , \«>v. X 

2-10 I', m.— Assembly. Harry II. While 
15. 

(MB P. M.- SiiH-kbridui' club, Koum 114 
SliM-kbrbisie hall. 

7-lHi p. m.— MiiTobiulnuy Hub, Microbi- 
ology Building. 

7-00 i\ m. -Orchestra rehearsal, Old 
Chapel. 

H-IHI P. M. — .luiiim smoker. 

THtntanAi N«iv. '.» 
u-:«i p, m. V. M. C A. 
7-OUi'. Jl.— Glee club rehearsal, obi 

Chapel 

8 V ITIiH W, \<U . 1 I 

•j-:hi c. m.— Varsity football, M. A. C 

vs. Williams at Williamsi.iwu. 

MQ», g,«— Cross-country M. A. C vs 
Williams at Williamstown. 

«-46 p, «.— root ball. IhIM vs. IM8 
at Mumni Field. 

:i-:t(> p. m. — Informal, Drill hall. 
Si miav. Nov. 1) 

l»-00 \. m. -Mi ud ay chapel, Dr. Kit-hard 
C. 1 1 Hi; hex, I*re»hyterian 
ibiirch, Madison, Wis. 



1 



Axv thoughtful person attending 
the forum last Wednesday could not 
but have been irnpreaaed with the 
scarcity of opinion on the »uhjecta 
under discussion. Was it becaoaa 
♦At students had do ideas or because 
they all were in absolute agreement 
and therefore saw no need to speak? 
To think that here was a body of 
Aggie men without a thought in their 
heads would indeed be a sad indict- 
ment of their intelligence. No more 
can we believe that the entire student 
body was in perfect accord with every- 
thing discuised. Yet Hip fact re- 
mains that there wai do discussion at 
all. only a dumb aequiesenca on the 
part of tit many to iba remarks of a 
■mall number of man. la it any 
wonder that ten per cant of tka stti- 
dent body controls W per cent of the 
activities of the college? The great 
majority of Aggie men are evidently 
content to go blindly on playing fol- 
low the leader, with never * comment 



METAWAMPE ORGANIZES 



Faculty Outdoor Club Meets for 
Election of Officers. 

That the Metawampe club still 
holda the interest of faculty lovers of 
outdoor life was well shown last 
Wednesday, when the club met 
to elect otlicers for the coming 
year. Prof. C. H. Thompson was 
chosen president, and K. A. dishing 
Smith secretary of the organization, 
while K. II. Korbush was elected to 
the office of chief trek master. These 
three officers form the executive com- 
mittee which maps out the program 
of tieks for this year. Formerly in- 
cluding among its membership both 
students and professors Metawampe 
has gradually become more and more 
a faculty outdoor club. Frequent 
hikes, parties, and other stunts are 
put through each year which are 
greatly enjoyed by the faculty 
♦♦trekkers." 



FIRST YEAR MEN WIN A 
CLOSE GAME FROM H0LY0KE 

Playing high class football, the 
freshman team defeated Holyoke 
High school last Thursday on Alumni 
Field, 6-0. Although the score was 
close, the "Aggie" youngsters showed 
themselves much superior to their 
opponents, especially on the offense. 
The defense of both teams was of 
high order, Holyoke twice holding the 
freshmen for downs when the latter 
were within the ten-yard line Hol- 
yoke received the kickoff , but a fum- 
ble gave the "Aggies" the ball on the 
twenty-yard line. A few rushes were 
sufficient to put the ball over, I^ent 
making the score. 

Although the Paper City hoys were 
not able to get within the freshmen's 
forty-yard line, they were strong 
enough to prevent further scoring, at 
times by narrow margins. Lent's 
gains around the ends and Cande's 
strong line plunging featured the 
freshmen's offense, while Captain 
Gorwaiz and Readio played well in 
the line. 

\|. \. i . WHO. IIOI.VOKK II - 

Carleton. Ic re, Sparrow, Clifford 

(iorwaiz. It r >- Mahoney 

Keadio, Ik r tf- »<»"« 

Bacon, c «•- Hurley 

Md.eod, Hunker, m Itf, Dowling 

Tahnadge, Dewing, n ii.tiajte 

Dewing, Gray, re le, Turcot t 

Vige/.Ki, < ( b -|b, Merriman 

Unt, Ihb '-lib. Swords 

Mallon.rhh lhb.D.tbw 

Gray, Cande. ft ft» Uarvey 

Srore— -M. A. C. WW «, Holyoke 11. B. 
0. Touchdown— Lent. Referee — Ken- 
nedy of Amherst. I'mpire - -McNuti oi 
Ohio Stale. Head lineMinan, Hicks, of 
Ypsilanti. Time 10 minute periods. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cui 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 
Telephone SOO 



HENRY ADAMS & GO, 

The REXALL Store 



PRESIDENT MURLIN WILL SPEAk 

Dr. L. H. Murlin, president of Bos- 
ton University will give the annual 
Phi Kappa Phi address at the assem- 
bly exercises one week from tomor- 
row. At that time the new elections 
from the senior class to the honorary 
scholarship society will be announced. 
Dr. Murlin has been a very success- 
ful president of B, U. aince 1910, and 
is ranked as one of our leading educa- 
tors. An informal luncheon will be 
given in his honor at Draper Hall 
Wednesday noon by the members of 
the local chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. 



INDISPUTABLE PROOF OF 

THE BETTER QUALITY OF 

DE LAVAL SEPARATED CREAM 



Ttae in.'*! iniiHirtiiiit of all htuur woriftff 
contests are those that take plzre at rh* 
National Convention of the National BattC* 
makers' AwMiHatimi. held in rct-nt pMfl a 
conjunction with the National Oaifl i»S* 
The fi rut nn«e winner* at ever? < >"> I 
nf the Association since Its organ ty4(ii"n * 
1W2 have all hc-en I>e l„n ;il oners 

Such evidence of the SUMCtM i|«;.i |n "' 
cream produced by the l»e I .aval C f*W 

rator no cow .•« m.t c#f 

«iilerinii the pari 
a cream Stpai ll 
afffird to 01 1" 1 "" 1 

T» prodac s in 

hntter yon mu/«i fcs**l 
fine iinallti at ' "' ;l '' 
unil to ff*1 I In- bsH 
cream yon MM 
l*e Laval « teas 
tor. 



THE DE LAM SEPARATOR COMPANY 




lUfi BhoMiw V\ 
NKVV YUlIK 



2V» K. Mc 



fill* *<W 



LEAVES M. A. C. FOR ARMY 

H. K. Foster Receives Commmission 
as Second Lieutenant 

Hamilton K. Foster "IN will leave 
college this week to entei the United 
Mates Army as a second lieutenant. 
Word was received Saturday that his 
August exHiniiiHtionH were success- 
fully passed, and his commission 
based on the results will soon he re- 
ceived. Mr, Foster has always been 
intensely interested in military work, 
and was u cadet second lieutenant 
in the M. A. ('. regiment. He is a 
member of the Commons Club and 
was majoring in landscape gardening. 



SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN TENNIS 

With onlv one more match to he 
played, the sophomores have practi- 
cally clinched the title of champions 
in the interclats tournament with the 

freshmen. Tlledotililes matches have 
resulted as follows : 

Skinner and Ituffum 'lit defeated 
UidiHids aiid Home '•-'<» <! 2. I-U. 6-4. 

M.iiist-ll ami Kowe '19 defeated 
Silverman and Snow *'JO '2-fi. 0-0, 6-;i. 

The final doubles scheduled hetweeu 
Spanieling :.nd W. F. Smith '19 vs. 
Newell and Dixon ':»0 will be played 
off this week. 



STUDENT FORUM 

Discussion on Dining Hall, Social 

Union and College Songs. But- 
trick '17 Presides. 

••The right to express an opinion 
in public" was nut exercised to any 
great extent in the forum opened 
iu Wednesday assembly, which was 
introduced by Dr.Sprngue, and pre- 
sided over by Huttrick '17. The din- 
ing hall, the social uniou and the col- 
lege song were the topics, all handled 
from one side mostly as there was 
little opposition. 

Hnckmau *17 attacked the poor 
spirit on which a recent petition was 
started complaining against some 
spaghetti served at a dinner last 
week. He considered the food the 
beat that could be put out at present 
prices and exhorted the men to re- 
frain from criticism if thev couldn't 
.■;it at the dining hall. ( liailinan 
liiittrii k then asked to bear from the 
opposition. 

Thaser '17 thought thai the service 
was rather slow, ami was t'»l<l that 

WOllId be corrected as the system got 
ninler way. 

The attendance at the social union 
entertainments has been very small 
on some occasions, anil there is a 
problem of the quality of entertain- 
ment that the men want "Is it 
movies, <>r something better?'' asked 
Spaukiing 17. He then told how 
the movies are self-supporting and 
fairly well attended but that the 
other affairs suffer by small numbers 
in the audience. 

L. I), Kelsey then told of a student 
here who would uot specialize be- 
cause he would be unable to talk intel- 
ligently with graduates of academic 
colleges. Admitting that we are a 
vocational college, and that special- 
ized training is a good thing, Kelsey 
argued that we needed other things 
to set the college on a higher plane, 
.biat as in Home where the forum was 
originated, we should take interest in 
beauty, democracy and humor and keep 
alive in the student body an idea of 
'•nit ure. 

Btittrick then referred to the ten- 
dency to relax at the week end by 
going out of town for entertainment. 
Tins was natural but we should sup- 
l»ort our own affairs with more than 
Ml hi a UK) students. 

Huckman decried the too pro- 
miscuous singing of the college song 
ini said that both the Senate and 
Ailelphia wished that leaders of mass 
ffiietiBgs and others would not 
'all for the song except on some anf( j u f iH began to "pen u l» w i' n 
•-liege occasion. overhead attack. OiwB made 90 

mm yards on a pass from Wesoott, bring- 

annouocement that » fissure ing the ball to the sT-jard line, 
htt appeared in Princeton's new' where Keefe's attempt at a field goal 
',- too stadium for a time caused went wide of the poata, Aggie took 
t consideration among the stu- ! the plgakin on the SO-yird hue, but 
•i.-tbodv. Expert engineers from ' after two unsuccessful plays rmwt i 
»fw York, however, claim that the fumble which Tufts recovered. 1 1« 
is ioconaequential and will half ended with the ball m Tuft. 
... structural weakness in the posaewion on the Aggie «.yard b™- 
. , lu Weicolt's wide end runs netted 

i 



ROISTER D0ISTERS MEET 

At a meeting of the Roister Dois- 
ters Dramatic Society last Wednes- 
day, the following olllcers were 
elected : Lewis T. Buck man of Wilkes 
Harre. IV. president ; t'harles R. 
Wilber of Walpole, vice-president ; 
John A. ( hapman of Salem, secretary. 

The society has under eoiisideiulion 
three shows, one of which will be 
selected as the Junior From play. 
Manager Williams announces that 
try-outs for the cast will be held 
within a month at the latest. 



BETTER LATE THAN NEVER 
"Touchdown," the new football 
song by Anderson and Spaukiing 
failed to go on sale at assembly 
because of some accident at the prin- 
ter's. The song will lie out soon 
however. Copies will be for sale on 
the catiipua. 



Syracuse varsitv football men are 
to have two practices a day. At 7 
o'clock in die morning the men will 
meet at the Stadium in their street 
clothes and go through the defensive 
formations. 

TUFTS OAME 

P ..ntinnpii fnnii (**« H 



lung gains for Tufts during the 
opening minutes of the second half 
and he was soon pushed over the line 
for the second touchdown of the 
game. Aggie came back stronger 
than ever after the next kickotT, 
however, and held the ball most of 
the time, with Pond the principal 
ground-gainer. The Maroon team 
gained on each exchange of kicks, 
and on one occaasion (J ray son 
changed what would have been a loss 
into a gain, by recovering the ball 
when tKe punt had been blocked by a 
Tufts playei and making it first 
down after a 30-yard run. 

Stops Chance to Score 
Karly in the last period Pond got 
away from the crowd on a long run 
around Tufts right end and looked 
certain to score, but he was downed 
bv Hopkins on the ID-yaid line. 
Tufts again got possession of the 
ball and by a clever combination of 
forward passes and open field play 
worked down to within ten yards of 
the Aggie goal, where the defense 
strengthened. Line bucks brought 
the ball in three plays to the 6-yard 
line, however, from where Hopkins 
plunged through center for the third 
score. Forward passes became a 
part of the Aggie attack after the 
kickoff ami though none succeeded 
they kept the Tufts men guessing. 
Swanson then intercepted one of 
Pond's long heaves and whs downed 
on the 88-yard line, ttaine by Wes- 
coM and hoanc gave Tufts first down 
on Aggie's •.'M-yard line, and a long 
forward, Wescott to Olson, resulted 
iu the final touchdown. Foi the rest 
of the game the Aggie team came 
back strong and worked the ball into 
Tufts territory, but failing on two 
successive ftirwnrdM lost the pigskin 
to Tufts just before the final whistle 
blew. 

Iu spite of the score, the Aggie 
line put up one of the strongest fights 
of the year and forced Tufts to the 
limit for every yard, Grayson and 
Day were down under every punt, 
and Tufts' gains on the runback were 
negligible as nearly always the run- 
ner was downed in his tracks. 
The lineup- 
it r-TM M V «, 
Lincoln, le re. !>ay 

w. Brown, U n. fcdward*. Majre)*r<dn 

Morrison, .splint. I'uwent, 

II. Brown, I« ru, liunn 

Pryi»r, Watson. . ■ KolrerlM, Tllbin 

Powers, Abjar, r« 

In, Ooodwln, is|iatildtnif, Itlanehorrl 
Bea«h»m, Hairsrem. Abbott, rf 

If, Uolme-M 
Sanborn. Olaon, re h-« K. (4 ray win 

liratt, .letTcrv. [lofkitm, ijh 

qb, K. tiravsoti 
hwansoii. Kecle. 1 hi* rhb. Boles 

Wf-.M-iitt, rhl. Ihb, Pond 

J,,,,,,,,.. Hi th. Weeks. Whittle 

h.-..re lulls m, M. A.f.O. Tinieh. 
,|.iwi» -Beacham. W»-s«-i.tt, ironMns, 
oUnti. twain from loucbdowun Wei 
r( ,il 4 rni|iire M.ii.ri' of Mam. 

Keferee * arpenlerol Harvard Lines- 
tiit-n Green >•! Harvard and i,»-siii of 
lutt* I hi. ei William <'f M \ ' 
Tiiiie tiitir 16-niiiiiite periods, 



TMK 



United States Hotel 



n.;i. li, Lincoln . i nil Kingston Htn 
BOSTON, rtA5S. 



Onl> Inn IiIimKh limn Sniilli I rl mllitil IWa 

t tun, and *-hfi|1> rsiacbnl fnun v.iriti suitlmi 
in Kii'Miii'ii h'.iitn.o. and i .mi I'liiiMit alike 

In tin- itn-ut ri't;iilisln>|"* . 1 1 1 • I I ill-tut.-* •■• -nl n-. 

a 1st i in tin- tiit-uiiit .iii.i iii.'i. ."-> ••! iiiiiTi-Mt . 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Talili' and iei \ In- iiiij.ui ii.kb.'.I 
ISii.iklt-i unit ini«|.M'iit ii|i.m ;i|it>Ui"it inn 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 



fountain l*enn 



\ici-iit* fur !(••« I v i,t» i til". 



l\ M. CUKRAN 



C.tV. I>VI*K 



MARSH'S SAM1ARN 

Students' Furniture 

RHUS ANIJ carpi: is 

I 1 1 HARKH KKTATK 

||.*iiHt ••*!•„ I «»': 
Stki-ii I.N Imnk Vnll.hU Inc. 

\t A"* IIHl-IIHISII JKWKI.KI's 



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PINH A.NI> KIM.S jt 

Hill II. «II.PI»H « ■*!• NHIIN7I> Msn«n* 

— JOIN THE BUNCH AT 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

No* located iivit pott . iin •■ it >- 

Pressing aid Cleaning a Specialty 

I il-t.,1 I ,, kPt >.y^l B tn Iff M 

College Stationery 

With Cta*B Num.. . .1 

Magazines, News|>apers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

liVitii High Sl 
SELLS 

Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Cowie Himii in flolvuke and nee imii 
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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Hine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe. VfclWHI 
ind Fittings for Steam. Water and (.a*, \sbesto* 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Covering*. I ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill supplies. Lngmeers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot \\ater Heating. 
AutomaticSpnnkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. Holyoke. «m 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hoar*- 9 to 12 a. ra.. 1-30 to ft p. in 



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lUJCK.MAxN'!! 

Candies and Ice Cream 



»* II AIVI1 J *' 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner o( Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is ■ modern hos 
te°ry run on the European Plan It is ,ust a step 
from Main Street, away from the noisf and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its room* are well furnished and co miQI '»>?]«• 
ha»ing a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices • I and up: rooms 
with bath (single) •l.ft« and up. 

Its excellent cuisine anJ well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant »»e moT y.T7* r n ^ 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the H.ghland Hotel once and I vou will 
»nticiDate staying there again. «««' «*ery 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the time to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletin, 



HkMhimI Hotel, 



>,ulnKli.l.l. «■■•• 



Johnson Book Co. 



Babuitt 



Wo.MAVORTH 



1916 NOTES 

[Continued from page 3] 

Bell machines, is there anyone who 
can? The noes have it. 

When last heard from "Stan" 
Prouty ami "Ted" Richards were on 
their way to the Philippines, where 
they are lieutenants in the Constabu- 
lary. Address them in care of the 
Philippines Constabulary, Bagnio, 
V. I. 

"Bone" Caldwell's address is Box 
288, Westboro. The author of the 
class motto is poultry manager for 
the Westboro State Hospital. 

"Chink" Chamberlain ex-'16, is 
working ou the staff of the Boston 
Transcript 

"Duke" Curran '16 visited his 
many friends on the campus one day 
last week and helped put "pep" in 
the freshman eleven. 

.John t'aidarelli '16 is on the cam- 
pus for a short stay. 

Arthur Hendry is farming ou the 
estate of Mr. Paul Cunningham, 
Bolton. Mass. 

Tommy Uarrocks, chemist, care of 
Powers- Weightman-Rosengarten, 916 

Purish St.. Philadelphia, Pa. His 
work at present is analysis of a large 
variety of compounds, ranging from 
telegraph nitrate to putrate of lead. 
Tommy recently passed up a good 
Job elsewhere, which only goes to 
show, etc. 



Justin Hemenway, farmer, Wil- 
liamsburg, Mass. 

Harold Aiken, assistant field 
agent, care of Plymouth County 
Trust Co., Brockton, Mass. Ails 
always was good at the banks. 
(Squib please copy.) 

"Whistle" Woolley is orchards 
for Mr. Elliott D. Curtis, Bantam. 
Conn. "It takes," Whis writes. 
"about seven weeks for a postal card 
to get to the top of this hill." 

The following sixteen '16 men hove 
to at the U. S. hotel after the Tufts 
game : Potter. Gould, Haskell, Cush- 
ing, Schlotterbeck, Chamberlain, 
Topham, Simmons, Little, Palmer, 
Gioiosa, Mattoon, Hall, Curran. 
Walkden. 

The secretary respectfully sug- 
gests that class notes be Baved in 
the M-book for reference. 

Please keep us neck-and-neck with 
what you are doing. Send news of 
'16 men (past, present and future) to 
"Pete" Simmons, 34 Boylston St., 
Pittsfield. 



Vlplui Siu'ina l'lii llmiM- 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Thomas A. Edison received the 
degree of doctor of laws from the 
University of the State of New 
York over the telephone. Mr. Edison 
was in his laboratory at Orange. N. 
J., while Dr. Finley, who conferred 
the degree, was in the auditorium of 
the New York Education building. 



Sunt 1 1 
"Ull llllll ip» 



tchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *ND POULTRY URRSSHRS 

\\ 1|<»I I.SVI.K OM.V 

Beef. Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



BhirkHiom-. tenth and s«-n!i EWm Rtwii, 
BOSTON, ...- flASS, 




A 




AGGIE MEN 



Get your suits cleaned and pressed 



by an 



ie Man 



MEN'S STORE 



Hats Furnishings 



at 



Agent lor ^ ^ BROWNINO, KINO & CO., 

K ' ' * Custom Tailor* 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKET ». * r ES YOU if, 



COPLEY SQUARE HOTEL 

* Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sta., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in ihe ciu. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY, 



(>rpfivUr St Morehous* 

PRINTERS, 



The Tailor Shop back of the 
Aggie Inn 



Open afternoons and evenings 

Thursday, Nov. 9. 



No. i. Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass, 



LARRY GAY, PROP 



A wealthy philanthropist has re- 
cently donated to the Bowery Mis- 
sion of New York the sum of $10,000 
which will be the basis for a 
fund to be used "for the benefit of 
poor and needy college graduates." 

The University of New Mexico is 
to he honored on the seventh of Oc^ 
tober by the installation of a chapter 
of Phi Kappa Phi. 

Cornell college, at Mt. Vernon, la., 
is just starting on a $1,000,000 
eiidowninent campaign. 



EXAMINATION FOR ARMY 

The next examination of candidates 
for provisional appointments as sec- 
i.iul lieutenants in the line of the 
Army will be held Jan. 29, 1917. 
Applicants for authority to undergo 
this examination should forward ap- 
plications to Adjutant General of the 
Army at u« early a date as practica- 
ble, and these must reach the Adju- 
tant's Otrice not later than Jan. loth. 



SOPHOMORES VS. FRESHMEN 

Saturday afternoon at 2-80 Ihe 
sophomores will face the freshmen in 
their annual interchips game. Tlie 
freshraeu will present the team which 
has just closed such a successful sea- 
son, while the sophomores will have 
a husky eleveu under the leadership 
of Captain Poole. 

About 20 men have reported for 
the sophomore team, most of whom 
played on the team last year. With 
a little grooming the sophomores 
expect to give the freshmen a battle 
roval from start to finish. 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA MEETS 

The biennial convention of Phi 
Sigma Kappa was held at the Ban- 
croft Hotel in Worcester Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday of last week. 
There were about 175 delegates pres- 
ent. Thursday night was devoted to 
an entertainment by the New England 
delegates to the convention, Friday 
and Saturday being given over to the 
business of the convention. Two 
new chapters were added to the fra- 
ternity, one at Nevada State Univer- 
sity and one at the University of 
Wisconsin. The convention closed 
with a banquet Saturday night, the 
principal speaker of the evening be- 
ing Dr. HoIHb, President of Worces- 
ter Polytechnic Institute. 



ONE YEAR POULTRY COURSE 

A new departure has been mad* 
this year in the form of a one year 
course in poultry husbandry. This 
is offered to those desiring thorough 
training in iioultrv work but who aiv 
unable to spend mor • than a year at 
the college. Ten students are taking 
the course, two of whom are young 
women. 

They study nothing but poultry 
until the Bhort course begins. Then 
they elect studies related t«» poultry 
which they pursue until spring comes, 
when they go back to the poultry 
work which lasts until the end of 
June. The course consists of lec- 
tures and laboratory work, the latter 
being an important feature. Kverv 
student does actual work earing f«»r 
hens. The spirit of the course is 
expressed in the official motto which 
is "Learn to do by doing." 

WHO iTcOROT? 

An interesting art exhibit in the 
form of :ifi famous landscapes bv (he 
painter Corot has been hung in Wil- 
der hall for the Study of the class in 
landscape gardening An exceptional 
opportunity is offered to get an idea 
of what constitutes real art, by look- 
ing at this fine collection of pictures. 






New Times, 
New Things 

The old krtilizer 

formulas are (jiving 

way to the new. At 

every farmers' meeting 

one subject should be 

the fertilizer formula 
tint will furnish a balanced ration to the crop and keep up the fertility 
of the soU. To do this the fertilizer should contain at least as much 

POTASH 

as Phosphoric Acid. Our note book has condensed fart- eternal 
in farmers' meetings and plenty of space to record the new tn»P 
that you hear. Let us send one to you before ^n-ittjcmejj 

A lupply of these ii furnished by request to every '< 
We win be glad to stenr.1 a supply delivered free 
w Farmers* Club Officer on request. 



(ii.ir«i 



It 



itair 



-very [n<titure, C i range 
dvertiang matter. 

German Kali Works, Inc., 42 Broadway, N«w York 

, ***** Block ^%5^» asssft r" ■* 



AtUnt*. F.mpirr Bldf . 



JUST 
A 



TIP! 



This year it's Sheepskin-lined Coats that Wave a clear field . 
Be sure you have yours before the "big" game; von will look 
"right" in one oi these big roomy routs and you won't know what 
it is to be cold. 

We have the largest line of these coats in the State and all we 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that we 
an- able to onVr you, Ask the man who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 






SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: S* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

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8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916. 



'i 



ALUMNI NOTES 

■Stv" Faiiai" wrh on the 



campus Monday fur u living visit. 

Kx-'|K.— Hubbard Swift made a 
short stay on the campus last week. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN PENS 



EXTENSION SERVICE TO 

GIVE TWELVE WEEK COURSE 

The short course announcements 
for 1916-17 are now being mailed hy 
tlie Extension Service to its numer- 
ous correspondents. Instead of a 
ten weeks' short course, as usual, 
a twelve weeks* course will be 
offered. Another unusual thing is 
to he noted, in that Farmers' week is 
to be scheduled for the Easter vacation 
time, this being due to the extension 
of the short course. The schedule 
follows : 

w l NIK li schools 

Twelve W eekV < kmiM I, 

Jan. I M;u. 23<i"<>.) 
Partner* u.-.-k. Mat. -in-Hun mi 

\ nuu.il IU-.-kci'|..i-> ("oiiveiilioii. 

Mai-. -'7 ii» fine.) 
I'ulish r»W»ri' I"> Mar. 32 

S.IkmiI for IUM'k»n|.i'i^. 

Dale ami place III l.e anuoum eil 
m MMi I si IIOOI.S 

Summer School ot Amiitdlure ami 

r.,imiry l.ih- July 2-31 (inf.) 

S.Imw.I for Hural Noeial Service, 

During .Inly 
School lot library Workers. 

.Inly tO-SMinc.) 
I'.niltty Convention, July 18 2« tta«.) 
Hofr ami Girls' Vuricultural Camps, 

During -inly 

< oiil.-i.i...' on Rural uiainii/atiaii. 

Hal.- I., be announced 



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Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following objects: 



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Rural Journalism 



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Forestry 

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Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



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OUR RULE 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Botany 
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For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



II 



INDEX TO BE BEST EVER 

Not a man in the class of l»tS 
can afford to be without a copy of 
tin* class index. In a special section 
devoted entirely to MM's own activi- 
ties, are shown all the great events 
in her history, and shown, not by 
dry reading, but by vivid pictures. 
Snapshots of those thrilling sceneB 
in the picture scrap and banquet sea- 
son are to l»e there, whole pages of 
them. And then there are two whole 
pages of snaps, showing the hand- 
somest, the laziest, the worst rough- 
housers, the most energetic, and all 
the rest of the shining lights. In 
addition to all these are two pages 
with :)'» snapshotion each page, where 
nearly every man in the class is seen, 
John J, trying to look pleasant, Van 
in his usual (rose. Pipe Ellis sporting, 
Goo Grayson— the soldier, Stevi 
with his hair just as slick as ever, 
Bob Holmes in his role as a magnate, 
Thomas Jefferson with his smile that 
wont tome off. This is the only 
chance you'll ever have to git such * 
collection of snapshots of your class, 
mates. But '17, "It* and '-Mi don't 
think for a minute that you are left 
out. You are all there, and think of 
it freshmen, you're tha first frosh to 
have a picture of the whole class in 
the Mm in years and years. If we 
told you half what is in that book, 
you wouldn't believe us, but jost 
wait and see ! **▼* 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

N on- Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index. 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

H. E. Robbins, Mauager 

L. T. Buckman, Piesident 

U. L. Holden, Manager 

K. D. Haw ley, Manager 

O. S. Flint, Manager 

M. R- Lawrence, Mauager 

N. Moorhouse, Manager 

S. F. Tuthill, President 

A. F. Williams, Manager 

I). M. Lipshires, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

D. O. Merrill, President 
E. L. King, President 

L. T. Buckman, President 
M.J. McNamara, President 



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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 14, 1916. 



VARSITY AND WILLIAMS veri »° n t is scheduled 
BATTLE TO STANDSTILL F0R commencement came 



Maroon and White Outplays Oppo- 
nents. Penalties Prove Costly. 
Neither Side Scores. 

M. A. C. played Williams college 
Saturday at Williainstowu to a one 
sided tie, if such a thing exists. 
The fact that the game ended with 
no score for either eleven is no cri- 
terion. 
Williams Expected Easy Victory 
According to newspaper repor ts 
previous to the game Williams ex- 
pected a contest in which she could 
warm up her subs. During the 
game it was noticeable that no sub- 
stitutes were used except in urgent 
cases. Outplaying Williams in both 
halves the Maroon team exhibited 
Biillicient strength to crush opposi- 
tion in successive plunges down the 
field, whicU, but for penalties, would 
have often threatened the opponent's 
goal line. 

The Game 
Williams kicked off and starting 
I march down the Held Aggie gained 
first down on three plays. An- 
other first down followed when Pond 
took the ball around right end for 
an aggravating gain, because it was 
~ followed by a lo-yard penalty for 
2 holding. After a couple of line 
attempts Aggie's kick was blocked 
and Williams recovered on the 10- 
yard line. The ball changed hands 
53 a^ain on a totichbuck when M. A. C. 
v recovered a forward in back of lbs 
. gt>al posts, and the ball came out to 
the 20-yanl line. First down was 
Wftde and then Aggie punted. The 
Purple's offense hit a stone wall and 
thej decided to kick. A couple «>f 
giiiu-, a ,'i-yard penalty, a left end 
nm and the Maroon gathered in !<• 
ywiU. losiug it a moment later by a 
ifl-yanl and then followed by a '»- 
janl penalty, forcing a kick, A 
tain mid an offside punt for Williams 
I Aggie the ball on the 25-yard 
nil. only to be recovered on downs. 
Al this point the opponents threat* 
•"fie.l Hie goal line. They gained 
two flnt downs before M. A. C, 
■«'ncd up and held them for 
n» on the 5-yard line. For the 
of the half the ball seesawed 
1 '" k and fotth across the field, 
«- gaining hy end runs and giv- 
to Williams on penalties. 
LContlButd en pact tj 



Three New Teams Appear on Base- 
ball Schedule. Season to Open 
April 19. 

Manager llawley has completed the 
baseball schedule for the coming sea- 
son. Three uew teams have beeu 
taken on this year, Wesleyan, Col- 
gate, and Conn. "Aggies". The 
schedule is unusually large, 17 games 
in all, beginning earlier and closing 
later than has been the custom, owing 
to the late Commencement. For this 
reason, the traditional commencement 
game with Amherst could not be ar- 
ranged, Vermont being scheduled for 
that date. The commencement game 
will be played on Monday instead of 
Saturday, because it is believed that 
more alumni will be able to attend if 
it occurs in the midBt of the com- 
mencement exercises, rather than at 
the beginning. 

The schedule : 
April 1'J— Springfield at Springfield, 
il— Trinity at Hartford. 
Id — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
•_»H — Conn. Aggies on Alumni 
Field. 
May 4— Middlebury at Middlebury. 
:» — Vermont at Rurliugton. 
10 — Colgate on Alumni Field. 
12_Middlebury on Alumni 

Field. " 
15— Wesleyan at MiddJetown. 
l!(_Springfleld On Alumni 

Kiel. I. 
20— Williams at Williamstown. 
2»— Boston College at lloston. 
:jo_ Tufts at Medford. 
June 2— Worcester Tech. at Wor- 
cester, 
g— Amherst at Alumni Field. 
IB— Amherst at Pratt Field. 
Vermont at Alumni Field. 
(Commencement) 



BASKETBALL CANDIDATES OUT 

Manager Moon-house announces 
that basketball practice will be held 
Tuesdays at 9 P. M and Fridays at 8 
p.m. The purpose of this practice 
is to condition the men so they will 
he able to compete with the football 
men who will report later. 

The following candidates have 
reported for practice 1 1017— Squires, 
Kverbeck; I91S— Oatatr, Hnwley; 
1919— Batchelder. McCarthy. Park- 
hurst, Sedgwick, Men trying out 
fur assistant manager »e Bond, 
Crowe and S track, all members of 
the Bopbomorf class. 



PHI KAPPA PHI ELECTS 

TWO FROM SENIOR CLASS 

Prof. Harmount Chosen as New Fac- 
ulty Member. Spring Elections 
Make Five Men from 1917. 

Lewis Taylor Buckmau of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. and Richard Wood worth 
Smith of Pittslield ure the two mem- 
bers of the senior class recently 
elected to membership in Phi Kappa 
Phi, the honorary scholarship frater- 
nity. William L. Harmount, instruc- 
tor in French, has laaen chosen a 
faculty member. Three other men 
from the class of 11)17 were elected to 
membership last suriog, Milford R. 
Lawrence of Falmouth, Roland W. 
Rogers of Braintree, and Almon W. 
Spaulding of Newtonville. 

Roth new undergraduate members 
have had time for other things In col- 
lege beside their studies. Kach has 
at one time been president of the 
class, and each holds membership in 
Adelphia and the college senate, 
Buckman being president of the lat- 
ter organization. 



FORM BOYS' CLUB 

About seventy-five boys, between 
the ages of ten and fifteen attended | 
meeting at College Hail on Monday 
night, for the purpose of forming a 
general organization of lioys in Am- 
herst and vicinity. 

The speakers of the evening were 
H. M. Gore and Nathan Gillette of 
M. A. C. ; M. J. Kennedy and 
George Renneyan of Amherst. The 
organization will be run jointly by 
M.A.C.and Amherst men, and if any 
Aggie men are interested in thiswoik 
Gillette *I8, who is hoys* secretary 
here, will be glad to interview them 
with respect to the organization work. 



NOTICE 
The increased cost of paper, 
labor, and everything connected 
with the publication of the Cot' 
legion makes it imperative that 
all subscriptions be paid promptly 
in order to meet the financial obli- 
gations of the paper. Subscribers 
will help materially by paying 
their $2 now, and their back sub- 
scriptions if they have any. 
MERRILL P. WARNER, 

Business Manager, 



No. 7 



FLOWER SHOW DRAWS 
MANY TO FRENCH HALL 

Wonderful Exhibit of Chrysanthe- 
mums. Prizes in Student and 
Commercial Classes. 

The chrysanthemum was the queen 
of (lowers at the third annual flower 
show which the department of horti- 
culture staged for the 8500 visitors 
who Hocked to French Hall last Sat- 
urday, Sunday and Monday. Satur- 
day at 2 l*. u. the doors were opened 
for entrance into the formal garden 
scheme with its pergolas, arches, and 
vine covered trellises. Against this 
garden background chrysanthemums 
of all kiuds, table decorations, and 
basket arrangements were set off to 
splendid advantage. From thestaud- 
of the true lover of flowers nothing 
could be better than the twelve mag- 
nificent white show chrysanthemums 
grown by Mr. Whiting, foreman of 
the M. A. C. greenhouses and ex- 
hibited with the silver cup which they 
won at the recent Northampton show. 
A great deal of interest was also 
shown in the student competition. 

Of the juniors who competed for 
prizes in table decoration, Frank A. 
Wo. m|* of Groton was awarded Ami 
prize of $■> with a table of Ophelia 
roses and maidenhair ferns. The 
second prize of $l\ went to Lewis II. 
Lawrence of Falmouth, with a yellow 
and white combination of lamvardias 
and alamander, while third, a sub- 
scription to a trade paper, whs 
awarded to Miss Adaline Ferris of 
Ridgefield Park. N. J., who used 
yellow single chrysanthemums with 
asparagus spreugeri. Special men- 
tion was given to Roger F. Clapp of 
•Salem, with an arrangement of pink 
l>egonias, gardenias and variegated 
hibiscus, and George J. OuncHii of 
Arlington, with bronze chrysanthe- 
mums of the variety "Prexy," which 
was originated here. 

In the basket arrangements of 
large chrysanthemums exhibited by 
the senior class, John ('. Campbell 
of Gardner was given first prize of 
?:'.. using a yellow color scheme. 
Harry C. Lydiard of Hartford, 
Conn., won second prize of 12 with 
Roman gold chrysanthemums and 
smilax, while the third award went 
to Harold A. Pratt of Shrewsbury, 
who bad yellow flowers arranged 
with oak leaves, Campbell also won 
first in the class of small chrysanthc 






f 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



3 



mums, using bronze floweiB in Jap- 
anese effect. Milford R. Lawrence 
of Falmouth took second with yellow 
singles, and Andrew N. Schwab of 
Yalesville, Conn., third with mixed 
single dowers. 

The judges were Mr. R. S. Carey 
of South Hadiey and Mr. I). J. Galli- 
van and Mr. G. H. Sinclair of Hol- 
yoke. 

In the commercial classes, of which 
there were a number, R. 8. Carey, G. 
H. Sinclair, D. J. Gallivan, Butler 
and Ullman. aud E. J. Canning 
received prizes. Special mentions 
were given to Mr. Richards of Green- 
field for his display of carnations, E. 
D. Smith and Co. of Adrian, Mich, 
for a collection of show chrysanthe- 
mums, and George Mclntyre of Kast- 
hampton for a collection of pompon 
chrysanthemums. The commercial 
classes were judged l>y K. S. Dullil. 
J. T. Dizer, \V. I. Cross, C. R. Wil- 
ber, H. C. Lydiard, and H. S. Saidel 
of the senior class. 

A large vase of chrysanthemums 
shown through the courtesy of Henry 
M. Robinson of Boston also attracted 
attention. These blooms were ship- 
ped from San Francisco Oct. 25 and 
then from Boston to Amherst cover- 
ing in all about 8600 miles. 

One room was devoted to the land- 
scape gardening department and here 
were shown landscape gardening 
photographs, student designs and 
Civic Improvement Extension work. 

Music by the college orchestra Sun- 
day afternoon furnished added enter- 
tainment for the visitors. 



INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE 
MEETS WITH THE FACULTY 

Practical farm work, finances and 
entrance requirements were dis- 
cussed in a meeting of the investiga- 
tion committee with the heads of de- 
partments in the college on Friday, 
in Stotkbridge hall. 

The amount of credit to be given 
for practical agricultural work in 
entrance requirements and in the col- 
lege curricula was the main problem 
considered, and department heads 
were asked what practical work their 
departments were doing. 

Several alumni in the faculty 
stated that any lowering of the 
standard* of entrance examinations 
would be deplored by both the 
alumni and the students of the col- 



SOPHOMORES GET 6-3 WIN 

IN INTERCLASS CONTEST 

In a clean hard fought contest, the 
sophomores defeated the freshmen 
Saturday, on Alumni field, by a score 
of 6 to 3. Much had been ex- 
pected of the freshman team but the 
heavy sophomore line and their hard 
hitting backfleld were slightly super- 
ior to their -freshman rivals. The 
old Hue plunging type of play 
was used almost entirely throughout 
the game, although the freshmen 
made a few substantial gains by the 
over head route. 

The first score came in the second 
quarter, when Dewing kicked a 
pretty field goal from the 25-yard 
line, after his team had been held for 
downs. 

In the third quarter, after a series 
of successful rushes by Williams and 
Poole, the former weut over for the 
first touchdown. Newton failed to 
kick the goal. 

The open field running of Wil- 
liams, the line plunging of Poole, as 
well as the defensive work of Sedg- 
wick were the features of the soph- 
omore team, while the kicking of 
Dewing and the work of Gorwaiz at 
tackle featured for the freshman. 
The line-up : 

BOPHOMORBfl i isKSHMKS 

Oootey, le r«, Dewinn 

Effewtoa, M rt, ciKiiiiitTH 

Bex ton, 1« rR.McLead 

Bond, o «•• Hunker 

Tirrell, r« 1«, Keadio 

Cacti*,* It.Uorwala 

Maurell, re le, Oarlelon 

EteadlO, <|b qb, Vlgezzi 

I'oole, ltd. rhb, Gray 

Williaina, rhb lbb, Lent 

Setlgewiuk, fb lb, (.'amle 

Score— Sophomores H, Frenhmen 3. 
Substitutes — Fr.-slntirn : Bacon for 
<;..rwaise, Qalnejr lot Carleton, Mallon 
for Cande. Touchdown — Williams. 
Field goal— Dewing, tteterea C nap« 

man. Umpire— Buttrtck. Head lines- 
man — Huiitooii. Time — 12 minute 
quartern. 



DR. HUGHES SPEAKER AT 

FIRST SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Speaking at the first Sunday 
Chapel of the year Dr. Richard 
C. Hughes, Secretary for Univer- 
sity work of the Board of Edu- 
cation of the Presbyterian Church, 
Madison, Wisconsin, took for his 
text the following passage : "I 
chose you, and ordained you, that 
ye should go and bring forth fruit, 
and that your fruit should remain." 
To expand the thought in bis text he 
said in part: "A good definition of 
a successful life is such "a life that 
you would be willing to continue liv- 
ing as you are now living it. Many 
people have the idea that at the last 
moment of our life on this earth 
everything can be changed and the 
future will be all happiness, but this 
is not true for we will surely go on 
living just as we are at the present 
time." 

The business life of every man and 
woman is a sacred task of God, so 
we must follow His calling to our 
specific task, and do our best when 
we have the opportunity which is de- 
nied to so many. In other words, 
the thing that you can do best is the 
thing you can best do. Kvery 
man's big temptation comes at the 
point of his power, that is his own 
peculiar ability, and it is the little 
differences in each individual life 
that should make his own task 
clear to him. The great mass of 
people have no opportunity to make 
good, the way college men have, so 
the most important duty of the Col- 
lege is in social service work for the 
betterment of the world." 




Cox Sons & Vining 

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ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



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Special luncheon from 11-90 toS p. m. 

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6-30 a. m. to 11-30 p. m. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



To the Students 
of M. A. C. 

Announcing that if the boys want 

to have their shoes tapped 

with the best quality of 

leather, drop in 

and see 

J. GINSBURG 

n>2 Amity Street 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTKI. 



Suggestions were offered concern- 
ing the methods of obtaining a 
steady income for tie institution. 
The present uncertainty of appro- 
priations is a great disadvantage to 
the administration of the college. 
Under the present system, the order 
in which the needed buildings are to 
be erected is not within the control 
of the institution. 

There was also a general talk on 
the difficulty of determining what 
men are able to do college work, and 
whether the system of definite en- 
trance examinations Is the most 



I. P. A. DELEGATES 

It is quite probable that M. A. C, 
will be represented at a convention of 
the Intercollegiate Prohibition asso- 
ciation, to be held at Lexington, Ky., 
Dec. 28 to 81, if some definite con- 
clusion regarding expenses is reached. 
Through the influence of Mark Shaw 
of Boston, New England field sec- 
retary of the I. P. A., it is intended 
to start an organization, upon the 
knowledge obtained by the delegates, 
for the purpose of studying the eco- 
nomics of prohibition. 

SEED JUDGING TRYOX7T8 
The first tryout for the Aggie seed 
judging team »will be held in room 
801 Stockbridge hall, Wednesday, 
Nov. 15 at 3 i'. m. This is the first 
of a series of contests, which will be 
held during the fall in order to select 
the team of three men which will 
represent Aggie at the Inter-Collegi- 
ate Seed Judging contest, to be held 
in Springfield Jan. 8. Competition 
Is open to all New England colleges. 



ALUMNUS AT ASSEMBLY 
Mr. Henry H. White M. A. C '15. 
gave an interesting talk to the stu- 
dent body at assembly on his experi- 
ences enroute to and in Russia. Mr. 
White originally started for Turkey 
last spring as an agricultural mission- 
ary but was forced to return because 
of the war. His trip was one succes- 
sion of complications from start to 
finish, beginning with a hold up and 
search by a British cruiser; through 
the Scandinavian countries ; then 
three rigid Russian customs and 
police inspections to an uncertain 
arrival in Petrograd. While here, 
the Russian army of the east retreated, 
resulting in the Armenian massacres. 
Since these, the people among whom 
he was going, were now dead or scat- 
tered and the college burned, there 
was nothing left but to return after a 
short and interesting tour of southern 
Russia. 

CHAPMAN ELECTED MANAGER 

John A. Chapman '18 of Salem was 
elected manager of varsity foothall 
for the coming year at Assemhy on 
Wednesday. Chapman has been 
assistant varsity manager this season. 
Besides his work for the managership 
Chapman is a member of the Senate, 
and la serving on the prom and in- 
formal committees. He is a member 
of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 




DOUBLE SERVICE 
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V. S. aovernmeirt and Maropean War t»r» 
Oorootirati»lLmltodtoaeejtf4na«ao««; 
for a abort lima wsoffertho foUowlr- 
»pecl*lprioeaaa an Introductory 



speaa War aarrtej- 

ssssr* 




All ether a1«sa not Inetndad In 
■ i furnished. Hon-*kida atlO* 
'a/mont wlU» orders at 



_<aS*i — 
or mora Ore*. 



£% 



baoonvlnc** of tb#lr T«r 
bJaH qnaUUea. SolddJjeo* 
to t*i*> eon»um*fODly. 




AGGIE HARRIERS OUTRUN 
BY FAST WILLIAMS TEAM 



Handicapped by Lose of Five Varsity 

Man. Lyons Places Fourth for 

M. A. C. Score 17-40. 

Weakened by the loss of five strong 
men, the M. A. C. cross-country team 
went down to a defeat of 1 7-40 before 
a strong Williams squad Saturday at 
Williamstown. The course was twice 
around a two and one-half mile cir- 
cuit, beginning in front of the La- 
Salle gymnasium aud finishing at 
Weston Field during the Williams-M. 
A. C. football game. Lyons ran a 
good race but could not recover the 
lead gained by Brown and Putnam, 
the Purple's crack runners. Before 
the finish Kelton drew up and 
passed Lyons who held fourth place 
to the end. The race for firt>t place 
was close between Brown and Putnam 
hut at the final sprint the former pul- 
led awa\ and finished an easy first. 

Order of finish : 1, Brown. W. ; 2. 
Putnam, W. ; 3. Kelton, W ; 4. Lyons, 
11. A. C. ; ."», NalTonl, W. : 8, Leem- 
ing, W. ; 7, Gordon, II. A. C. ; 8, 
Chapin, M. A. C. ; !», Sweeney. M. 
A. C. Time, 27 min . 8 I -."> sec. 
Length, 5 miles. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At a regular meeting <>f the St«><k- 
hridge club held Vfedneedaj evening 
Nov. M, Prof. ,]. C. McNtttt. major 
adviser in animal husbaudi y who 
is responsible for the national promi- 
nence of the stock judging teams, 
gave a general talk on his personal 
experiences and intimate acquaint- 
unces with several of the agricultural 
■■•lieges of the country. Mis remarks 
which were exceedingly interesting 
and instructive, were largely devoted 
to cattle, dairying ami agricultural 
conditions especially in North Caro- 
lina. It wan gratifying to gathir 
from the lecture that Massachusetts 
is among the leaders, gaining a na- 
tional reputation through individu- 
ality and perseverance. At this 
time several new members were 
voted in. 



DISCUSS FLOWER SHOW 

A general discussion concerning 
the annual Sower show and the policy 
of the coming year was the main 
topic of a meeting of the Florist's 
and Gardner's club Thursday even- 
ing Nov. 9. In order to increase the 
practical value of the club, an 
attempt is to be made to arrange a 
- iiedule for the year of speakers on 
florieuHttTsJ subjects in all their 
bianches. Plans were matured for 
the entertainment of the Northamp- 
ton Florist's and Gardner's associa- 
tion who visited the show Monday 
afternoon and who have shown the 
greatest of interest in, and co-opera- 
tion with this department. A general 
«>!»ltine for the winter promises to 
increase the prominence of this 
activity,! 



TO PLAY CORNELL 

Varsity Leaves For Ithaca Thurs- 
day. New York Team Has 
Good Record. 

Thursday night the varsity leaves 
for Cornell by way of Springfield 
where they stay over night. The 
squad takes au early morning train 
to Ithaca, arriviug there between 9 
and 10 a. m. Friday afternoon will 
be given over to light practice on 
Cornell Field. The team is in good 
shape, although Boles aud F. Gray- 
son are suffering from minor in- 
juries. Practice in throwing for 
wards and in punting is the order of 
the week, with light scrimmage and 
signd practice. Cornell has had a 
fairly successful season thus far, de- 
feating Gettysburg 26-0, Williams 
42-0, Bucknell 19-0, Carnegie Tech. 
l/i-7, and Michigan 2;5-20 1 and be- 
ing defeated by Harvard 23-0. Cor- 
nell has quite an injured list at pres- 
ent and was forced to srhstitute 
many times in the last two games. 
The team looks forward to a close, 
hard struggle. The probable line-up 
follows : 



M. 4. < . 

K. (iravaon, (eap( .) le 

IIiiIiiio, ll 
S|i;iillilinii, It; 
Wniierls. e 
Dunn, m 

Edwards, if . 

I»av. re 



< OKNKI.I.. 

re, Eekley 

rt, Dixon 

in, Anderson 

B| Carey 

lg, Mi lies 
It, Gillies 
le, Zander 



Whittle, P.Grayson, <|l>, qb, Sblvertck 
food, Ihh rhb, Kpeed 

liidis, Moyiiihau rhb, lbb, Benedict 
Weeks, lit*. fl>. Mueller, (rapt. » 



TEAM TO SEND SIX MEN 

TO N. E .INTERCOLLEGIATES 

The cross-country team winds up 
the season's schedule when it lines up 
for the annual New Kngland luler- 
collegiate cross-country rnn at Frank- 
lin Park Saturday at eleven o'clock 
The loss of last year's strong com- 
bination has necessitated the building 
of an entirely new team with Lyons 
as h niH'leus. Howevei. the other 
colleges have suffered equally for 
Brown of M. I. T.. Bell of Maine, 
and Tucker of Dartmouth last year's 
winning men, have been lost. The 
loss of Carpenter through ineligibility 
is ureprable but with the team in 
good condition and a creditable sea- 
son's work behind them, Manager 
Flint is confident of at least equalling 
if not bettering Aggie's fifth place of 
last year. The team that goes down 
Friday will be Captain Lyons, Bell, 
Bainbridgr, Gordon, Chapin and 
Sweenev. 



PLANS TO JUDGE IK CHI0AOO 

The stock judging team will go to 
Chicago to compete at the Interna- 
tional Breeders* show if the inten- 
tions of Professor McNuttof the ani- 
mal husbandry department are 
carried out. The show takes place 
the<1atter part of this month. Beef 
cattle, horses, sheep and swine are 
the classes of stock to he judged. 
The fine record of the team in judging 
dairy cattle at Springfield may be 
duplicated in this contest. 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college men, from $1.50 to $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Cba.sc of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 l '|'- 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Ready-to-wear Clothes for young men from Atterbury Systent-Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Made-to-your-mcasure Clothes, from $25.00 l 'P- 

Mr. Campion personally superintends to tilting in 
this department and is an expert in the business, 

One of the Best Custom Tailoring Departments in the State 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS 6L0VES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always tf« a< ' to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



F° f 



R forty yean we have rwwfcwd faithful service. For forty 

year* we have tried lo make each yeai'i tervke more iwarly 

ideal. Thb untiring effort h.ii Imilt for ui not only The WotW* 

Largest Mail Oder Seed Buuneii, but aim a World Wide 

reputation for Efftdeacy and uaduputed leaderihif.. The 

Fortieth Annwsiary Edition ol Burpee* Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" ■ brighter and 

better than ever. It i» mailed free. A porteard wUI bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Buildlnga Philadelphia 



F*«u:^*« S*lmo© Store 

Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 
Bxpert Kt»t3olt*lriK~B*?» t lentlier n*»c« I 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



1 












The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O. LANl'HKAR '18. M'tflng Editor 
MILFORH R. LAWRENCE *17. Assistant Editor 
WILLIAM BAV1M.E. JR. ML Alumni Editor 



A.MOCIATK EDITOBS. 

JOHN T. MIZKK '17 

JOSEPH F. WHITNEY 17 
FRANK J. BINKSMK 

NATHAN W. OIIXETTK 18 
EDWARD N. M1T< HKI.I. '18 
EI.IOT M. BUFFO M '19 

MYRTON F. EVANS M9 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER '17. BusineM Manager 
JAME8 C POWELL IS, 

Assistant liusmess Manager 

BIRGER R. ROSEULIST 'l«. 

Advertising Manager 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, H cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered u •econd-claas matter at the A inherit 
Poet Office. 



Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Nov. 14. No. 7 



That the presence in the student 
body of an increasingly large number 
of coed* would result in a gradual 
toning down of certain wild propensi- 
ties in the men of the college has been 
the dream of idealists for years. 
How far there is still to go before the 
ideal is reached was well illustrated 
by the well meaning though inconsid- 
erate outburst of politicaKand other, 
enthusiasm at the dorms Wednesday 
night. When happy-go-lucky fun 
goes wrong it is time some one called 
a halt. We feel sure that the c< ieds 
would appreciate a reasonable con- 
sideration in this regard, and possi- 
bly some of the occupants of the dor- 
mitories would be grateful for more 
silence and less noise in the future. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

INotlcee for thii column ihould be dropped In 
at the ( oi.i.K.niAN office or handed to Nathan 
W. Gillette *1« on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each Issue,] 

\\'hiivi:si> v v, Nov. 1"» 

2-10 i'. M- Assembly. 1'hi Kappa 1'hi 
Address. President L. II. 
Murlin, Huston University. 

7-00 I". M. — Mandolin Club Uehei(is;il, 

Social Union. 
7-00 p, it.— Agricultural Economic* 
Club. Social Union. 

Till USKAY NOV. Id 

0-45 r. m.- Y. M. <'. A. informal talk. 
Social Union. 

7-00 p. u.— Glee club rehearsal, Old 
Chapel. 

7-00 p. M.— Inter-Fraternity Confer- 
ence. Trophy Boom. 

Friday*, Nov. 17. 

0-46 i\ m.— Motion Pictures, Stock- 
bridge Hall. 
B ITl itn.-vv, Nov. 1M 

11-00 \. If. Intercollegiate Cross-Conn- 
try, Franklin Field l)oi Ches- 
ter. 

8-80 p. m.— Vanity football, M. a. c. 

vs. Cornell at Ithaca. 
:i-:lO p. m.— Sophomore-Freshman rope 
pull. 

Si now. Nov. 10 

0-10 v. M.— Sunday chapel, Uev. ( . T. 
Hawkins. Pastor Central Con- 
gregational Church Jamaica 

Plain. 



notice gets stale, pull it down. Our 
bulletins should be alive always. 

Billy Sunday's campaign has hit 
the campus ! The singing of one of 
the Rhodeaver hymns eclipsed all 
other sounds in South college Mon- 
pay night. An extension of the 
revival spirit to North college met a 
leather welcome. 

Mr. W. DuBois, representative of 
tin: Thompson Illustrograph Co., of 
Puiitfhkeepsie, N. Y., was about the 
campus recently taking panoramic 
views of the college buildings. Mon- 
thly after chapel he photographed 
the entire Btudent body in front of 
Stotkbridge Hall. This firm was in 
charge of the photography at the 
Plattsburg Training Camp last sum- 
mer. 



"BIDE-A-WEE 



»» 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other good il.ings U< < • 

MKS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. 41S-W 

CJNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKOIJI.AK *PND%V -KKVICK AT 1 V. w 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Ti KSIJ \ v . Nov. 21 . 

7-00 i\ M. -Clee Club rehearsal, Old 
Chapel. 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

Tennis Championship Clean Sweep 
for 1910 

Owing to an accident, the final 
double match between N. K. Spauld- 
ing and W. K. Smith '19 vs. Newell 
aud Dixon '20 in the interclass match 
between the sophomores and fresh- 
men was withdrawn. Dixon suffered 
an injury to his eye by a volleyed 
ball after the sophomore team had 
won the first game n-:i. The match 
was forfeited to 1919, thus giving 
the title of championship in the inte - 
class tournament to the sophomores. 



Northampton 



FIRST INFORMAL A SUCCESS 

Kighty couples were entertained at 
the first informal of the season, Sat- 
urday, Nov. 11. It came at an 
auspicious time, after the removal of 
the quarantine from Mt. Holyoke and 
Smith colleges, and the drill hall was 
well filled withdaucers. Many of the 
"informalites" watched the first half 
of the closely-fought fteshman-soph- 
omore game, before beginning the 
dance. The music, which was fur- 
nished by Bos worth's orchestra of 
Northampton, was exceptionally 

good. 

The chaperones from Smith Col- 
lege were Mrs. 1 mug Maiier and Mrs. 
George A. Underwood; from Mt. 
Holyoke College, Miss Wheeler. 
Mrs. Butterfield and Mrs. Hicks were 
the M. A. C. chaperones. 

MOVIES FRIDAY NIGHT 
Another good program of motion 
pictures has been planned for this 
Friday night by the Social Union. 
Ten reels of live Triangle films will 
b« thown. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Two parties of M. A. C. men 
went to the Williams game by auto- 
mobile Saturday. 

Men desiring work for week-ends 
should see Mr. Watts, as there is 
plenty of it to be done. 

"Goe"~P1aisted '16, was on cam- 
pus Wednesday, Nov. X. and looked 
over the football squad. 

The Senate has put a ban on the 
custom of riding bicycles on the 
campus walks. Think of the other 
fellow, you who travel on wheels. 

Four new ollices have been evolved 
out of room G, South college, by the 
use of wall-board and carpentry. 
The outside door of the room opens 
into a corridor from which all the 
rooms may be reached. 

The first appearance of the Bay 
State Uuralist is expected in the 
Springfield Sunday Union of Nov. 
26. This is the feature page of agri- 
cultural matter written by the stu- 
dents in journalism in the college. 

Besides the use of the white 
washed football the football team haB 
had the use of six large search lights 
to practice by this week. This en- 
able! the team to work out until a 
much later hour than with merely a 
white ball. 

Speaking of the tariff, we wonder 
why a college community cannot re- 
spect signs and notices on the bulle- 
tin boardB without protecting them 
with a glass cover. Also when your 



PRATT CAPTAIN OF TRACK 

Harold A. Pratt M7, of Shrews- 
bury has been elected captain of this 
year's track team thus filling the va- 
cancy caused through the resignation 
of Capt. J. Dixon Birchard who has 
left college. Pratt has been running 
for three years on the varsity relay 
team where his work has been most 
conBpicious, entitling him to his track 
letter. He is a member of the Lam- 
bda Chi Alpha fraternity. 

UNDERCLASS ROPE PULL 

Freshman six-man rope pull will be 
held Saturday, at 2-.S0 i*. m., on the 
old athletic field. The managers of 
the sophomore and freshman teams 
are R. F. Readio and 1). H. Smith, 
respectively. The sophomore team 
will probably be selected from Castle, 
Newton, Tirrell, Sexton, Ross. Ken- 
nedy and Poole : while the following 
men are candidates for the freshmen : 
Crawford, Delehant. Roi>erts, Mc- 
George, Hersom, Hurd, Sullivan, 
Bridge, Blanchard, Holland, Stiles, 
and Lambert. 



FLOWERS AND PlAhTS 

Orown by the Florlcultural Dtpt. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

QHOWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



BY REQUEST 

We have taken the agency for 

St. Clair's 
Chocolates 

Boston Providence 

Buy them before you leave. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



ELECT AGGIE ALUMNI 

M. A. C. will have at least two 
ardent supporters in the next Gen- 
eral Court of Massachusetts as the 
result of last Tuesday's balloting. 
John B. Hull 'fl was re-elected to 
the Senate from Great Barrington 
without opposition, and Park W. 
Allen '11 of Westfteld will represent 
that town in the House. 



INDISPUTABLE PROOF OF 

THE BETTER QUALITY OF 

DE LAVAL SEPARATED CREAM 



The must iwpfertikr.lt of (ill l)Utter*|iirf[itf 
contttttl are Hume that take iilw'e at •h* 
National «'«n%entlm» of thf National B»B« 
makers* AMor|atl<in, held In roeotll \, a* in 
niniumtlon with Hie National DniuStm*. 
The li rut |ime winners at svorf « 'uinriitii.n 
of the A»»«ni»tlmi rtm-e its onfatllWIttnn in 
1m« have all been I>e i.«\ a I men. 

Sm-h i-viflence of the superior uii.tltt) if 
. n tin pr.i.lm ed bj tbfl He l,;niil ( "renin :*eps 
rator no row twM *■•* 
siileriim the (rt)fi'll 
a i-reaiH nf|«ii;iti 
afford to OfVfftWk. 

To proflm c-!ii,rH.n-' ,! " 
butter yon most h«*e» 
tine qualftj of < 
and 16 jjet tb* h** 1 
i ream jrmi mnM MM* • 
He I_iv.il ( mini 
tor 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




IiWi lltiinmv(\ 
NKW YOKK 



WK, itw»! 
CttM M 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14 t 1916. 



RIFLE TEAM IN NEED OF 

SEVERAL GOOD SHOOTERS 

Captain Canlett nrges that all men 
who have had any experience in 
hooting should report as soon as 
ossible for trvouts for the rifle teats. 
! |i to date the men have been back- 
haul in reporting. The team lost 

several good shots by graduation last 

.lime and that leaves quite a hole to 
i. filled. Aggie has ulwavs stood 
among the leaders and has won four 
outdoor and three indoor intercolle- 
giate rifle championship. 

Rules governing the .sophoiuoie- 
ffeabmao indoor ritle match are as 
follows : 

1 . There shall be one annual offic- 
ial freshman-sophomore indoor ritle 
contest, to be shot before the com- 
mencement of the Thanksgiving holi- 
day. 

.'. The match shall be shot in one 
which day shall be fixed liv cap- 
tain of Ihc varsity team ami the fresh* 
man ami sophomore manager after 
consultation with the coach of the 
ritle team. 

.".. One team will shoot in the 
morning and one in the afternoon ; 
tht'ie will bo no mixing of teams in 
the gallery during the shooting. 

1. l-.ach class shall enter one 
team, to consist off ten men ; the 
Mines of the highest five from each 
itam will be counted as the official 
-cues. 

#, Kach man will shoot one string 
of ten shots, prone, on a regulation, 
one half inch bull's eye target; two 
shuts to the bull's eye will be the 
maximum limit. 

I. The regulation Springfield snb- 
talilde rifles will he used : each ritle 
will be sighted up to the satisfaction 
of the contestant to use it. 

7. No man shall shoot in this 
match who has shot in any official 
intercollegiate match. Of who is not a 
regular member of the freshman or 
Hophomore class. 

8, The five highest men on the 
winning team, provided they make a 

score or over, and the manager 
of the winning team, are eligible for 
their class numerals. 

I, The coach of the rifle team 
ami the captain of the varsity team 
shall be the final judges on targets. 



SPEAKERS FOR THE WEEK 



1916 NOTES 



eeiveil his 
and his 1) 



Sunday Chapel. rj e nt. E. g. Richards has been 
The speaker in next Sunday chapel assigned to the First t'agayan coin- 
will be the Reverend (\ J. Hawkins, pany at Tuguegaraa, Northern Luzon, 
pastor of the Central Congregational Phillipine Islands. "Ted" earned 
church, Jamaica Plain. He W as born this assignment through his ability to 
in Yacaville, California. Kept. :;. I87fi talk Spanish and will feel quite at 
and lived in California until he re- home there as the valley of the Ca- 
ceived his A U. from the University gayan river is a big tobacco section. 

of the Pacific in lKiK't. He also re- v • a j * 

ne jibo le- Francis Andrews writes from San 

\. M. fion, there in 1SI01 A( . ado< Colo , ag per thus : -PJIf, 

In 1898 he has a reunion here about three times 

was ordained to the ComrraffAtinnal „ i »r>i_ », . . 

viniKiegaiion.il a week. Those present are 'Nubs 

ministry anil hesan his career of m . t i i \* ■ 

»" H '" «--«ieer «r t Hlanpieil and myself. I 

minister us associate pastor in the l, 
Humphrey street church. New Haven, 8ur 
Connecticut, in the same year. He 
is the author of many nooks 

which are • "The Mind c 

Andy says that San Aeacio is a town 

of 150 to 200 souls, so that letters 

addressed to that town will reach 



came out 

the middle of September, ami 

'Nubs' is working 

at the Cordillera ranch, while I am a 

unong j m j| e south of him on another ranch" 

n 



THE 



United States Hotel 

B— e h, Lincoln mid Klnmititn St» , 
BOSTON, r\ASS. 



only l»ti til... k» from South Iri inlnitl Hlit 
linn, anil WHrtl] n-Hi-hed from Nurlli Stutlmt 
!«F KlevMifd Hallway, Mini i i.iivrnli-iit alike 
tii the great retatltiihii|iMunit iintim-** n-nt ,,-. 
alau to the theaUcK anil place* of Inlerent. 

European Plan $1,00 par Day 
and Upwards 

Table anil ser\ ire iiiihiii paHHi'il. 
Ili.i.kli-i ami mail Mill o |>< in li liptliii t loll . 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



ie Mind of Whitttei 
ami --Will the Home Survive?" 
Wednesday Assembly. 



Dr Samuel .1. Kldcr. IWon, of him and Nubs o. k 
the League to Kuforce Peace, will 
address the assembly on Wedneadav, 
Nov ti Dr. Kid 



Kek Laiid and Clint Goodwin, our 
ijzile dancers, have found lodging at 
er, a prominent 719 Asylum Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
Boston lawyer, was one of the eoun- Kek is teaching botany in the Hart- 
lets for the Cited States in arbitra- f nnl b5gb Brhm>1 aml (1il|t is working 
Hon with deal Britain about the at 3(, l'earl St. with T. II. Desmond. 



BtheHeS claims. He has been fore- 
most in peace activities. Without 
doubt his message to Aggie men will 
be one that will interest all. 



Y. M. C. A. HOLDS DISCUSSION 
Tim V. |f, C. A. held the second 
of its iliscussional talks Thursday 
evening, Nov. !*. 1916, about the 
fire place of the Social Union. The 
subject, "Has Christianity failed, in 



landscape architect. 

Haymond A. Cushing is represent- 
ing C. 1). Parker & Co.. Inc., hank- 
ers, 7« Devonshire St., Moston. 

Cupid Mahan is growing fruit on 
Nice farm, Ilrattlehoro, Vt.. when he 
wrote to Stan Hall recently he had 
••three 'wimmiu* " helping him in the 
orchard. "Lots of fun watching 
them climb trees," Mr. Mahan says. 

"Red," ••Cueball" mid Homer Dar- 

Mal 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work .speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 

\iiinl» fin |; 

P. vt. CURRAN 



Fountain Pens 

<M T> lH'miltHi 

C.JF. DYFR 



the light of the present world situa 

lion?" evoked many interesting dis- ling are at 101 1 Fidelity Bldg 

missions ami brought up many phases timore, Md., care of the liowker In- 

of the question. In conjunction with secticide company. "Red" is selling 

this, the idea was advanced that the ••I'yrox" and his territory includes 

average church 'if today should not all but two counties in Maryland plus 

lie taken as a standard by which to I wo counties in Delaware 



judge whether or not ' Inistianity has 
failed. At some future meeting op- 
portunity will lie given for the ex- 
pression of idea* as to whether the 
church ami its Hilherents are living 
up to the principles set forth by 



Duke Curran and Kddie King are 
joint managers of Oak Tree farm, 
WaljMile. 

Revised returns from Justin Hem- 
enway, Boston ! "I have successfully 
passed the examinations and been 



Christ. The neM of these series of a ,. f . eple(J for Pn |i„tment in the United 
informal talks will be held Thurs- states Marine ( 



day evening M 6-43 in the Social 

I nion. The topic, which is of par- 
ticular interest to college men, will 
be; "Are church goers hyj>o- 
erite*?'* 



FLORISTS MEET 

Tuesday evening the Florists and 

Gardener*! club of the college joined 

in a fiieeting with the club of Holyoke 

and Northampton florists and gard- 

ttn to discuss various features of 

tin- two flower shows recently held 

I" Niiulmrapton and Amherst. The 

Mgw explained in detail theit rea- 

awarding prizes as they did 

iiiii iii ought out many technical 

plats of interest to the students, 

Bwitj the meeting Professor Nehrl- 

to| li- -ad of the floriculture depart* 

tnei.' wta presented with I beautiful 

present, a cut glass dish, by 

• is of the Holyoke and 

npton Florists ami (Jurdeti- 

*rs'C'l*ib, 



EARLY TRACK PRACTICE 

Through the shortening of Christ- 
mas holidays by a week, indoor 
track work will start earlier this year 
than ever before. In past years 
actual activity has not started until 
after New Year's, and consequently 
the relay team has been greatly 



e i orps and am leaving 
for Port Uoyal. South Carolina, where 
I expect to be stationed for the next 
three months. Address me at Marine 
Harricks, Port Royal, S.C.— "Hero." 

Miss Esther Chase is teaching 
French and three classes in mathe- 
matics at the high school in Gorhsni, 
% H. Address Box 276. 

"8i" Little spent the week end on 
the campus. 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

Ritas ANI> CARPETS 

K, li MAHHIl K--I v I l 



Ka-r*ai.iaaan i Mi«a 

8TBPHKM Lank FoX.tt»«, f B <. 

M * Ml ► *<"l I KINII .IKVVKIKKv 

I Mo Iiivoaiiwav. NKW VOKK 

Ct^iril AND CXlM-iKfJlC 

IMNK AND MINUS •« 



• •■•i o •• 1 1 v ■ f >t *»n 



■ tW.-V**. V. «.,«,_ 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



DR. RUPRECHT RESIGNS 
Dr. R. W. Ruprecht, for several 



handicapped at the first meet bv a years connected with the Experiment 
lack of definite practice. H»,t now, Station as research chemist, has ae- 
«i,ha week longer in which to be- cepted an attractive jmsition with the 
eo,„e started, a more uniform combHF- W. Tunnell Company of Philadel- 

j ,,u -,...... »i. . ohi.'t- manufacturers of fertilisers 

nation is bound to result, greatly ; F""«' 

,.,.». * , ,„« ! and glue. Dr. Ruprecht will install 

brightening the prospects of s sue- "»" » , . , 

*.. . i i and operate a chemical laboratory 

cessful schedule, * . T i • u. # .u* 

, .^^^^ m and have general over sight of the 

The M. A. C. club of New York rnanufactnrimg plant. He will prob- 

dinner Nov. II will be reported in sbiy sever his connection with the 

iheCornii.ivN next week. Kxperiment SUlion Dec. 1. 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

No* lucated over port office. I ' p inn Sight 

Pressing ail Cleaning i Specl.H? 

I .iharal Ticket S»»t»m l>|. \(, m 

College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

2'jyg7 High St. 



SELL 



Hart Schaffner & 

Marx Clothes 

Come down tc) Holyoke and see ow 
big store. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. B ' ok * n lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DKNTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass, 

offii-e Hours- 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-80 to f> p, hi. 



PRESIDENT BTJTTERFIELD 

IN WASHINGTON, D. C. 

President Butterfield is now in 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. Washington, d.c m attending the an. 

1 Dual meeting of the Association of 
Agricultural Colleges and Experi- 
ment Stations. On his way to the 
capital he gave the principal address 
at the banquet of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Club of New 
York, of which Daniel Willard '82, 
president of the Baltimore & Ohio 
railroad, is president. On Thursday 
he will speak at the banquet of the 
Washington alumui held at the Hotel 
Kbbitt in that city. 



Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Gan. \sbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill ^upnlie,. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and hngme 
Connections. Holyoke, Mm. 



BECKMAN'S 



The Highland Hote 

Comer of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan It ;» just ^ s tep 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Us room* are well furnished and comfortable, 
havinir a telephone and hot and cold running 
»at« in every room. Prices •! and up: rooms 
with bath (single) sjl.50 and up. 

Itse*cellsnt cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant »"«'" or y.-^ v ! r n y , 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



Candies and Ice Cream 



•• HAMF W 



evening 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Highland Hotel. 



S|>ringAH<l, Mmb. 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

HKNUY K. WHITE 



M M uv Stkkbi. 



NOHTHAMITON 



Mandolin*. Genuine Hawaiian Ikuleles. 1'irks, 
Wrings, etc. and music for all instruments and 
■II ,nlc«. Instruments mar be had «n trial. 



Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the time to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletin. 

Johnson Book Co. 

Bahhitt Woodwortii 

Alpha Sigma l'lii 1 1. .use. 



SOMERVILLE MEN ORGANIZE 
At a meeting of the Somerville 
Club, held in Flint loboratory last 
Wednesday night, the following offi- 
cers were elected: President, Wil- 
liam W. Thayer; secretaiv-treasurer, 
Myrton F.Evans. The club decided 
to "push" tlie Aggie Musical Club 
concert which is to be held at Somer- 
ville High Dec. 28. They are in- 
tending to arrange for patronesses 
and to see that the concert is well 
advertised. 



TO INTRODUCE "TOUCHDOWN" 

''Touchdown, "the new college foot- 
ball song will be introduced to the stu- 
dent body Friday evening at the 
movies in Stockbridge Hall by the 
glee club. Copies will probably gc 
on sale at this time. 



CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 

The past week has seen great ac- 
tivity by the grounds department in 
putting on the finishing touches of 
campus scenery. The east alope of 
the ravine between the chemistry 
building and Flint laboratory has 
been set out with shrubbery and 
covered for the winter, while the 
remainder of the planting will he 
continued in the spring. The apace 
left by the removal of the fountain 
in front of the physics building has 
been leveled and sodded. Two park- 
ing spaces for automobiles on East 
campus have been finished, one in 
front of Wilder hall and the other 
opposite the entomology building. 

CATHOLIC CLUB ELECTS 
Thursday evening the M. A. C. 
Catholic Club held its initial meetiug 
of the year in Stockbridge Hall. 
Officers and an executive committee 
were elected as follows : President, 
James H. Day '17 of Hatfield ; vice- 
president, Arthur V. Petit'18of Am- 
herst ; secretary, Arthur M. McCarthy 
'19 of Mouson; treasurer, Leo C. 
Higgius '18 of Amesbury ; sergeant- 
at-arms, Harold L. Sullivan '18 of 
Lawrence. Executive committee : 
James J. Warren *17of North Brook- 
field, William A. Foley '18 of Palmer, 
and John E. Callanan '19 of Dorches- 
ter. 



MA— Dan Lewis is managing 
farm at Buzzards Bay. 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *ND POULTRY DRESSERS 

« llol.KS \I.K OM.Y 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, 
sages. Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



BOSTON, 



Bla«kM..m.. North and N»rlh < enlre Ml.eU. 

JTASS. 



AGGIE MEN 

Get your suits cleaned and pressed 
by an Aggie Man 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 

Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local A ** 0t v ,or pR|CF c0 LAMM co., BROWNINO, KINtl & CO., 

Custom Tailors 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKET SAVKS YOU 5 % 



at 



The Tailor Shop back of the 




Open for business afternoons and 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Btogden Sts., Boston, Mass 
Headquarter* for College Men when in the city. 

JOHN HOWARD LACY 



evenings. 



C&rptrvler St Morehoust 

PRINTERS, 



LARRY GAY, PROP 



Ho, i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

A new device for charging storage 
batteries has been added to the equip- 
ment of the physics department 
recently. It is the Waguer Rectifier 
made by the Wagner Electrical Com- 
pany, St. Louis, and is a cheap device 
for charging storage cells from com- 
mercial alternating current circuits 
without the use of the more expensive 
mercury arc rectifier, or direct cur- 
rent dynamo or converter, which is an 
economical investment only in power 
plants and garages. In operation, a 
transformer reduces the line voltage 
to a suitable value. The low pres- 
sure side of the transformer is con- 
nected to two vibrating mechanisms 
so designed that the armatures 
vibrate in synchronism with the 
changes in flow of the alternating cur- 
rent ; that is at the rate of 120 alter- 
nations per second. By means of 
these vibrators there is admitted to 
the storage battery circuit the corre- 
sponding halves of each alternat- 
ing current wave, so the current flows 
through the batteries being charged 
always in the same direction. The 
advantages claimed for new device 
are four : initial low expense, mini- 
mum upkeep, simplicity in operation, 
and portability. It is proving indis- 
pensible to the uses of storage bat- 
teries either for ignition purposes, or 
for small lighting plants. 



1913 NOTES 

Win ford F. Adams announces his 
engagement to Miss Elizabeth Kim- 
ball of Mason, N. H. That-a-boy 
"Nubbie", address East Leverett, 
occupation, "prosperous farmer." 



1915 NOTES 

(iurduer Brooks is ill with an 
attack of appendicitis. 

Dolly Dole leaves bachelor life Nov. 

18. 

John Bennett is Assistant Com- 
putei in the Foie River shipyards. 

Ralph McLain has just returned 
with the militia from Texas, ami ex- 
pects appointment soon in the regular 
army. 

Ray Upton is connected with a com- 
mission bouse at Kaiieuil Hall. 

Ned Parker is a life insurance 
agent in Dorchester. 

Harry White addressed the student 
body at Assembly Nov. 8, bib subject 
being his experiences in Russia aud 
Turkey. 

Phil Whitmore is unusually busy in 
the tobacco business and reports a 
successful season in the production of 
this narcotic stimulus. 

Fred Hyde is convalescing after a 
long attack of typhoid fever. His 
present address is Benedictine Sana- 
torium, Kingston, N. Y. 

Stuart Vinal, Bill Doran, (iibby 
Perry aud Ralph McNeal are for the 
second year members of the scrub 
faculty at Aggie. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
*72, — The Bottom Medical and Sur- 
gical Journal, Nov. 9, publishes a 
highly appreciative article on the 
life work of the late Dr. John Clar- 
ence Cutter and in an editorial notes 
the success of the Cutter lectures on 
preventative medicine as founded 
under the terms of his will. 





New Times, 
New Things 

The old fertilizer 

formulas are giving 

way to the new. At 

every farmers* meeting 

one subject should be 

the fertilizer formula 
that will furnish a balanced ration to the crop and keep up the fertility 
of the soil To do this the fertilizer should contain M least as much 

POTASH 

as Phosphoric Acid. Our note book has condensed hen essential 
in farmers' meetings and plenrv of space to record the new things 
that you hear. Let us send one to vou before your Invitim- meets, 
A supply of these is furnished hv requr.i to rvcrv inrtiluU heWin -".-rotates. 
We will be glad to send a supply delivered fret- of charge to every In strtute, t .range 
or Farmers* Club Officer on request. It cnUiins no ■tfeeftsaaf matter. 

German Kail Works, Uku, 42 Broadway, New York 

__ ...... ** t n _ 1 B t J _ 



-Block 
Empire Bld« . 



N«w Orli-an., Wb.tBfT C*n»r«l B*nk BM«. 
San Franci«o, 25 California 31. 




JUST 

A 



TIP! 



This year it's Sheepskin-lined Coats that have a clear Held. 
Be sure you have yours before the "big" game; yon will look 
"right" in one ol these big roomy coats and you won't know what 
it is to be cold. 

We have the largest line of these coats in the state and all we 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that \\«- 
are able to oiler you. Ask the man who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School ana College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5- Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mast 



Main Office: 

1546 1548 Hroad way, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the beat skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over 55 Years 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO. 

5 1 Chambers St., New York City 

■^aaMa«a^^«a*a^.^.aw^^^^^...-^«w»WVW«W»..- ' •* " ■ ^*a 






; 






8 



Th. Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1916. 



NEW BOOK BY PROF. WAUGH 

Aggie men, faculty and alumui,are 
always busy and accomplishing some- 
thing as is shown by the publication 
of a new book by Professor Waugh, 
head of the division of horticulture. 
This book is entitled "The Agricul- 
tural College— A study in Organiza- 
tion ami Management and especially 
in Problems of Teaching," and is put 
out by Orange Judd Company of 
New York. It discusses purposes 
and idealB, organization, physical and 
financial problems, specialization in 
agriculture, course of study, methods 
of teaching, extension teaching, etc 
It is dedicated to George Thompsou 
Fairehild, former president of the 
Kansas Agricultural College. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College FOl]NTAIN PEn s 



Oilers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ot 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 



DORAN GOES TO N. H. STATE 
William Doran '15 who has been 
taking graduate work in botany since 
his graduation will leave shortly for 
New Hampshire where he will act as 
an assistant instructor in botany in the 
state college and assistant at the 
experiment station. 

WILLIAMS GAME 

1 Continued from pa«e ll 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select f 

OUR RULE 



1 1 'in. 



'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL" S DRUG STORE 



Shortly after the second half the 
Maroon team started a spectacular 
march down the field. A line plunge 
and a skin tackle play gained first 
down, a 10-yard gain through guard 
reaped another, two more plays 
and a third was gathered in. The 
advance was drawn up sharp by the 
descent of a 15-yard penalty. The 
team was taken aback, literally and 
figuratively, and following a loss was 
forced to kick. 

The rest of the game was loosely 
played, with the ball in M. A. C.'s 
possession most of the time. There 
were numerous fumbles, in one es- 
pecially the ball lived up to the title 
"elusive pigskin" when about six 
men tried to recover and missed. 
The seventh was an Aggie. 

The Bay State team gained a 
total of nine first downs to the 
Purple'* five. Penalties cut 12 
first downs to the final nine. Pond 
starred for M. A. C, while t liffoid 
and O'Brien shone for Williams. 
The line-up t 



Associate Alumni, llU4d- 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen ludex, 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Iuterclass Athletic Committee, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 

H. M. Gore, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

H. E. Bobbins, Manager 

L. T. Buckman, Piesident 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT 



R. L. Holden, Manager 
U. 1). Hawley, Manager 
( >. S. Flint, Manager 
M. R- Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams. Manager 
1). M. Lipshires, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Mauager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
1). O. Merrill, President 
J. H. Day, President 
L. T. Buckman, President 
M. J. McNamara, President 
(). G. Pratt, Secretary 



M. A. « . 

Gray son, le 

Holmes, ll 
Spankling. Ik 

Roberts, c 

UiKirenlM.thaui. ru 
Kd wards, rt 
Day, re 
Whittle, <• 
aCoynlbBii. rli 
Pond, lb 
Weeks, fb 



W 1 1. MAMS 

le, Brown 

ll, Clifford 

lg, Brewer 

6, Weleh 

rj{, Wright 

rt, Sawyer 

re, Bludgett 

f, Clifford 

rb. O'Brien 

Hi, McLean 

fb, f,ewis 



Thar* are SeTi-nOwd Karons why you ihould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. E. ELDER 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Msin St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunche s, Soda, Ic e Cream 

Chtml #*/* trmm t A. M *4 A. M 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mllea of Trackage -Jlodern 
Equipment— Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight mm! Ek- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Comoanv 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOU1E COLLEOE lor MOl- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AUOIH COL- 
LEOE at 7 nnd 37 mln. past the hour. 

Spaclal Car* at HmtBim Hat" 



mm * SUNDERLAND ST. W. CO 



rHK TK**«*a»Y S^S*'-*-* 1 * 

(I,.. K PraaalaB K-i«ma« 

qui. k..i Mrflw, B*»l Work. l..»«-*< ' r " 
All woik carefully done. Wotfc call' 
delivered. **«»* overcoats, »mt\- *•"" 
co«t§. Indies' fine lu.en MUta a M"*'*"; 
Teams will call e»er» da* at M A l 

vn. s*m»u». *''°f 

Hear Mask Br 1 *, Amhwat. r « ! Na Jf * 



Amherst 



Seore— M. A. 0. <>, Williams <», Time 
of periods — 10 minutes, Beferee — 
Bankart of Dartmouth, I'm pi re — 
Luebrintfof Princeton. Head lineman 
—Green of Harvard. Substitules- 
M. A. C. : F. (*raysou for Whittle. Iloles 
for Moynihan, Uoodwin for HigKJn- 
bolham. McUlunls for Holmes; Wil- 
liams: Kieser for Sawyer. Hslstead for 
Clifford. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. Hie uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Milan <A "Gold Medtl Uniform!. " 

14*4-1416 Chattnut St, Philadelphia, P.. 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High Grade College W&k 



I 1 -« 

A% per tioi 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 

DRY CLEAHIHG AHD PRESSlWu 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 §«ta ' 
Dry Clfsninf sad Pressing, *■ 

ah Wlti j»»rtle *t r««pM' 
l,rt there wW w«lv* promi* »««' Jl 



HiuoinaoTtt** *■■ * 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 21, 1916. 



HEAVY CORNELL TEAM 
GETS DECISION 37 TO 



Comparative Data on Saturday's Lineup 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Both Sides Handicapped by Muddy 

Condition of Field. Grayson 

Stars for Aggie. 



K. Graysou, le 
Holmes, It 
Spaulding, Ig 
Roberts, c 
Blanchard, rg 



Hagelstein, rt 
Day, re 
Whittle, qu 
F. Grayson, «|l» 
Pond, lhl> 
Boles, rli 1 1 
Moynihan. rhb 
Weeks, ft 

Average, 



Weight, 
It*. 

170 

176 
17/i 
184 
182 
174 
170 
184 
170 
l.'iH 
155 
182 
158 
n;o 

170 



Height. 

ft. in. 

5 11 

6 1 

<; 
.") 

6 
5 



10 



I 



171 



8 
9 
3 

8 

t 

10 

10 

6 

10 

11 
10 



SI'IMMiKIKI.n. 



Gayle, re 
Greiin, rt 
Stafford, rg 
Harvey, c 
Webber, lg 
Damkruger, rt 
Whetstone, le 
Sermon, qb 
Dresser, Ibb 
Drew, rhb 
Thome, fb 



Wt-iiilil. 

ItlM. 

191 

17.'. 
159 

I Co 
176 
174 

IK.". 

155 
168 

177 
172 



lii-miii 
It. In. 



ll 
ll 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 



1 
I 
9 

8 
'.) 
2 

•> 

.. 

9 

8 

It) 

9 



Average, 



1 7:; 



9 
176 



Playing in mud that prevented effi- 
cient work on the part of both trains, j Higginbothum, rg 
Aggie went down to defeat last Sat- ' Maginnis, rt 
urday before the heavy Cornell eleven, 
87 to 0. The Meld was heavy, and a 
few minutes after the game started 
men on both teams were plastered 
with mud. Cornell made 25 points 
in the first half with the lineup com- 
posed of regulars, and added 12 more 
points in the second half playing 
subs. The Maroon team played a 
lighting game but was unable to score 
because of the condition of the field 
and the fact that the opposing team 
averaged many pounds heavier. Cap- 
tain Grayson was the star for Aggie, 
being able to get through the liue 
and tackle from the rear on several 
occasions. Several times whan M. 
A. C.'s goal was threatened the line 

bald like a wall, and it was only on j "The Arrival of Kitty," a three act 
account of Cornell's speed v quarter- farce which has had a successful run the Williams college cross-country 

back that thev were able to score. \ot two years in New York, has been J team won the New Kngland intercol- 
Npeed, Cornell's quarterback, mads selected for the Junioi Prom show by legiatt? eross-eouutry run at Franklin 

most of the gains, getting four out of manager Williams of the Roister ( Park Saturday, defeating Maine, 

the iix touchdowns and kicking the Doister Dramatic Association. The ! the favorite, by a score of 53 U> 56. 

fgoal. Captain Mueller opened play is a rollicking comedy, full of fun, j Dartmouth secured third place with 

scoring in the first period when with perplexing and amusing circum- M points, followed by M. I. T. with 

grabbed a wide forward pass and stances. It requires a cast of nine J 103 and Worcester Tech with 126. 

j de ten yards for a touchdown. | characters, five of which are male and Hates and Brown tied for nixth place 

5 Md kicked the goal. Straight line four female. at 148 points and M. A. C 

{ inging by Hoffman. Van Horn, The plot is laid at a summer hotel laat with 193 points 

.1 Mueller, with Speed's end run- in a secluded part of the Catskill Colby, although they entered teams, 

u.ng. gave Cornell three more touch- mountains. It. the absence of the did not compete. 

downs in the first half which ended hotel proprietor, the beil-l>oy, a col- 

with the ball in the center of the field, lege student, assumes the respousi- 
lirown in Carey's place at center, hilitles of manager. A rich New 

Mocked a punt from Weeks on the York business man arrives at this 

Ift-jaid line and Cornell gained the lovely hotel with his sistei and very 



'THE ARRIVAL OF KITTY" TO 
BE STAGED FOR PROM SHOW 

A Comedy in Three Acts. Has Had 

Successful Bun in New Vork. 

Cast of Nine. 



Ave. weight M.A.C. liue. 

backfield, 168 

" Y.M.C.A. line, 174 

backfield, 108 

WILLIAMS HARRIERS WIN 

N. E. INTERCOLLEGIATES 

H. H. Brown Finishes First in Fast 

Time of 38m. 82.4s. Aggie Team 

Places Laat, 

Running through snow and mud. 



finished 
Itowdoin and 



The individual star was H. H. 
Brown of Williams, who finished 150 
yaids in front of the second man in 
the fine time of '2H rnin. 32 2-5 sec. 
Thompson of Dartmouth took second 
sttractive niece. He brings his ward I place and after a lively tussle, Preti 

the third quarter. In the laat period here to escape the attention of her |of Maine nosed out Francis of Wor- 

Spttd made another touchdown lover, a recent college graduate, and cester fo, third place. 

around end from inside the 15-yard \ to force her to marry an old friend of n>»n..adoD 

line. Ix>ose handling of the ball kept ne* fathers whom she must wed 

Umeli from scoring more in the before 6 o'clock of that day in order 

second half. Most of the gains were to inherit her father's lurge fortune 



■Bids through the line or off tackle. 
it was impossible to handle the wet 
bsti cleanly, »>oth teams fumbled | about the marriage 



liv a will, the uncle is to receive 
1 10,000 if he succeeds in bringing 

Shortly after 



COACH MELICAN RETURNS 

Head coach G. D. Mellcan *15 has 
fully recovered from the operation 
for appendicitis, which he underwent 
at St. Vincent's Hospital, Worcester, 



No. 8 



VARSITY READY TO MEET 
SPRINGFIELD SATURDAY 

Team in Fine Condition. Y. M. C. A. 

College Has Good Record. 

Results of Former Games. 

"On to Springfield" is the Aggie 
slogan for the coming week. On 
Saturday the Maroon and White line 
up against lit-r old rivals, the Spring- 
field Y. II. C. A. College, on Pratt 
field, with strong hopes of repenting 
the results of lasl year's M-13 victory. 

The team that meets the V. M. C. 
A. boys Saturday Iihh been fighting a 
stubborn buttle against odds this fall, 
but the manner in which the men 
fought during the second half of the 
1 01 iit'll game is proof positive that 
the squad is just beginning to "find" 
itself. Only two scores were made 
during the half and they were on 
flukes ; one 011 a fumble, the other 
on u blocked kiik. The levin «» in 
the pink of condition, with the ex- 
ception of Kd wards, who dislocated 




though none of Cornell's mis- j the girls arrival her lover appesra, * iwo weeki ago . He returned to the CAtTAis Hmmon of .Springfield 



tak 



proved costly. Each team suf- learns of the situation and is wrongly 
f«r.d an injury. For Cornell, Tillcv accused of associating with a eboi 
»» taken from the field with a girl by the uncle, who 



ii the real 
"i'lainedankiethat will probably keep offender Forthwith, he disguises 
^ from playing for the rest of the himself 
Kd wards dislocated a collar . love 

,( on lit) ued 00 page f j 



to by the uncle and later, by the 

[CentlaMe 00 pa*« 



college Monday. Although not able 
to take part in any of the active work, 
his services from the side lines will 
be greatly appreciated in whipping 
the team into shape for the Spring- 
field game Saturday. 



bis collar bone in last Saturday « 
contest. But even he may be able 
to play during part of the game. 
Boles, who has been laid up with an 
injured knee, will probably start the 







■ 



game at right half. With the "Old 
Aggie fighting spirit" prevailing 
among the team and the unanimous 
support of the student body coupled 
with it, the squad looks good for a 

win. 

In regard to comparative scores 
Springfield has the better of the 
argument, having defeated Wor- 
cester Tech 20-0 and Tufts 13-6; 
while our record with these teams 
is 7-0 and 0-28. Springfield has 
also won from Trinity, 25-0 ; Mid- 
dlebury 32-0; and Amherst, 20-0. 
She was forced to bow before Col- 
gate 27-14, and last week was 
handed out a 17-2 defeat at the 
hands of the Army. 

In comparison of weights Aggie 
has the advantage of a heavier back- 



The Mass achusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1916. 
MAJaTMEETING THURSDAY 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1916. 



Lots of "Pep" Talk. Takes Alumni 
To Instill Enthusiasm. Every- 
body Out. 

For real "pep" and life the mass 
meeting for Thursday evening in the 
Old Chapel promises well to outdo 
any previous Aggie attempt. As 
this is the only one before the Spring- 
field game, and incidentally the laBt 
of the football season, the enthus- 
iasm which is ordinarily spread out 
over a week will be crowded into one 
night. Many of the alumni will be 
there to instill some spirit into the 
student body. Mr. Damon of the 
economics department, cheer leader 
in 1910, will Bhow how they used to 
send the team off in his days. "Kid" 




Weeks 



Capt. Grayson 
Tiuo of Veterans 



Day 



field and a line that is but a few | 
pounds lighter. The big problem of , 
the team will be to stop the fleet' 
footed Sermon in his spectacular end , 
running and to break up the long, 
forward passes often pulled off under | 
the mask of this formation, for most 
of Springfield's games have been won 
by the aerial route. Tufts, one of the 
strongest teams of the college world, 
going down to defeat before it. 
' Results of Aggie-Springfield games 
since 1890: 





M. A. C. 


SFBIKQFIELD 


1890 


18 


12 


1890 


10 


14 


1891 





30 


1892 


16 


18 


1893 


6 


1M 


1894 No 


game 




1895 No 


game 




1896 No 


game 




1897 No 


game 




1898 No game 




1899 


17 





1900 No 


game 




1901 


10 





1902 Nc 


igame 




1908 


12 





1904 


11 





1905 


15 





1906 


21 


4 


1907 


5 





1908 


5 


a 


1909 


6 


1M 


1910 


3 


15 


1911 


8 


12 


1912 





41 


1913 





14 


1914 


3 


17 


1915 


14 


18 



M. A. C. won 9, teat 10, tied 1. 



Gore *13, will be on hand with one of 
his good old "pep talks." Dr. Chap- 
man '08, of the botany department, 
an enthusiastic follower of the football 
world, will also give some good ad- 
vice. Call haB been sent out to past 
football captains urging their pres- 
ence at the meeting or at least a let- 
ter from them suitable to rouse the 
old "on to Springfield" feeling. So 
the old chapel will abound with en- 
thusiasm— Remember, Thnrjday eve- 
ning at 7-00. Rumors are afloat of 
a razoo party. 

The special train will leave for 
Springfield, Saturday, at 12 o'clock, 
arriving at 12-50. The train leaves 
Springfield fo r Amherst at 11-30 p.m. 

"EC" MEETING WEDNESDAY 

That the recently organized Agri- 
cultural Economics Club is starting 
on the beginning of a most success- 
ful year was shown by a lively and 
interesting meeting on the evening of 
Nov. 15. Westman '17 spoke on 
• ' Factors of Agricultural Production . " 
At this time the constitution, drawn 
up by the executive committee, was 
presented and adopted. 

The next meeting of the club will 
be held Wednesday, Nov. 22, at 7 
p. m., in Clark Hall, when Prof. 
Peacock of the farm management 
Department will give a talk on the 
interesting phases of his work. The 
last half hour will be devoted to 
open discussion at which any ques- 
tion may be asked. All men inter- 
ested whatsoever are urged to attend 
these lectawa and discussions and 
find out how little they really know 
of the economic* of agricultural 
problems. 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 



FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing. 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desk* and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

Society Brand Clothes 

Frrr (/r/nr/y lo Amherst of 
anv purchase— hi r«r or s/na//. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

OAm Boms: 1-3. "-* v- »>■ Mmday and 
other hi.urh t>> ajipotatSMttt. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 



51 



oscar l. Mcculloch 

Suffolk St. Holyoke. Ma* 



Croysclale Irir* 

-.H III 1IAIU.K\. MAN*. 

Thanksgiving Dinner— 1 P. M. 

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ya Madison Ave.. New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degreei 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY. CLERGY AND CHOIR 





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Northampton, Mawcbutetu 

EUI0PEAN PLAN 

The Beit Place to Din* 

All Kind, of SW Food 

KfieHal luncheon from 1MB Wl p,», 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by toe Florlcaltiiral Dtp!. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rat" 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses una 
ideal conditions. Roses, carn»ti^ 
violets, chrysanthemums and »*« 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



■ 



— A la carte •»**»«• 

6-30 a. m. to 11-30 p. a. 



R. J, RAHAR, Prop, 




Oil Breakfasts. 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Lwrtwi, 60c 
Sunday TaMi d'Hoto mm, W* 

GORHAM BENEDICT, Mp 



NEW YORK ALUMNI »l'»t tl»e club express to President 

HAVE THIRTIETH REUNION ' il > tterfiel(1 ils highest respect for his 



Robert A. Cochran '82 of Mayaville, 
Ky., Symposianh. 

The New York alumni foregathered 
Ht the Manhattan hotel, Nov. 11 for 
its 30th annual function. The post- 
prandial exercises were opened by 
Hob Cochran, vice-president of 
the club, reading from its president 
the following telegram i 

"KKYMoOk, 1st*., Nov. 11, 1916. 
Regret exceedingly that I shall not 
be able to be With you this evening 
| always look forward with much 
pleasure to the annual dinner of the 
New York club of Massachusetts 
Agricultural College Alumni and wish 
1 might be there tonight to join with 
others in assuring President Butter- 
geld of our approval of his work in 
the past and our confidence in the 
future under his wise and constructive 
management. 

Daniel Wn.uRn." 

The Symposiarch then carried us 
back to his college days of 1878-30. 
It has been truthfully said that if any 
undergraduate missed in those days 
anything going lo the lines of practi- 
cal sociology thai mad was not Bob 
Cochran. Clasn rows and rampuaet 
—the bloody rushes at Amherst col- 
lege, active participation in the noble 
work of extinguishing town fins, 
felicitous meetings with '-Old Stock" 
ami other members of the faculty. 
*seu!alons to Boston and the eojoy- 
ment of the old time dramatics at the 
Boston Museum — all these ami much 
nore we heard of. 

Introduced in grateful terms for 
Ins splendid work, the president of 
our Alma Mater addressed us in a 
speech of intimate feeling which can 
not be here reproduced. All that can 
be said is that each man present gave 
thanks for the work that has been 
done on the foundations laid by Chad- 
boiirne, Clark, fioodell, Goeasraann, 
Parker. Stockbridge, Totten and 
others. 

Woolson 71, Minor 7:1, Wheeler 
'*:>, Morse *9.*» and Lamson '\2 fol- 
lowed and all on the line of reminis- 
cinres. The men of the first classes* 
must have been endowed with large 
stocks of constitution for their repre- 
sentatives were boys in feeling and 
not vet middle-aged In appearance. 
Some one must write up an intimate 
imtur v of those first days for the men 
concerned are very much living. It 
w«uf great interest to watch amaze- 
ment flicker over the faces of the very 
recent graduates when the first day 
equipment of the institution was 
described And learning of this 
limited equipment, the abiding im- 
pre>iBion was that those first classes 
i< v e(l a full intercollegiate life. Lam- 
>•■ in the last of the above speeches, 
made the pertinent remark, that "he 
Wild rather attend a reunion like 
tiiii and meet the older ami oldest 
zraiiatpg than one of his own time" 
>tionof Labia *84, duly see- 
"tuifcd and unanimously voted wai 



work r-nd its undeviating loyalty to 
the ideals and principles he is man- 
aging the institution on. It was alBO 
unanimously voted to express our 
thanks to President Hntterfleld and 
Symposiarch Cochran for their 
attendance and speaking. Music 
under the leadership of Choragus 
Foot 78 played its prominent pint. 
May we all meet another year, 

John A. Cittkk. 'S9. 



POULTRY AND EGG SHOW 

To Be Held at Stockbridge Hall Dec. 
15 and 16. Competition Open to 

Commercial Men and Students 

The second annual dressed market 
poultry and egg show will be held 
here Dec, 15 and 16. The exhibi- 
tion of eggs is a new feature this 
vear, which was added through the 
request of many of the exhibitors. 

The primary object of the show, 
which is now becoming an annual 
affair, is for the experience and edu- 
cation of the men majoring in poul- 
try. Professor Payne has arranged 
a group of committees, composed 
of the student* Of the department, 
which will have full charge of the 
show. David H. Ruttrick of Arling- 
ton has been appointed superiliteud- 
i-iit. 

Competition is open' to the com- 
mercial poultry men of tin* state, as 
W i !! | men of Ifc* college. 

They will, bowever, compel! In oTf« 
ferent classes. The prizes offered 
are ribbons, dressed poultry, and 
cups, A beautiful cup has beefl 
given by Batchelder & Snyder Co. 
of Boston, which will bear on one 
side the signature of the exhibitor 
winning the largest numlrer of points 
on market poultry and on the other 
the signature of the student who 
wins the largest number of points 
judging eggs mid poultry. The cup 
is to remain the property of the col- 
lege. John Mullen of Amherst also 
offers I trophy in the dry picking 

contest 

The show will b* held in Stock- 
bridge Hall H last year, and in view 
of the f«cl that the entire exhibit 
will be staged on one floor, it will 
facilitate mailers greatly for the 
spectators. As was the case last 
year, the exhibits, unless otherwise 
specified, will be auctioned of during 
the last afternoon, 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college men, from $1.50 to $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp. also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 up. 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Keady-to-wear Clothes for young men from Atterbury System- Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 "P- 

Made-to-your-measure Clothes, from $25.00 up. 

Mr, Campion personally superintends to fitting in 
this department and is an expert in the business. 

One of thk Best CUSTOM Tailoring Departments in the Statk 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS 6L0VES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOW BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trooser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



SPRIWGFIILD THEATERS 

For tin- bent-fit of Ao* planning 
to attend some theatre after lit 
Springfield gnaw n«t Saturday, * 
Hili.-dule of performance* follows ; 
Court S.iniire— Uobert Kdeton in 
.•Hi« Keep"'* Brother." rWi W 
ace — vaudeville and motion pietarw, 
I»l»zii -vaudeville hikI motion pie- 
Hirers, Broadway - motion pWttW 
ptya nnd tiitiMe. WJ0H— WW* tod 

lllutIfJ „ picture*. rex— mottoo pic- 
ture productions tad tMffi 




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POR forty yem *»e keee rendered faithful »ervice. For forty 

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i4 f t l Tru» untiring effort has buik for us not only "Hie World's 

Larfett MmI Order Seed Batmen, but J» a World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and urtdssputed leadership. The 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of BarptVa Annual. **• 

"Leading American Sead Catalog" m brighter and 

better than ew. It « mailed free, A postcard will bring it, 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower., 

Buildings PiuUdelpfeia 



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PaKe 9 n Shoe Store 

Lar gest Stock— Lowest Prices 
Kxpert Hepalrlng-Be-t leather u«ed 

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Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 









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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21. 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1 916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Publiabed every Tuesday ^ening 
by the Students of the Masaachu- 
aettH ARricultural College- 

HOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHA1U) W. SMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

Mil KOKI> K. LAWKENCE '11. A.sLt*nt Editor 
WU.UAM BAVILI.K. JB- W. Alo.,-1 Editor 



\B8(«IATK KlUTOHH. 

JOHN T DfSOB '" 

JOBEl'M F. WHITNEY *17 
FKANK .1. BINKS'lW 

NATHAN W. CH.LETTE 1« 
EDWARD N. MITC HEIX '18 
ELIOT M. BUKFl'M '19 

MYIITON F. EVANS '19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER n. itu.ine.. Manager 

JAMES C. row ELL '1». 

Awisunt BnStaSM Manager 

1I1ROER R- ROSKOI1ST 'IS, 

" lK Advertliing Manager 



Subscription |8.00 per year. Single 
copies, K cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of clianiM- of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon M possible. 

Entered at aecond-claM matter at the An.herat 
Poat Office. 

Vol. XXVII. Toesday, Nov. 21. No. 8 



,.,„., I. AR VS. KEl-RKSKSTATIVE. 

Tin i insistent efforts of the Com- 
mons Club to secure recognition on 
the part of the fraternity conference 
m-iv not express any keen desire for 
membership in that organization but 
it does voice a demand from the 
n.ntral body of this college for more 
representation in every phase of stu- 
dent life. The conference by its 
very constitution exists with the 
avowed purpose of furthering the in- 
terests of fraternities and fraternity 
men at M. A. C. What becomes of 
the other forty per cent is apparently 
of little concern to them The one 
organization whose original function 
was to take care of these non-frater- 
nily men is the Commons Club. Its 
justification for existence depends 
ni „»n its fulfilling this mission and 
when it goe» seeking after strange 
gods it < eases to be a Commons Club. 
We hope and trust that this non-fra- 
ternity organization will keep to its 
original principles and not become 
one more unit in the already complex 
system of M. A- C fraternity life. 
* Does it not, on the other hand, 
seem a hit hopeless to picture a stu- 
dent body supposedly working for 
the college while pulling in opposite 
directions? ()u one side is the fra- 
ternity and all the ideals of social 
development for which it stands, 
while on the other side we have the 
non-fraternity element, mote or less 
»norgant«d, bat none the less sin- 
cere in working for the best interests 
of the college. Imagine the tremend- 
ous energy expended in the continual 
competition between these various 
groups, energy which might have 
been put to constructive use. And 
where does it all end if not in bicker- 
ings, and jealousies and much ado 
about nothing? And wherein does 



the college receive any benefit from 

it all? 

We believe the fraternity confer- 
ence has a bigger obligation than 
merely looking out for its own inter- 
ests. We believe, also, that it could 
well he expanded into a larger or- 
ganization representing not only each 
fraternity, but each group of say 
thirty, non- fraternity men, including 
in this class members of the Com- 
mons Club. Members of the con- 
ference would not be chosen by the 
student body, but by the organiza- 
tions themselves. The new confer- 
ence would take over all the powers 
now vested in the Benate, togethei 
with its original prerogatives. The 
senate as at present constituted would 
be done away with and popular gov- 
ernment, so-called, would give place 
to a more representative form. We 
might cite as advantages of this 
plan the fact that members of the 
student government would then be 
chosen for their ability rather than 
their popularity. Furthermore, every 
organization could have representa- 
tion, leaving no one cause for com 
plaint that his particular group was 
left out of the runniug. l'opular 
support back of the studeut govern- 
ment would no longer be marred by 
petty prejudices based upon the un- 
equal representation of fraternities 
in the governing hod?. Sooner or 
later in the interests of democracy 
the demand of the non-fraternity 
man will be heard and granted, and 
fraternity exclusiveness will find 
small place to hide itself. The prin- 
ciple involved lies far beyond any 
consideration of rushing rules or 
other points of contention, iu the in- 
herent right of all parts of a com- 
munity to equal representation in the 
government of the community. Al- 
though the proposal we make is a 
radical departure and is full of 
imperfections, nevertheless, it rep- 
resents a basis for further argument. 
We here present it in the hope that 
it may provoke some discussion upon 
this problem which hits every man, 
fraternity and neutral, with equal 
force. 



(M5 ,, M -chemistry Club meeting. 

Saturday, Nov, 26 

12-00 m- Special train t.. Sprimrliidd. 
IS A M. Station. 
2-80 P m.- Varsity Football. at, A.C. 
vs. Sprin«1ielil ST. >'• ( '• A - 
College at Springfield, 

MM. AY, Nov. 2») 

o-iu x it.— Sunday chapel, Mr. Fred U, 
Smith, of Johns-Man ville 
Company, New Vork city. 

ft-46 Pl m.- V. M. C A, -neetin- in 
Social Union Kooms. 
TrJEBDAl . Nov. "iH. 

7-ihi r. m.— «lee club rehearsal, Old 
Chapel. 



Harmony 

It has become a point of good 
fellowship, and he that will re- 
fute to take a pipe Of tobaou 
among his fellows is accounted 
peevish and no good company. 

See the 

Harmony Keg of 
Good Fellowship 

—at— 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



SPEAKERS FOR THE WEEK 



The REXALL Store 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

INotlrM for ttali column •honlrt be dropped in 
atther.,i.ir.ni*N nffle, or banded to Nathan 
W. HlUetl* *1H on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each iaane! 

\V*:nXK8t»AV, No\ . 'it 

(.10F.lt, Assembly. Mr. Samuel f. 

Kbler. member of Executive 

Committee. Leagu e lo Knlon ••• 

I'eaee, IVosloti. 

H-3U i*. m. Mandolin Club Uehenrsai, 

.s, M ial Union. 
7 _, K) ,, m.— Agricultural k.-.hi.uhW-* 

club. Clark Bail, Uoom B, 
7-(Xi |», m. Microbiology Club, Library 
of Microbiology Buiblinu. 
Tin -uhiiay Snr, M 
7-00 r, m.-Mhbh Meeting, old chapel. 
Florist's and Hardeners' Club 
meeting. Fn twli Hall, after 
mass meeting. 
FimiAY, Nov. 84, 
6-30 p.m.- Mandolin <lub Hehearaal, 
Social Union. 



Sunday Chapel. 
Mr. Fred B. Smith of the Johns- 
Mauville Company, New York City 
is to give the address at Suuday 
chapel, Nov. 88. Mr. Smith has 
heen extremely prominent in Y. M. 
C. A. work throughout the country 
and has heen international secretary 
of the organization. Mr. Smith, who 
was born in Iowa, graduated from 
Iowa State University. At the time 
of the war with Spain, he was engaged 
in Y. M,C. A. work with the soldiers 
in Cuba. Since then he originated 
and has lead the famous "Men and 
Religion Forward Movement," which 
is represented in about fifteen hun- 
dred cities and towns. In 1910, he 
was made International Secretary of 
the Y. M. C A. Mr. Smith is the 
author of the book -Men Wanted." 
Wednesday Assembly. 
George I). Chamberlain represent- 
ative to the state legislature from 
Springfield is to speak at Wednesday 
assembly, Dec. 6. 

REPRESENTATIVES OF LAND 
GRANT COLLEGES CONFER 

The annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of Agricultural Colleges and 
Experimental Stations held last week 
at Washington, D. C, proved to be 
of the most vital importance to the 
future of state institution-. The 
conference was made up of represen- 
tatives of all the land grant colleges 
in the country, Massachusetts holding 
the ungual position of being the 
only state college that is strictly 
devoted to agriculture and allied 
studies. Among the discussions of 
the meeting was the introduction of 
a hill in Congress for the establish- 
ment of engineering experimental sta- 
tions. Hans were advanced for a 
future conference of all state sup- 
ported educational organizations for 
the working out of a rural policy on 
a national scale involving the conse- 
quences to America of peace in Eu- 
rope, on industry, military prepared- 
ness, and finances. Much emphasis 
was placed on the great demand for 
trained men in an agricultural world 
which has never before seen such 
activity. There are thousands of 
opportunities open, especially in 
teaching, research, extension work 
and industrial lines. 



INDISPUTABLE PROOF OF 

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The mom important of all l>ntier-»< soring 
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To produce hinh uraid 
butter yon moat ha\ I ." 
fine dualit* of < -leati. 
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They w« U»mo«t«w«w^2ffi2^ti to- 
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"^l Mi.«|tfl^l«m&^irt 
also fnrnlslWHl. P^ n t -f^l?i*fifti™M!«4*lj/ 
Terms: I'aym^ntwlliordertJWI^J ^ tgf * 
VfiiSra. los'ducotin* al owed on^rae^ 

two or mora W^*41i 
personal check* »0Jt be 

Try theio tlrf* «ww; 
t>e coDTlnced «f th- .ir wrrj 
hiphqnalilles. SoldfflWO* 
to *• oonsomer only. 

%%*$$$£$?** 

DoubUSenrlc«Tlr«jk 
Rubber Co.. Akroo, O. 
9 Dept. 




CHOOSE TEAM TO JUDGE 

AT CHICAGO STOCK SHOW 

Prof. J. C. McNutt plans to take 
geven Aggie men to the International 
Stock Judging Show at Chit-ago. 
Dee. 4 to 8, where they are to par ici- 
pate in the students* judging contest. 
Charles H. Clough '17 of Dedharu, 
Samuel V. Noyes '17 of Georgetown, 
Alfred O. Kinsman *17 of MerritiiHc, 
Everett L. Upson *17of New Britain, 
COM., Thomas S. Dillon '18 of 
West Warren, Michael J. McNamara 
'17 of Stoughton, and Merrill P. 
Warner *17 of Sunderland are to 
make the trip. Thev leave Spring- 
lield Nov. 30 and go direct to 
Chicago where they hegin the stock 
judging in the competition Dec. I. 
They will spend two or three days at 
ghow and one day in the packing- 
houses and stock-yards of the city. 
From there the men are to visit the 
ntate university and several promi- 
nent dairy and stock farms eu route. 
They will also stop at Buffalo and 
Niagara Falls, arriving in Amherst 

Dec '.». 



TO DISCUSS CHRISTIANITY 

The discussion of the topic "Are 
church-goers hypocrites," at the in- 
formal meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 
Inst Thursday, proved so interesting 
that it seemed the desire of all pres- 
ent to continue this subject at some 
future date. Since Mr. Mutkekar, a 
graduate student from India, has con- 
sented to lead the talk Sunday even- 
ing, the origin >l topic will have to he 
postponed until after the Thanksgiv- 
ing receBS, when it will he resumed. 
Mr. Mutkekar will try to portray 
for the student body the Oriental idea 
of Christianity from the view potato! 
the Hindu and, to make this interest- 
ing, he will ask tpiestions concerning 
the fundamentals of Christianity as 
the American sees it, contrasting it 
with the idea the Hindu holds. The 
meeting will come Sunday, Nov. 
ft, around the cosy fire of the social 
union at 6-45 p. m. This new date 
it being tried as a sort of experiment. 

"THE ARRIVAL OF KITTY" 

(Continued from pag* 1 1 



intended bridegroom who arrives from 
Italy. To add to the complications. 
th* aunt offers her brother a large 
MB of money if he will obtain a bus- 
band for her, and accordingly he wires 
a matrimonial agency. The man 
from Italy arrives and is mistaken by 
the uncle aa the candidate for his 
- -ter'g hand. Affairs become more 
involved when the real chorus girl 
appean. Ludicrous events follow 
and hold the interest nntil the end 
winch is satisfactory to all. 

TrvQiits for the cast will be held 
tht flrit of next week, announcement 
<>f dale to be made later. Members 
*>f all classes will be eligible, and 
•penal interest should be shown by 
sophomores and freshmen. Several 
wpi-N-piid trips are planned for, thus 
Muni ing a fine season for the cast. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Harold K, Jones ex- 18, who trans- 
ferred to the junior class at Amlieist 
this fall, has pledged Delta Cpsilon. 

The post-graduates held basketball 
practice in the Drill Hall Monday 
evening. About 1*2 candidates re- 
ported. 

An early crop of peas and beans 
has been grown by the botany de- 
partment to supply the sophomoies in 
the laboratory with seedlings. 

With the coming of winter, it is 
noticed about the campus that the 
old and familiar mackinaws are grad- 
ually giving way to the modern 
"sheep-skin" top coat. 

The class in elementary pomology 
are pruning apple trees in the old 
orchard recently acquired hy the 
college. The new property is located 
near the H. 6 M. station in Aiulicist. 

Robert K. Brown ex-lH has entered 
Bowdoin. He was declared ineligi- 
ble for the intercollegiate cross- 
cotiiitry run. owing to his jitteutlanif 
at M. A. ('■ for one year. The 
Bowdoin coach thinks that in Blown 
be has an intercollegiate champion. 

DEAN WARREN DELIVERS 

PHI KAPPA PHI ADDRESS 

»*A scholar is the real thing, made 
out of the best stuff that humanity 
affords," said Dean Warren of Bos- 
ton University in the annual Phi 
Ivappa Bhi address given at assembly 
Wednesday. 

He characterised the scholar as 
the man who wants the troth, who 
sets out to know it, and who treasures 
truth when he gets it. Obseivation 
is the first step in knowledge, yet 
there are miuy of us who do not 
study OUt the things which we are in 
daily contact with. The distinction 
between fact and near-fact is the 
second step. Of explanation. This 
is a matter of reseat eh and reflection. 
The third step in the development of 
knowledge it to 'lean back and look 
it over" The scholar mulls over a 
fact and makes it his own. 

He cited the custom of the kt burn 
ings" of Virgil and analytical geotn- 
ptry as typical of the wrong attitude 
toward knowledge. It symlKjIizes 
a leave-taking, letting hard-earned 
knowledge go. 

Knowledge ie the light in which the 
world's work is done, the mastery 
over environment, the organization 
within itself, and the clarifying of 
religious ideas. Kveryone of us 
should bring into our com moner work 
the principles of trm* scholarship, lo 
W ek truth and love truth. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Rev. C. J. Hawkins Speaks. 
"Life is ft divine game, dealing 
with (Jod every second, and it is up 
tt) each individual to write his record 
high" said Uev, C.J. Hawkins, pas- 
tor of the the Central Congregational 
church of Jamaica Plain, at Sunday 
chapel, on the text "What I have 
written 1 have written." From the 
religious point of view, we may look 
for divine and human forgiveness for 
our sins, but from the natural stand- 
point, a stain on our characlei can 
never be erased. Man can forgive, 
but Nature cannot. Will, energy, 
intellectual reserve, and faith in 

self and fellow men if developed, 

will etpiip us to meet the world 

successfully. 



AMANGE TBIASGULAR MEET 

An annual triangular track meet 
with New Hampshire State and Ver- 
mont iathe latent possibility in M 
A. C athletics according to Manager 
Flint. The date aa set at present 
will be the week after the inteicol- 
tsgiates and the meet will be held at 
M A. C. every third year. 



FLORICULTURE TRIP 

Major Students Visit Plant oi A. N. 
Pierson in Cromwell, Conn, 
(in Saturday, Nov. I*. students 
in floriculture, under the guidance of 
Professor Nebrling, visited the retail 
flower stores uf Hartford. Ciuin.. and 
the wholesale establishment < »f the 
A. N. Pierson ( o.. Cromwell, Conn. 
Thomas B. Beers '!•_', oi f the high 

Officials t>f the Brm, escorted the stu- 
dents around Ihe plant, which constats 

of S8 acres under glass, growing a 
gnat variety of Sowers for the retail 
and wholesale trade. The trip was 
of great interest and opened up to 
those taking it, the great possibilities 
in lloiiculturc. Mr. Beers spoke 
highly of tin- work of M. A. ('. men 
employed by the company. Be also 
gave the Students some very good 
advice. Those viHliiin the plant 
were I'rof. \ .11 . Nchi ling. Assistant C. 
K. Wildon 'tft, L. II. -lones 'If, II. 
A. IVatt IT. II. S. Saidel 17. r, 
.1. Duncan 'I*. I- II. Lawrence 'I*. 
R. A. l.awton 'IH and F. A Woods 

•18. 



WITH THE FACULTY 

The 'American City" foi Noveru 
her contains an illustrated article on 
••Willauer's Park Subdivision, 
Waiiwatoss, Wisconsin" by Mr. F. 
A. dishing Smith of the landscape 
department. This is s modern land 
subdivision near Milwaukee designed 
by Mr. Smith himself. 

Professor Wsugh was the print i 
pal speaker last week at the 20th 
anniversary of the l.aay Club, a 
famous horticultural organization of 
Cornell University. 

" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And oth«-f R r ».d thing* to CM. 

MRS, L. M, STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

T«l. 4JJ-W 

QNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every undent will meet 

with a cordial welcome 

kh.i i »i« UM©** sn»VICE,AT# P.M. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

lUsirll. I.iliiiiln ilill Kt nit* tun M- . 

BOSTON, rtASS. 



(ini\ two iiiiiiku from South iiiMiiii.il si.i 
Hon, unit easily it'it"li«'«i from North Station 
lis Klmatcil itiillwiiy, HUtl ronv»nl»llt alike 
to the irreal i.-tuiliitiioiimiml bMlitM* centre. 

also to the theaiir* it ml phut"* of jnIiTc»l 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

T.i liY anil MVt !■'•' ttUMiii luituo'ii, 
Itookli'l ami iiiit|i M*ut ii |h>ii application 

TILLY HAYNES. JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



f BSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK. AMHERST. MASS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 



PounUin I'enn 



\K<*ut* f"i KM I'>|m-» titer 



I . M.CURRAN 



C.ri-. DYIk 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS ANO CARPETS 

i i> m \ Ran i si \ i ^ 
Stkimikn Lank Fui.i.rR. ln«. 

MAftl'Mtl'liHIIVil JRW'HI.CKn 

ihii HMUAUWAT. SKW YORK 

<'I,IM1 ,\ni> < ol.l.lt.i: 
I'INN A>'IJ MIMUM «* 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

No* l.trjtr-1 nm p"*t •.Mil* t lp on* flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I liwral Tickft SyMem 1*1 ^-M 

College Stationery 

With Class Numeral*. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 



»i 397 High St 



-SKLL.N 



Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and nee our 
l)ig store. 





1 



The Massachusett s Collegian, Tue sday, Nov. 21, 1916. 



ThelMassachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21,"1916. 



S. S. HYDE 
jeweler & optician; The Holyoke Valve* Hydrant Co. 

- r,l . »it I . ,, , ».• K. I., ,„ -jtifi KfilSS l-'llMT. ValVM 



13 Pleasant St 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. m Broken Unses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly -.nd Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



E. B. DICKlNSON,D.D.S. 

M VIAL ROOMS 



FRESHMEl^GErROPirPULL MR. COWLS TO ADDRESS 

BY TWENTY-EIGHT FEET THE ST0CKBR1DGE CLUB 

Good coaching and thorough pruc- An instructive ™^*J % 
tice were the factors responsible for ; Stock bridge club will be held Wed 
tice weieiMiuw t* Stoekbridge hall 

bbers of Wrought Hon ana Brass ripe, *-.." , . j ye freshman VlCtOlV IH Hie Hl»o»> m ' = 

,nd FmtnKs lor Stenn,. Water and G av \sbestos tlie Oecisive «»c . , C'owlsof North Amherst 

and B Boilei and Pipe Coven., K s. pip* i , ua | freshman-sophomore six-man wUen JHr. V OW1S 
^feoV^^*tW%*?^ ^ puU held Saturday afternoon. 1 will give a lecture, more or less I lu - 
^"KlXX'SEZ. X huskies of 1920 gained a foot of trated, on South American agrieul- 

the starter's 



Connections. 



Williams ttlnck, 

nffi.-e II. .him B in iv a. ii 



Amherst. Mass 

.. i-:m t" in I". 



ItliCKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



"IIAMP 



»• 



Ths Highland Hotel 

telrv run on the l-urnpean Flan. It is jusi ycv 
Irani Vun Street, away from the no.*- and dust 
/nd yetln the center of the business district. 

It* moms we well furnished and comfortable, 
hav^n teleU.„.e and hot and cold runn.ne 
Pterin eve., room. Prices • I and u P , rooms 
with bath (si«.Rlei «I.SO and up. 

it««<-ellent cuisine and "el! ventilated dining 

serv^ld in the best possible manner. 

St a »at the HiBhland Hotel once and you will 
annate stav.ng there again. M>»k -e,v 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

„ lr |,l» »«-!. *,.Hn««H.I. *•••• 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

111 \i:\ K. willTF. 
HI HJHsfltfltfr. N..i : .,.sx....^ 

MMdoliw. «.*nulne U^Uhi. I WW* Pi.-ke. 

e,rin 8 ..e«,.,»..U i, ,., ;,l. in.mniHM.- 

; ,,1 Mu.es. lnrtrttw«l» .».»> »«■ had on trial. 



Seniors and Juniors 



Now is the time 
buy those 



to 



FILING CASES 

For \<>ur Bulletin. 



Johnson Book Go. 

Hahuitt WooimoRTii 

\l|.|i;t SiKWR I'I'i 1 I<»iij4e. 



rope at the crack of 
pistol, gaining continuously after 
foot holes were established until 28 
feet 3 inches of sophomore rope 
changed sides. 
The teams were : 

Krneat F.^exto.i. Ki'M.iellilUa.i.-l.anl 
KiiMiiniidl..Sewl.m.l\:ui A. Roberts, 
George Castle. J«dni A. Crawford, 

Samuel Ferris. Allen HiWIU, 

llandd W. Poole, •)• K. I>eleli.ini, 

ErrolC. Perry, K. Harold Holland, 

i; K tteadlu .mar.i D. H- Smith (wgr.) 



WHEAT PIT A SUCCESS 

Thousands of dollars were Inst and 
won in Clark Hall Nov 16, The 
students in Agricultural Kcoiioimca 
75 gave a representation of the 
Chicago wheat pit in full swing. 
The pit was conducted by Do. tor 
Alexander K. Cance The students 
readily entered into the spirit of the 
work and there were some very 
lively transactions. David liuttriek 
•17 was on the winning end, and in 
theory is now rolling around the 
campus in a limousine. Noviusky's 
attempt to comer the market boosted 

the price »l> ■ few l ,omtB nul ' ac " 
,.,„diog to Prof- Cance. landed 
Noviusky in jail. 







Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS XND POULTRY DRESSERS 

w hoi Wit y. BXSA 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal. Pork, Hams. Bacon. Sao- 

sages. Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, 

Eggs. Olive Oils. 



|IIa<-k-i..i,e. North ami S'««t" <«*""'■ 8 '*• 

riASS. 

BOSTON, . 




A 




MEN'S STORE 



Shoes Hats Furnishings 

U- ^'^.CK co .. LAMM C o.. BKOWMMI. K, N0 *C».. ^ 
11UK DISCOUNT TICKIT SAVES VOL j% 



C&rpervter & Morehovist, 
PRIT 




WAITERS HAND OUT A 

BEATING TO SCULLIONS 

Playing the tightest game seen on 
Alumni field this year, the Waiters 
subdued the Scullions IS to 6 for the 
championship of Draper Hall, on 
Saturday afternoon. The line diives 
of Frellick of the Towel team, und 
the leaping rushes of Kennedy '1« of 
die Trav team were the shiniest per- 
lfounan.es. Kaimif and Callanan, 
the Scullion ends, made good gains, 
aD d waiter Lipshues showed ag- 
gressiveness. The losers have re- 
covered and want another game. 



MAYORALTY CANDIDATE 

AN AGGIE ALUMNUS 

AlvertusJ. Morse *94, has receutly 
been nominated at the republican 
primaries for mayor of Northampton. 
HU opponent wa» Mayor Feiker, 
who has held the office for the past 
five years. Mr. Morse is a well- 
known lawyer of Northampton, hav- 
ing received his LI- B- from Bos- 
ton University after Wa giaduation 
from M. A. C. 



No i. Cook Place. 



Amherst. Mssa 






•* 



PATRONIZE AN AGGIE MAN 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

* \TISF ACTION (SUA RAVI ! I ■!• 

LARRY GAY. PROP. REAR OF AGGIE INN 



HOCKEY NOTES 
Wesley 8. Sawyer *I8 of Jamm-ia 
Plain is assistant manager of varsity 
hockey for the coming season, while 
Carlton T. Smith '18 of West New- 
ton is assistant manager in charge of 
freshman team. The freshmen will 
pa ve a schedule this year. 



trated, on South American agricul- 
tural conditions. Mr. Cowls spent 
most of last year in an extensive 
tour of that continent engaging in 
agricultural research work largely for 
his own interest. It U somewhat 
probable that at this time, Professor 
McKimmie will speak, for he also Is 
well acquainted with Latin-Amerlcah 
conditions. 

1916 NOTES 

\{. V. Taber is doing extenBioi) 
work in farm management in New 
Hampshire, l»eing located in Durham. 
He has been in Durham since the 
first of August and is enthusiastic 
over the work. Enclosed in his let- 
ter was a check representing the re- 
mainder of the class funds. Thanks. 

Ralph. 

-•.leff" Kilbon of Lambton Mills. 
Ontario, Canada, care Park Lawn 
Cemetery Company, Limited, of 
Toronto. In the morning he getB 
several surveying parties started 
right, gives the 1k>ss his instructions 
for the day and then sweeps out the 

office. 

The secretary hesitates to say this, 
but he is considering strikin' up a 
dicker with .left for a small lot of in 
dividual burying-groundB, these to 
he distributed at Christmas to those 
of the class who apparently have 
passed away. 

Heinie Walker is at present on the 
Mister farm, Hardwick, Mass. 

A If led Anthony Gioiosa, '28 Biek- 
nell St., Dorchester. "Joe" i« 
working for the Union Central Life 
Insurance Co. 

Alfred Topha m. Laudhohns Farms. 
Wells, Me. 

Cv Little. 70 Purchase St., New- 
buryport, Mass. Cy is studying in 
the Harvard School of Public Health. 
Harvard Medical School, and 

M. I. T. 

Society note —Dutch Schlotter- 
beck, B. He, and several other Aggie 
lads from "Alpha Sig Farm" called 
on a girl in Framingham last week. 
The orchar *s at Stannox farm. Sher- 
barn, are under Dutch's care. 

Correction.— The Hat of 191« men 
at the Highland in Springfield on 
Oct. 16 did not include the name of 
Doc Mooney. Doc was there. 

though, 

Frank Anderson *16 expects log© 
into the motion picture basine»iW« n 
•Pete" Mattoon *1G and H*l' 
Hunt '16 are working in Medfotd 

CONCERT IN ACADEMY 
The combined musical clubs 0* ■« 
A. C. and Amherst will give « «"•- 
,-ert in the Academy of Hv& «• 
Northampton some time in Apn 
No definite date baa been set 



THE CORNELL GAME 

[Continued from page 1 ] 



Wilill.. 

Is, (Irays.ni ((apt.) 

It, IUaiirhar.1 

In. S|iaul.linii 

c, Roberts 

rg, Dunn 

ii, Edwards 

re. Day 

i|ii, Whittle 

, M.i> nihan 
i lil>. Pond 

Hi, Weeks 

II. Sul.sii- 



1 1 ■ ] 



bone and probably will be unable to 
play in the Springfield game. 

Cornell was penalized 40-yards for 
offside playing and for rough work 
while Aggie was penalized but 10 
yards for offside. 

The lineup : 

< dUSKI.I.. 

Kyersou, le 
• allies. It 
Mille, lg 
Carey, e 
Anderson, rn 
Taylor, rl 
Eckley, re 
Speed, qb 
Van Horn, lhb 
Hoffman, rhb 
Mueller, fb 

Score — Cornell 87, If. A. I 
tutions- -Cornell, THley for Anderson, 
Zander for Kyersou, Drown l.n ( any. 
Jewett for Taylor. Dixon for Jewett, 
Kisber for Mueller: M.A.C, Holmes l"i 
SpauldiiiK, Spaulding for Mlaiuhanl. 
Ilagelstein for (jraysoii, Grayson for 
Whittle, Whittle for Drayson, MoQlnnls 
lor Hattelsteln, Uoodwin for Weeks, 
Weeks for (ioodwin, Maek for Moynilian. 
Touchdowns — .Speed 4, Mueller, Fisher, 
Doal from touehdown — Speed, Refer** 
—V. A. Schwartz of Umwn, Umpire 
I^»uis Hinkey of Vale. Head linesman 
— C. F. Thompson of Cornell, Time 
I .'.-minute periods. 

WILLIAMS HARRIERS WIN 

[Continued from nmire 1 1 

The first Aggie man to finish was 
Bell '17 in 29th place. Sweeney 
and Lyons came next for M. A. C. 
in 37th and 38th and Bainbridge and 
Gordon finished 44th and loth. The 
unfortunate showing of the M. A. C. 
team is attributed to the length of 
their season, which caused the men 
to become a little stale. The indi- 
vidual scoring was as follows : 

Williams— !,«.», 14, » §fl 
Maine-8, 5, 7, 18, IB— 66 
Dartmouth— 2, t, 12, 17, 1U-5* 
M. I. T.-ll, 16, 81, 24. 88-108 
W. P. I.— 4, 20, 22,33, 47— 12*1 
bates— 10, 16, 30, 41. #8—148 
brown— 18, 25, 34, IS, 18— 188 
M. A. C— 88, 37. 88, 44, 45—103 



PROM TO COME FEB. 23 

Junior Prom will come Feb. 23. 
This date is about two weeks later 
than that of last year, due to the fact 
that Varsity basketball will not be over 
until the middle of the month. A 
hockey game is being scheduled for 
this date. There will also be a cabar- 
et dance and Prom show as in former 
years. The decorations will be left 
up for a week that a Prom informal 
may also be worked in. 



FORM CHEMISTRY CLUB 

A 1918 Chemistry Club has been 
formed by those juniors majoring in 
chemistry. The executive committee 
of McNaught, Lampson and O'Neil 
has drrwu up a constitution which will 
be presented to the mernberB Friday 
night, Nov. 24. 

MAYORALTY CANDIDATE 

AN AOOIE ALUMNUS 

Alvertus J. Morse '!»4 has recently 
been nominated by the lepublicau 
primaries for mayor of Northampton. 
His opponent was Mayor Feiker, who 
has held the ollice for the past five 
vears. Mr. Morse is a well knowu 
lawyer of Northampton, having re- 
ceived his LL.B. from Boston Uni- 
versity after his graduation from M. 
A. C. 




INSTALLING NEW EftUIPMENT 
The old sterilizing room at the col- 
lege barn is being renovated and 
new equipment is being installed. 
The old fixtures and apparatus have 
been in use for 10 years and are 
shout worn out. While these 
changes are taking place the college 
milk is being sterilized in Flint lab- 
ma tory. 

BASKETBALL MANAGERS 
Lester Odams T8 has charge of 
the freshman basketball schedule for 
She coming year. Roger Clapp '1*, 
the other assistant manager of bas- 
ketball, will be varsity assistant. 

MICRO CLUB MEETING 
There wiM be a meeting of the 
Microbiology Club, Wednesday, Nov. 
22, at 7 o'clock in the library of the 
Microbiology Building. One of the 
current topics of microbiology will be 
disenssed. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Veterinary Assistant Leaves, 
Arnold P. Sturtevanl, assistant in 
veterinary science, has left to take 
up work with the bureau of Ento- 
mology of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. He will test 
samples of bee disease from all over 
the country and do some research 
work. New address, Drummund. Md. 
Vermont Fruit Show. 
Prof. W. W. Cbenoweth, of the 
pomology department, attended the 
New Kngland fruit show at Mont- 
pelier, Vt., Wednesday and Thursday 
Nov. IS and 16. The show was held 
in union with the Horticultural society 
of Vermont. 

Dr. Shaw, of the experiment 
station pomology department, ad- 
dressed one of the meetings at the 
show. The talk on Wednesday fore- 
ncx.n covered varieties of apples. 
Hi* Thursday lecture was on "The 
Future of Fruit Growing in New 
England." 

Speak in Wilbamstown. 
Dr. Shaw and Mr. Kilham gave 
very instructive lectures on pomology 
at Williamstown on the evening of 

Nov. 13 to »n "»PP le da ?" g» ther " D & 
of farmers. Mr. Kilham spoke on 
"Winter Work in the Orchards" ad- 
vising careful examination and care 
of trees at this time of the year espe- 
Hallv in pruning. Dr. Shaw took for 
his subject -Varieties of Apples, 
speaking of the advantages and dis- 
advantages of various crosses and 
discussing the several valuable quali- 
ties of the perfect apple- 

»1 1— Jack Hutchinson was on the 
campus laat week. 









JUST 
A 



TIP! 



This year it's Sheepskin-Hned Coats that have a clear Held, 
lie sure you have yours before the **bij/" game: von will look 
"right" in one ol these bio; roomy coats and you won't know wli.it 
it is to be cold. 

We have the largest line of these coats hi the state and all we 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that w »■ 
are able to ofler you. Ask the mini who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College photographers . . . 




LOCALLK; 5 2 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 









Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



vGwennnm 



E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over 55 Years 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

THE COE-MORTIMER GO. 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



| fy|f¥n . JJ ^»j«JMIM 






B 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1916. 



PROMINENT LANDSCAPE 
GARDENER VISITS M. 



A. C. 



Mr. Jens .lensen of (I) ion go, 
America's foremost landscape gard- 
ener honored the town of Amheist In 
Lis presence Thursday and Friday. 
He had heen called to New York 
City by certain committees who de- 
sired him to defend, by a written re- 
port, that city's famous Riverside 
Drive from encroachment upon l»v 
the New York Central Railroad. 
Thursday night the senior mem- 
bers of the Landscape Art Club en- 
tertained him in the unique way of a 
supper prepared on forked sticks 
before an open fireplace in an old 
cabin at the Notch. Mr. Jensen 
gave the students a very informal 
talk, between "hot dogs," bacon and 
coffee, opening up to them what he 
assumed to be their duties as future 
American landscape gardeners. 

Friday morning he delivered a 
lecture to the senior landscape class, 
on his impression of New York, con- 
trasting the honest realness of previ- 
ous New York life as illustrated by 
the (plaint old unassuming city hall, 
with the hollow gluttonous commer- 
cialism illustrated by the new munic- 
ipal building He spoke of the lack 
of civic pride of the citizens to 
countenauce for an instant the prop- 
osition of the New York Central 
Wailroad. 



The Massachusetts Aericultural College F0UNTAIN PEN s 



Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's 



Swan's 



Waterman's 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Economic botany 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



PRFXIM INDEX TICKETS 



Next Monday, the 27th, the pre- 
liminary tickets for the 1918 Imhx 
will go on sale, and from the number 
of inquiries we've had, there's going 
to be a big demand for them. Pay 
part of the cost now and the remainder 
when the fademCQUt* out. And say, 
those of you who are not thinking 
real seriously of getting one of those 
prelims, well, theie's something laek- 
iug, that's all. Some of you pretend 
that you don't give a hang about the 
co-eds, but you know that way down 
deep you feel the least mite jealous 
when you see one of your friends 
walking across the campus with them. 
And here's the chance you've been 
waiting for, to get a picture of the 
whole bunch of co-eds, and mind 
you, its the first one that ever was 
taken. There are hundreds of other 
reasons why you should have an Judex 
for each smpshot is an argument in 
itself and there's pages and pages of 
them. Don't go to bed Monday night 
until you have one of those prelims. 
.Monday is the day and Lipshires, 
Pratt, Keumanu, and Messenger are 
the men to see. Adv. 

SET OUT WIND-BREAK 

Home day one may expect to see 
an artistic wind-break and covering 
for the west end of North College, 
for a donble row of small poplars 
has been set out there this week. 
This improvement not only serve* as 
an excellent wind-break for this 
bleak crossing but also covers the 
blank appearance of the basement 
••lit ranee to the dormitory. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Iudex, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

lnterelass Athletic Committee, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

H. E. RobbinB, Manager 

| # . T. liuckman, President 

K. L. Ilolden, Manager 

R. D. Hawley, Manager 

U. S. Flint, Manager 

M. R. Lawrence, Manager 

N. Moorhouse, Manager 

S. F. Tuthill, President 

A. F. Williams, Manager 

D. M. Lipshires, Manager 

F. W. Mayo, Manager 

K. L. Messenger, Manager 

D. 0. Merrill, President 
J. H. Dav, President 

L. T. Iluckman, President 

M.J. McNamara, President 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

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THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOtilE COLLBQB for rtoi - 
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CARS 

Leave AMMEKST for AOOIE COL- 
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l'her«ar*.Se«n>inod Keasom why you »hould 
buy your 

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or 

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tj Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
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Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Citad miv from /A. Mf tc 4 AM 

Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml, alongside the 
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SO Miles of Trackage -modern 
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Teams will call every day at M. A. ^ 

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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 28, 1916. 



No. <J 



M 

M. 

II. 



FIVE GAMES SCHEDULED 
FOR BASKETBALL SEASON 

Regular Practice to Start Monday. 
Much Promising Material Work- 
ing Out Under Coach Gore. 

Manager Moorehouse hus'annouueed 
the varsity basketball schedule for 
the coming season. It consists of 
live games with some of the fast New 
1. 1 ig la nd college teams. For the 
Brat contest the varsity will take on 
Conn, Aggies, who have a fast team 
of veterans. Rhode Island State, 
now under a system of Dartmouth 
coaching and bousting a str >ug 
squad, will be the next Opponent. 
Then will follow two games with 
the fast New Hampshire State quin- 
tet. The season winds up with 
Springfield V. M. C. A. College as 
the attraction, the game to lie played 
in Springfield on some neutral lloor, 
Following is the schedule : 
M. A. C. vs. Conn. Aggie at Am 
herst, .Ian. '_'li. 
A. C. vs. Rhode Island State at 

Amherst, .Jan. 27, 
A. C. vs. New Hampshire state. 

Durham, N. H., Feb. 8. 
A. ('. vs. New Hampshire State 
at Amherst, Feb. 10. 
MA. C. vs. Springfield Y. If. C. A. 
College, Springfield, Feb. 16. 
Though varsity basketball is on 
trial this year, a squad of over fifteen 
promising men is already hard at 
work trying out for the tetrm, thus 
insuring keen competition for each 
position. The learn will be under 
the direction of Coach Core who has 
hud charge of interclass basketball 
in previous years. That he coached 
the last two freshmen teams to the 
interclass championship is ample 
proof of his ability. Coach Core 
will also have charge of the frc-di 
ttiau team. 

The varsity training table started 
jretterdaj morning with the following 
IBM: Squires, Haglesteiu, E. Gray- 
son and Irving *17;Gasier, Hawley 
W. Grayson *18 ; Sedgwick, Park- 
li«ist,Hatchelder, McCarthy and I'oiid 
'Hi, This number will be increased 
as fast as promising material de- 
velops, The men who have been out 
tei football will not start training 
f"i a week, that they may have • 
i<«! after the strenuous football lea- 
■00, The non-football men, how- 
ever, have been hard at work foi 
mm three weeks. 

i Continued on i*g« II 



PLANS WELL UNDER WAY 

FOR 50th ANNIVERSARY 



Exercises to Open Oct. 7. To Start 
Work on Pageant Soon. Pro- 
gram for the Week. 

Elaborate plans for the commemo- 
rative exercises of the Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College have heen put forth 
by Prof. Wm. 1). Hurd, chairman of 
the committee of arrangements. 

The exercises will open Sunday. 
Oct. 7, I !'l 7, with an address by a 
well-known person in keeping with 
the day and celebratiou. Monday, 
Oct. 8, will be given over to intra- 
mural athletics and exercises dedi- 
cating the athletic field, a big foot- 
bull game in the afternoon, and to 
"Undergraduate Night" in the 
evening. 

On Tuesday morning there will be 
a historical program commemorating 
the fifty years' history of the college, 
following which the official delegates 
from American and Foreign colleges 
and universities will be received, in 
whose honor a luncheon will be served 
at noon. The first performance of 
the "Pageant of New England Rural 
Life" will be given in the afternoon, 
followed in the evening by a formal 
reception by the Governor, the Trus- 
tees and tin- President t 1 delegates, 
guests and Alumni. Tuesday is also 
to be known as Alumni Day, at which 
time class reunions, lunches, etc., 
will be helil. 

[< iiiitlnuiMl nn page 1.1 



JOHN KENDRICK BANGS TO 
READ SATURDAY EVENING 

Noted Author, Humorist, and Reader. 

ThemeB to be, "Salubrities I Have 

Known", and "More Salubrities*'. 

Posters are now about campus an- 
nouncing the coming to M. A. C. of 
John Kendrick Hangs a noted reader 
and humorist. The college will be 
favored with his presence at Stock - 
bridge Hall, Dec. f, at 7-80 o'clock. 
Rangs is one of the leading men in his 
work and the Social Inion committee 
is to be congratulated on obtaining 
him to entertain the student body. 
He has been engaged in literary pur- 
suits for many vears and ut some 
time has been associate editoi of Ll/e, 
of Jliirper's. the Mettnpotitutti and 
contributor to many other magazines. 
Perhaps his best kuowu production 
as an author is "A llonseboat on the 
Styx," though "G hosts I have met,'' 
and "A Proposal under Dilliculties" 
run it close seconds for popularity. 
During late years he has made an 
enviable reputation for himself M a 
reader and "Genial Philosopher" to 
put it in the words of the lndrjniut- 
1 nt of Oct. *.», 1916, Among his well 
known readings are "Daiius Green 
and his Motor-Machine," "Eloping 
with Papa," "The Great Day when 
Matilda voted," ami "Haggs plays a 
system at .Monte Carlo." As an- 
nounced on the posters, ••.Salubrities 
I have met," and "More Salubrities" 
will be his themes, and he can be 

Continued *«n !«**«■ "I 



By Way of Correcting the Sunday "Union" 



The following article was featured 

on tin- front page <»f the Springfield 
f'nimi of Sunday, Nov. 26; 

PENALTY IS REFUSED 

AND WITH IT GAME 

An example of sportsmanship 
rarely seen in competition of any 
kind may have cost Springfield Y. 
M. (. A. college its annual game 
with the Aggies yesterday at Pratt 
field. 1b the fourth period (apt. 
Sermon of Springfield broke loose 
an.l planted the ball on Aggie'i 20- 
yard line. As hews* downed an 
Aggie player used his fist with vici- 
ous intent and so openly that the 
referee couldn't mis* it. He promptly 
imposed the penalty hut Spring- 
field refused it and right there 
passed the last good chance for Y. 
M. C. A. college to win the game. 



To correct the impression given b« 
the aliove we print two telegrams re- 
ceived from the officials of Saturday's 
game. 

Worcester, Mass., Nov. 26, 1916. 

Amherst right end penalised by 
referee for piling on play. Spring- 
field lineman penalized by umpire 
for unnecessary roughness. The 
two penalties were for 15 yards and 
therefore neutralized. No penalty 
refused by Springfield. 

Pi IrCV H. CaHPF.NTKH, 

Referee. 

Bohtoh, Mass., Nov. 27, 191 n, 
Y. M. C. A. did not tefuse penalty 
in fourth period. Penalty was neu- 
tralised by similar offense. 

lb 011 C. McGrath, 
Head linesman 



VARSITY CLOSES SEASON 
IN WHIRLWIND FASHION 

Holds Springfield to 6-6 Score in I bird 
Fought Contest. Defeats Oppo- 
nents at Their Own Game. 

Outplaying Springfield at Its own 
open game, handling the ball cleanly, 
I ami working like a well oiled machine, 
the If, A. C. combination came out 
with a 6-6 tie to their credit in the 
annual wiudiip football came at 
Springfield last Saturday. 

Springfield, coming from | season 
of notable victories and few defeats, 
was in perfect condition and confi- 
dent of an easv victory Until the game 
started. They had not counted on 
the Aggie fight in their figuring, bow 
ever, and noon were themselves flgtll 
ing to keep »»n an eveU footing with 
the maroon jerseved leant. 

Springfield*! noted open play iv:iv 
especially noticealde by its lack of 
success. Aggie men completely 
boxed up the speed v Sermon to nenrlj 
every play, and bis long end rune, 

the favorites in Springfield's \>u< r ; 
tricks, failed to gain substantially :it 
any lime, M. A. C. men get ling in 
rapidly and tackling for losee* 01 
only slight gains. The long forward 
tritees which have often spelled defeat 

for Springfield opponents also failed, 
only one out of the five ti les MM 
ing while of tin- others Aggie im 1, 
intercepted two and spoiled tin >. 

In punting. Pond out-booted Spring 

field on every kick while 1 »;iy ami 
Grayson from then end DOSitii 
Speeded down the field and eitlh 
tackled the receiver in his tracks 01 
broke up the inlet feum ■*■ for some 
other Aggie man to drop (In runm 11 
before be bnd got well undei a 
In the first quarter Springfield 

started on a shoit trip down the field 
with a series of line plunge* wiiii 
Gayie carrying the ball for the l»e»t 
gains, but failed to hold the bull, 
fumbling on the I.'i-vard line Magil - 
nil recovered the fumble of M. A ( . 
and after three downs on rusbil 
Pond punted back up the field. 

Springfield kept up the line plunging 

for short gains ami when the whist li- 
blew for the quarter they bad tin* ball 
on the five yard line when' Agg <• 
held them for downs. Win n 
the second |>eriod opened Sermon. 
with the goal to make, trier! Uj pien ■ 
the Aggie line but fumbled the I<hU 
which rolled over the goal line whin 
Thome of Springfield fell on i! for a 



1 
I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



touchdown. Sermon attempted to 
punt out but his kick was too strong 
and went over his team mateB heads 
which lost him a try for goal. 
Springfield then kicked off to M. A. 
C. and a steady systematic 
march down the field was started. 
When well down the field one of the 
thrillers of the game occurred when 
Sermon for Springfield intercepted a 
forward pasj, but scarcely bad he 
started with the ball when he fumbled 
directly into fullback Weeks* arms, 
leaving M. A. C. several yards nearer 
the goal than when the play started. 
From the 15-yard line Weeks threw 
another forward directly over the cen- 
ter of the scrimmage which was 
snatched out of the air by Pond and 
carried across for a touchdown. 
Captain Grayson's attempt at a 
goal went wild, leaving the score a 
tie at 6 all. 

From this time on, neither team 
scored though several times there was 
opportunity and at leaBt three times 
the crowd came to its feet when it 
looked as if the tie had been broken 
by the aerial method, and not until 
the referee had given a decision did 
the rooters know whether to yell or 
keep quiet. The first of these came 
when Pond, after a series of success- 
ful rushes by Weeks, Whittle, and 
Boles, penalties, and forward passes, 
took the ball on the 35-yard line for a 
drop kick which barely missed being 
a counter. The ball was put in play 
on the 20-yard line and Springfield 
soon punted out of danger. In the 
third period Gayle, playing right end 
for Springfield, got away for a long 
run and Springfield followed this up 
with its only successful forward pass 
of the game which netted 20 yards, 
but directly after this Weeks inter- 
cepted another forward paBS and shat- 
tered Springfield's hopeB. 

The last quarter was filled with 
thrills. In this period Sermon got 
away for the longest run of the game 
and the only broken field run which he 
made during the game. With the ball 
tucked securely under his arm he criss- 
crossed back and forth over the field 
eluding tackier after tackier for a 30 
yard gain. From the 25-yard line 
with Jonannet holding the ball, he 
later tried a placement kick which 
barely went outside the goal posts. 
The ball went into play on M. A. C. 
20-yard line and the last attempt to 
score came when Pond punted to Ser- 
mon who took the ball on a fair catch 
on the 40-yard line and tried another 
field goal from placement. This time 
he failed to get the distance into the 
kick and the ball fell yards short. 
Just as the crowd was getting ready 
to watch a last minute fight similar to 
that which won for Aggie last year, 
time rang down the curtain for another 
season. 
The line-up : 

M, A, ( '. SI'K!I<rOFt«LD 

D H y t re le. Whetstone, Thorne 

Mftjrionin, rt it, Damkruger 

Roberts, rg '«, Webber 

Sauter, HlKfrinbotham, e 

. , Harvey, House 



SpauldinK, Itf 
Holmes, It 
K. Grayson, le 
Whittle, K. Grayson, <jb 
Boles, Whittle, rhb 
Pond, lhh 

Weeks, t'b fb 

Store -M. A. C. I. 

Touchdowns— Pond, Taeww 

— Carpenter of Worcester, 



in, Stafford 

rt, (ireiui 

re, Oayle 

qb, Sermon 

lbb, Juuannet 

rhb, Drew 

Thome, Taylor 

Sprinijtield fl. 

Referee 

Umpire — 



Dorman Of Columbia. 
-McGrath <>t' Boston, 
ule periods. 

Summary of game : 

M. A. «'. 

First down H 
Forward Passes 

attempted •! 

Succeeded 8 
Distance gained H7 yards 

Intercepted '*■ 

I'uutH (number) K 

Ave. distance H4 yards 

Total runbaek 89 yards 

Penalties : * 

Total yards K> 
Touchdowns 1 

Field goals 

attempted 1 

Succeeded 



Head linesman 
linn — 16 min- 



Sl'KI.NOKIKI.K. 

10 

4 

1 
•ill yards 

1 

7 

■J.', yards 
27 yards 

r> 

l 

i 

o 






Director J. S. Jones of the Idaho 
experiment station spent a short 
time inspecting the M. A. C. exper- 
iment station recently. 

PLANS FOR ANNIVERSARY 

1 Continued from page 1) 



Wednesday, Oct. 10, an invitation 
has been extended to the American 
Association of Agricultural Colleges 
and Experiment Stations to meet in 
Springfield and to especially spend 
this day at the college, during the 
morning of which the future of the 
land grant colleges will be considered. 
Following this a luncheon will be 
served, after which it is expected that 
one of the most prominent men in the 
country will give an address at the 
outdoor mass meeting. A second 
performance of the Pageant will fol- 
low this addresB. 

It is expected that a history of the 
college will be in book form by the 
time of the Anniversary, as it is well 
under way at the present, and the 
compilation of the bibliography of 
booka and pamphlets prepared by the 
members of the Faculty, both past 
and present, and the Alumni will also 
be ready for circulation. 

Mr. Wm. C. Langdon, master of 
the pageant, which will doubtless be 
one of the outstanding features of the 
celebration, will arrive in Amherst 
early in December for the purpose of 
taking up active work in ita organi- 
zation. He will remain in Amherst 
until his work is completed next 

October. 

The celebration will be such that it 
will hold no meager place in the an- 
nals of Aggie'B history, which justi- 
fies the slogan, "Every Alumnus back 
in 1917." 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 

FOR -generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

Society Brand Clothes 

Free delivery to Amherst of 
any purchase — large or small. 

JORDAN MABSH COMPANY 

Boston 




Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-M p. m. Sunday and 
other hour* by appointment. 

Croysdale Inn 

BOOTH HAIM.KY. MAWS. 

Thanksgiving Dinner-1 P. M. 

TAIU.KS KKSKIiVKD. 
Telephone 2B»*-W. Holyoke. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Mas* 

FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 



Cox Sons & Vining 

7i Madison Ave.. New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER8Y AND CHOIR 




JOHN KENDRICK BANGS 

[Continued from p«e ll 

counted on to make everyone who is 
privileged to bear him, remember the 
day with delight. 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. K*««Mliw»tts 

IUB0PEAM PLAN 

TfcS Best I'lire to 1Mb* 

All Hindi of Sea f Mi 

Speete! luncheon from 1141 to J p. m. 

—k la cart* eer**** — 
6*30 a. a. to 11*30 f. m. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prtp. 



FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Grown liy the Floricultural D*pt« 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stort 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and swee 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON TME CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING H 



Club Breakfasts. 25c lo 75f 
Business UN'S LMftNi. 60e 
Sunday Table d'Hote H* ^ 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mg'- 



WEEKS CHOSEN TO PILOT 

FOOTBALL TEAM OF 1917 

Ha* Played Fullback lor Two Years. 

Chapman Manager. Seventeen 

Letter Men. 

Roger W. Weeks was elected foot- 
ball captain at the annual banquet in 
the Cooley Hotel, following the 
Springfield game Saturday. 




Harry Higginhothani, Taunton 
Charles H. Hagelstein, Dorchester 
Walter A. Mack, Springfield 
John M. San tor. Turners Falls 
Francis G. Edwards, Beverly 
Richard h. Holden (mgr.), Haverhill 
James II. Dav, Hatfield 

1918 

Roger W. Weeks, Hyde Park 
Robert P. Holnieb, Wakefield 
Oliver C. Rooerts, Rosbury 
Lewis W. Spaulding, So. Hingham 
Forrest Grayson, Milford 
William I. Goodwin, Haverhill 

1919 
Clarence P. Whittle, Jr., Weymouth 
Allan L, Pond, Hollistofi 



SOPHS DEFEAT FRESHMEN 

IN INDOOR RIFLE MATCH 

The sophomore class coutinued its 
excellent indoor rifle team success of 
last year by defeating the freshmen 
in an exceedingly close contest, shot 
during Friday and Saturday, by the 
score of 488 to 487. As far as 
actual scores are concerned the re- 
sults are below those of the past 
year, due to a different method of 
centering the targets, but the match 
was none the less interesting, being 
in doubt until the final score of the 
first five high men of teams of ten 
were totaled. The winning team 
and manager are eligible for class 
numerals. 

Summary of points : 

1019 

(a! latum, V. de I*. '••'■» 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made 
Shirts, made especially for college men, from $1.50 to $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 »P- 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Keady-to-wear Clot lies for young men from Atterbury System-Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Made-to-your-measure Clothes, from $25.00 up. 

Mr. Campion personally superintends to fitting in 
this department and is an expert in the business. 

Oni Of thk Hkst CUSTOM Tailoring Departments in the Staii 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS GLOVES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



Captain-elect VfMEEt 

Weeks "prepped" at Hyde Park 
High School but played no football 
there. He was in a few games dur- 
ing his freshman year at M. A. C. 
Last year he won his "M" as full- 
back, in which position he was the 
star of many games. He is presi- 
dent of the junior class, and a mem- 
tier of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. 
I he team will be managed next year 
by John A. Chapman '18 of Salem. 



Tayl«»r. K. B, 
MnilcMin, C. <;. 
MaHord, I. I». 
Peck . I • N 

T<»( m! 

Ilumlin, II. W 
Stile*. W. U. 
Uoliiiwiiv, .1 W, 
Webster. If, F 
\\un>. It, 

total, 



iwu 



UN 

1*7 

07 

M 

ir? 

\«\ 

4K7 




Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



Mana«er-ele<t Chapman 

The 17 men winning a football 
M" this season are as follows *. 

1917 

1 • y K. Grayson, Milford 
tt 8, Boles, Dorchester 



BASKETBALL 

(.Continued from page I] 

Real basket! tali practice will start 
Dec. 4, with the following schedule : 
Monday afternoon at M0 ; Tuesday 
at 8-80 ; Wednesday evening at 8-00 ; 
Thursday aftermion atA-OO; Friday 
at S4W and Saturday at f-00, The 
position of captain is open. He will 
probably he elected some time in 
January. Basketball suits, made to 
measure, are expected after Thanks- 
giving. The cowl will l»e lined out 
and part of the ceiling removed dur- 
ing the week end. 

There will also be ■ freshman 
team with an outsidt schedule. 
The first freshman practice was held 
Monday evening with about 16 men 
out. A freshman training table will 
be started after Thanksgiving. 

iDterclass basketball will be con- 
tinued as in former years. Kacta 
week a list of men for the varsity 
and freshmen squads will be posted. 
All men not on this list will be <dif»- 
ble for the IntereUas games 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

rK)R forty ye*» we have tendered faithful ierrice. For forty 

* ytttt we have tried to «**« each year'a tenriea more newly 

ideal Thri untiring effort ha» butft for us not only The World" • 

Large* Mad Order Seed Burine*. but alto • World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and undiiputed leaderdiip. The 

Fortieth Aanriwary Ed*i« of Burpee'. Annual, «*• 

'Leading American Seed Catalog" n brighter and 

better than ever. It ii waded free. A pottcard will bring «. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE It CO., Seed Grower*, 

Philadelphia 



logs 



F*«s:e f « Shoe as 

Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
»t-t Repalrfnr-Be-it leother iiaed 



m 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 






1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
hv tin- Btudentg ol the Massachu- 
setts A irriiul t nial College* 

BOARD OF F.DITOlts, 

KICIIAIIK W SMITH '17, Kdttnr-ln-Cbtef 

MAKSH/U.l.o. I.AM'HRAR'IB, M'iflnv Editor 
M1LFORU 11. LAWRENCE "IT. Aul»Unt Editor 
WILLIAM SAVIL1.E. <H< *1". Alumni Editor 



ISSOI I .VI K EDITOR*. 

.TOILS I. hl/KK Ml 

JOSEPH ¥. WHITNEY '17 

PRANK .1. BIKKB 'M 

V \T1IAN W. (MLLETTK M» 

KI.IOT M. BOrPUJft '19 

MVItTON F. EVANS '19 



I ; l rS I N ESS l » EPA I ttU ENT. 

MKKKILL P. WAKNEK'17. Kuainess Manager 
JAMI.S I I'nW KI.L MS, 

Assistant Business Manager 

BTROEB K ROBRQUIRT If, 

Advertising Manager 

Subscription tS.OO |>er year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all order*, paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In caae >'i change <>i address, rob* 
surlbera will please notify the baatnees 

tn :ii i :i : ..' t i- glion M possible. 

Entered as iwnml -class matter at the Amherat 

C.gl llllir.- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped In 
at -the roi.i.KoiAM office or banded to Nathan 
W. litllette IS on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each issue.] 

Ti knday, Dec, 5 

ii-:iO p. M,— Glee Club rehearsal, Old 

Chapel. 
8-80 P. m— Orchestra rehearsal. Social 

Union. 

Wkdnkhhay, Dm . (i 
ii-4. r ) P. m. — Mandolin Club Rehearsal, 

Social Union. 

7-0(1 P. m. — Agricultural heoiiotnies 

Club. Boom B, (lark Hall. 



Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Nov. 28. Mo. 9 



Till Cm i i:<;ivn board regrets to 
announce the resignation of Edward 
\ .Mitrheiris who lists left college. 
Mr. Mitchell ba« been one of the 
associate editor* since March of last 
vein. The vacancy created lev his 
resignation will be Riled from eligible 
members of the class of 1918 entered 
in the present competition. 



Win n i team working undei new 
coaches ami handicapped by the loss 
of nine letter men can come through 
with the record which ended Satur- 
day at Spring Held, Aggie men every- 
where can well afford to feel proud 
Of the old college. A mere compar- 
ison of games won and lost, of points 
fo? and against, fails utterly to show 
the real gamenessof the players under 
staggering oddi. Harvard, Dart- 
mouth, Cornell — these are three which 
few colleges of Aggie's size even 
dared to Fa*t, to say nothing of their 
ever having any hopes for victory. 
It takes a team of real sportsmen to 
lose graceful!* and come up all the 
harder for the next game. We turn 
back to thank Dr. Brides for that 
Spirit of sportsmanship which he in- 
stilled into Aggie men for four years 
and which still lives stronger than 
ever. To the Aggie coaches who 
took up the Job where he left off and 
carried it to such a successful con- 
clusion we extend the thanks of a 
grateful student body. 



TRACK PRACTICE 

Manager Flint *17 of the track team 
bus JHsuetl a call for candidates for 
mdoor practice to start Dec. 1*2. A 
tentative program of meets has been 
arranged* as follows: Hhode Island 
State, W. P. I. at Worcester, Trin- 
ity at Hartford and New Hampshire 
Male. 



COMMUNICATION 

To the Koitok of the Collegian : 

The writer, who has expressed 
very few ideas publicly during his 
first three years of college life, but 
who has spent considerable time in 
studying certain phases of that col- 
lege life of which he has been a part, 
thoroughly agrees with the statements 
made in the editorial in last week's 
Colleuian concerning the existing 
order of things relative to fraternity 
life and the mission of the Commons 
Club. Having in mind the same pos- 
sible solution of the problem referred 
to in that editorial, he would like to 
apply it to other problems which are 
confronting us today. 

The writer is a non-fraternity man, 
but, one who feels that he under- 
stands in a measure at least, the am- 
bitions ami present goals of the fra 
ternities. He bases this statement 
on actual conversations with frater- 
nity men. If his observations are 
untrue, he is perfectly willing to stand 
coirected. 

Since the object of this communi- 
cation is to suggest a better form of 
student government, it would be well 
to review briefly the seeming limita- 
tions of our present system. First, 
a couple of criticisms of the Student 
Senate, which one hears quite often 
in small groups but never in the 
Forum. Looking back over a series 
of Senate elections, the writer has 
heard it said that certain men had 
become members of the Senate as an 
appreciation for services rendered on 
the athletic field or in other lines of 
college activities. This could be in- 
terpreted to mean that perhaps the 
Senate was slowly becoming a sort of 
honorary fraternity or .Junior and 
Senior society and not the Student 
Governing Body. Still others have 
said that the Senate does assert it- 
self as much as should become such 
an institution. There must he some 
reason for this — either it is "sour 
grapes" or else the conditions stated 
must actually exist. 

Today an organization feels proud 
to have among its numbers a mem* 
her of the Senate ; if it has not, 
••something must be wrong." Follow- 
ing out the sentiment of the sugges- 
tion in the editorial, each element 
would be recognized, each element 
would be duty bound to send those 
men who would be frank, who would 
have the courage of their con vie ions, 
and who would always have at heart 
the best interests of Old Aggie. 



If it can be intimated that we are 
tending toward self-government, then 
perhaps these thoughts will help to 
usher in the time when it will prevail. 
The writer would suggest in closing 
that it might be well to let the senior 
honorary societies recognize a man's 
capabilities of leadership and super- 
iority in college activities but let the 
men who know each other best choose 
their representative to that body 
which should create public opinion 
and enact such legislation as will 
make for a bigger, better and more 
democratic Aggie. 

I), o. M. 



ALUMNI COACHING SYSTEM 
HAS WORKED SUCCESSFULLY 

Team Has Done Well Under Hard 

Schedule. Two Wins, Two 

Ties, Four Defeats. 

With the beginning of the football 
season of 1916, there was inaugu- 
rated at Yale, as head line coach, a 
man who had striven for four years 
to put an Aggie team in its proper 
place in the football world — Dr. 
Brides. He succeeded. And hav- 
ing kicked his goal he went off to 
seek bigger work, leaving the Aggie 
team to Aggie coaches. The work 
he left was bigger to them than his 
new undertaking was to him. With 
his going most of the team's shining 
lights went, too, and left but four 
"M" men around which to build an- 
othet team. Such was the proposi- 
tion staring in the face Melican '10- 
Palmer MO, and Perry '16, the 
alumni coaches this fall. 

Doubting Thomases were occa- 
sionally found, but as a whole the 
students supported the new system 
whole-heartedly. Out of raw ma- 
terial the coaches whipped into 
shape an eleven, "a new team, the 
child of a new coaching system," as 
one of the dailies pertinently re- 
marked, which knew how to light, to 
win, and lose, like men. Yet, they 
were beaten, and badly too. But 
who were the victors? Dartmouth, 
Harvard, Cornell — colleges with a 
student body of from three to five 
times as large as that of M. A. C, 
from which to select eleven men ; 
colleges in which an old and tried 
coaching system was established ; 
colleges represented by a consider- 
able number over four veterans. 
But whoever saw the Aggie spirit 
and grit come to the surface under 
overwhelming odds in the Dartmouth 
game and watched the Aggie men 
take their punishment is proud of the 
1916 eleven. 

M. A. C. had no trouble defeating 
Connecticut Aggies or Worcester 
Tech. Of course they were compar- 
atively easy, but are they not col- 
leges of our own size? Imagine 
Williams, or any other similar 
college in New Kngland facing, 
with new coaches and only four 
veterans, a football schedule on 
which appear such a combination as 
Dartmouth, Harvard, Cornell, Tufts. 



Harmony 

It has become a point «>f good 
fellowship, and he that will re- 
fuse to take a pipe of tobacco 
among his fellows is accounted 
peevish and no good company. 

See the 

Harmony Keg of 
Good Fellowship 

—at— 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



INDISPUTABLE PROOF OF 

THE BETTER QUALITY OF 

DEUVAL SEPARATED CREAM 



The most important of ail butter-scoring 

contests are those that take place at the 
National Convention at the National Kutter- 
npiikers* Association, held In reecnt years in 
roniutirtion with the National Hairy Show. 
The tirst prize winners at every i onvention 
of the Association since Its organization in 
tSVX have all heen lie Laval users. 

Such evidence of the superior quality at 
i- 1 cm in produced by the l»e l.;t\ ;il < ream Sepa- 
rator no row owner cihi- 
sirterinit the purchase of 
• i-reani separator <;.n 
afford to overlook. 

To proiliK-e liiuh untile 
butter you miist have* 
fine quality of Bicai 
,intl to get the best 
i ream you must have a 
lie Laval I ream Bepe 
tor. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 




tSS IU:>> kl>« \ \ 

\i;w VORK 



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CHICAOO 




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DOUBLE SERVICE 

Automobile- Tires 

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Absolutely Punctureproof 

^DemNs 8ert*t*Ttr*$ aw mads 
double the th Ickneas of UM oert 
make tires. 



i naturally gives that rotten 
more miicajje and sorfico. Th» 
average of II miles of tough 
'fabric and one Inca sorface tread rubber 
makes these tires ab*oHlr>vpuneturrprwf. 

These Urea excel all others. for ass la the 
country over roast and rugged roads as well 
as on hard pavements. They areas easy riding 
and rest Uent as any other pnenmatio Ure-Uie 
air space and pressure being the same. 

They are the most eoswii i cal awl "ears ttm 
tires madeandaro used where tires must bo <S«- 

Knded on and 1 1 re troubles cannotbe tolerated ■ 
inyZ»ouW«S#riHc« stylo tlrcsarelnuselntlie 
U. S, government and Kuropean War serr Irs. 

Our output is limited toaeertalB i — 
for a abort time we offer the folio * _ 
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PRICES 

80x3 In. 18.00 Um 
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Stearin. H.TI «3§ 
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AD other ilses not Included In abova list 
also furnished. Nun-skids st 10* addUIaBa'. 

Terms: Payment with order a* abovefpeosi 
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two or aiore tires. m& 
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Then the Springfield game. He- 
fore M. A. C. went down to that 
City the papers had the Training 
School heatiug them at least 20-0 in 
the first half. The game ended in a 
6-6 tie. Newspapers came out with 
remarks such us "another surprise 
to old man Dope," "Springfield is 
lucky to get away with six points," 
uml the like. The old man Dope 
mentioned w»s no relative of "the 
sod-busters, hv hickory !" Thev 
knew there would he no such score as 
prophesied. 

During the season M. A. C. lost 
four games, tied two, and won two. 
They scored 25 points against their 
opponent* 1*0. Dartmouth made 
SI and Harvard 4 7 of these. A«»ie 
loses according to points. However, 
there are two lines in an old poem 
which go like this : 
"ll isn't the foci that yoii'io licked lh.it 

counts, 

Bui boa <iiil .v-u tio|,i, ,.,,„i w |i>. ' 

A few short summary expressions 
ma) serve to refresh the memory. 
Connecticut Aggie game— "M. A. 
C.'a goal line never in danger;'' 

Dartmouth game — "M. A C out- 
classed ;" Harvard game — "M. A. C. 
fought gamely and Harvard often 
forced to kick;" \V. p. I. game— 
"W. P. I. outplayed in hard fought 
<.':mio ;" Tufts game — "Tufts wins 
On forwards. Aggie's defense ex- 
cellent;" Williams game — "M. A. 
C. outplay Williams, hut are forced 
to a 0-0 tie on 100 yards penalty;' 
Cornell game — "Aggies come back 
in second half with surprising 
strength;" Spiingfield game — 
"Springfield is lucky to get away 
with six points " Not had at all. 

In brief the results of the ■eaaofl 
are as follows : 
V ».C. 12 < ..mi, Ao^i,., (J 

Mariiiioiiili |g 

• i Harvard 47 

7 W. !'. 1. ii 

it Tufts 

ti Cornel I :I7 

N|.rinu|jel,| ii 



The Massachusetts CoUegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



WASHINGTON CLUB DINES ECONOMICS MEETING DEC. 6 



Dr. E. W. Allan '85 Toastmaster. Pres- 
ident Butterfield Discusses 
50th Anniversary. 

In c«iiiiiectioii with the Washing- 
ton meetings of the Association of 
American Agricultural Colleges and 



A regular meeting of (be Kconom- 

ics Club was held Wednesday even- 
ing iii Clark Hall with "Farm Labor" 
as the main topic of discussion. 
Creditable and Instructive (en minute 

talk* were gives bv S. s. Smith, II. 

11. Millard, F. M. Gtffurd and T. K. 



Experiment stations and related or- Center who respectively combined the 

ganizations. the !\l A. C. Club u f subject with fruit, general I aiiii'iiui. 



Washington held a dinner at the 
Hotel Kbbitt on the evening of Xm. 
16. Dr. B. W. Allen '*;, RC tofJ as 

toastmaster. 

President Rutterfield discussed a 
number of aspects of college life, es- 
pecially the proposed mO celebra- 
tion of the 50th anniversary, He 
urged all alumni to make a special 

effort to he present. 

Profs. Brooks and Koord and Pre* 

ident W. K. Stone 'H-J also spoke 
briefly. 

The greetings Of the club were ex- 
tended to the Washington ( luh of 

the Michigan Slate \ U 'i Iciillm al 
College, which was oi\ino ; , dinner 
in honor of the visiting alumni. 

Those in attendance were as bil- 
lows: President hutt. ificld. Prof, 
Brooks '7.'», Koord and Paige 'SJ, 
and 1*. H. Smith '!l7 from the col 



effect of immigration, and dairying, 
discussing their topics along the lines 
of total labor required, distribution 
over the \ear, type of labor, wages, 
ami accommodations. The next meet- 
ing will be held Dec. g, at 7 i . m. in 
Clark Hall when Mr. Kutledge of the 
economics department will nhe. 
through the courtesy of the American 

Harvester company, an illustrated 
lecture on the "Development of 
American Agriculture." 



THE 



CUPS AND MEDALS AWARDED 

Judders Again First tit Biocktou. 
The stock judging team which rep- 
resented M. \. c. at the Brockton 
Fair and National Dairy show in 
Spiingtield this year were presented 
with cups they won at these places 

in the Wednesday asscinhlv, Nov. 



United States Hotel 

lieacli, Lincoln Bad Klnitston Hts . 

BOSTON, r\AS>$. 



onl\ two IiIim ki- toon South Terminal Hlu 
lion. and eastl) reached frota North station 
bt Klevated KitllwMv.and convenient alike 
ti. the great ratatHshoysand business centre, 
aisn to the th sat tee and places of Interest 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Tali ie ami servlrr unsurpassed, 
tlook let utoi wart sent uima application. 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Prcprletor Manager 



21. Cold medals wen' also given 
lege; W. H. Betl, honorary mem* Charles !1. ('lough '17, of Dedham, 
her; Dr. .1. L. Hills '81 ; Pre*. W. >»nd Samuel V. Noyea'17, of (Jeorge- 
E. Stone '83; Dr. K. W. Allen *«5 U owo » •* Aral prise judges al Brock- 

and Mrs. Allen; Prof. K. S. Coolev '""• 



'**: Dr. H. I.. Martwell »8» ; K. P. 



In the Cotl mi i\ ..ft let. Hi it h.is 



Sellero'89; G. A. Billings ':».". and "'•''h'" 1 Ibal this yesr was the tirst 

time in biston when an Agjiie team 

has won tiist prise at Brockton. 
This statement is not stricth In ac- 
cordance with the facts, and in fair- 
ness to Professor M< Lain and the 
members of the team it should be 



Mrs. Billings; Dr. W. A. Hooker 
Wi sf. W. Kellogg 00; H. I. 

Knight 02 and Mrs. Knight ; W. \ . 
Tower "Oo ; ('.. T. French '<u; ; II. V. 
Baker '11 and Mrs. Bakei ; H. V. 
Clay '11 ; ami A. H. Russell 'N. 






26 



ISO 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 



Mr. Fred B. Smith of New York 
Sounds Keynote of Success. 

"The difference between success 
and failure in man is the difference 
'etween accent," was the main 
thought of Fred B. Smith of New 
Terk t ity at Sunday chapel. Those 
of tbw mentality and lack of social 
•ffibiuou will make a success by em- 
phasiEing important things while one 
whose character is breaking down, 
fails. 

1 Ite time has come when the man 

of *uperb character pushes to the 

fr "iit.forin these days doubtful prin- 

'-- felH in thestrainof opportunity 

ar »»I triumph and with it vanishes gen- 

Strength of mind and motive 

■ footed m religion of which we 

wwW not lie afraid for we owe 

« v m thi„g on earth to Got! and it is 

y to pass things on a little 

"^tei than we received them. 



ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

OFFERS NEW COURSES 

The change of schedule in force 
for the first time this year, by which 
arrangement the sophomores aie able 
to begin tin- study of entomology « 
year sooner than was possible under 
the former, makes ii possible for the 
department to offer to the Upper 
class men courses which have hereto- 
fore been left to graduate work. The 
proposed courses which enter the 
curriculum next rear, and which will 
lie given in ■ small way to the pres- 
ent seniors, are insect photography, 
identification of larvae, and a course 
in forms related to insects, Cuder 
the latter course will be given study 
of forms such as rnite«, ticks and 
closely allied forms which t\o not 
properly come under « classification 
of insects, but with which the prac- 
tical man should be familiar. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

(m xkI work speaks for itself. 

NASH BIOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Itooks Fountain Pens 

Mrenti t-.i i:.-, i ppewrttar 

F. M. CDRRAIM C.'F. t)VI « 



noted that M. A. C won (list place 

at Brockton fair in the fall of 1914 

The team at that lime included 
Philip F Whittnore. I. Samuel 
Moberg, and Russell W. Harvey, of 
the class of 1 !*!.*>. 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUOS anij cakpf:ts 

i i.\i \i;>*ii KBTA1 1. 

KnTiai,i»iii mlri 

Stiiiikv LaNKFoIVSKS, Inc. 

M*Nf'rA«*I'tIMIN,j jr.WKI.MI> 



1KM llltOA IIWAV. 



:.i;w vomk 



CONFERENCE on MARKETING 

Of ihe most vital concern will br 
tin fourth National Conference on 
Marketing ami Farm ( redit at 
Chicago Dec. 4th to nth when over 
two million American farmers, live 
sud dairy stock producers and feeders 
will be represented by delegations. 
This year's conference is to he par- 
ticularly devoted to n discussion lead* 
iiig tO a solution for cheeking the bil- 
lion dollar agricultural loss especially 
in the giain market and also to t In- 
work ing out of the next definite steps 
in rural cretin legislation. 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

ilur ^pecliltv — Anrt BttlBl good thing* to est. 

MRS. L. M. 5TEBBINS, 



<i.l M AMI CIlM.KliK 

i'ins a nii unseat * 

ISftl.O, SI! VBH *"»»* IIHilv/r „»„,,, 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

v.* locatad <.*>-i p„%t ..iiirr t ,, „„» n lt ,),, 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specially 

literal ficfac Sf Hsjb i»i e. m 

College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



Mr, Alfred F,Muller*12 of the office 

of .John N'oleu, Landscape Architect, 

Cambridge. Mass.. is now acting 

manager of the Kenosha Homes 

Company of Kenosha, Wisconsin, 

and is interested in a striklug real 

estate development at that place. 

,.,, _l * #n i i .... A Church home of ihf li!>er»l t'ailh 

Ihe work » fuliy ofttyned iu sn « u where every ItU(jrlll „,! meet 

arlicte by Mr. Fuller ia a recent with a cordial welcome, 

number of The Amtrimii Cdy. j riouiak sirjtuav ^bkvicmt: i-. m 



Middle street, Hadley.MHa, 

if l. 415-W 



UNITY CHURCH 

NORTH Pleasant St. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

iu,yj07 H i«ii st. 

- — SKI.LS 

Hart Schaffner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holynkc and see nur 
big store. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculirts* Prescription. Pilled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Keplaced. bine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 

TO PLAY MICHIGAN AGGIE 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

lobbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
ind Fittings (or Steam, Water and Ga», VsbMtOi 
and MlfMUl Boiler and Pip* Covarlsga, I W 
Cut to Sketch, Mill MJppHes. LriRii eet •. and 
Contractors for Steam and Ho* Water ""tin*. 
\utoniatlc Spr.nkler Systems. Bmle. and I hngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 



E.B.DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

office Hour* 9 to 12 a.m.. ISO to ft p. m. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes **"ȣ *t*" 
blocks from the Union Depot, w a m.der n hos- 

W Tn the European Plan It to just , step 
rom Main Street, away from the noi* and dust 
tnd vet in the center of the business distort. 

Us rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
hating a telephone and hot and cold running 
w* ter in ^ every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath (siiiRlel • !.»•» and up. 

Itsenceilent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant "*morv-«ver*- 
thing of the highest quahtv. well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staving there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

Hleh1«n<l HflM. S|.rln K H.l.L M«««. 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

IIKMIY K. Will I I. 

Ml MAI" Urion. N..i:rMVMii..> 

Mandolin.. Oenuine Hawaiian Ikulele.. llrka. 

Utrlima, etc. and mu.ir for all Hictnim-nts a,,.) 

i.11 voices. ln»tni»««t« may t*> Im.l M trial 



ItlJCKMAX'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



" II AMP •• 



Negotiations on lor Game with M. A. 
C. at Opening of Anniversary Week. 
Professor Hicks left Sunday for 
Michigan Aggie where he will negoti- 
ate with the football association of 
that college for a place on their 
schedule next fall. If plans go 
through the game will be played on 
Alumni field, Monday, Oct. 8, 1917. 
This will be pushed as an intersec- 
tioual contest similar to that between 
! Michigan and Syracuse. It will be 
I the big attraction on the opening day 
of the 50th anniversary. If a date 
{cannot be arranged with M. A. C 
I Professor Hicks will enter into negoti- 
ations with Penu State for a game ou 
that date. 



Seniors and Juniors 

\'<»w is the time to 
buv those 

FILING CASES 

For y<»ur Hulk-tin. 

Johnson Book Co. 

Babbitt Woobworth 

\l].ha Siuiiia 1'hl llims,-. 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS \NI) POULTRY DRESSERS 

V> HOI K.» VI.K OM.V 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Ham*, Bacon, Sau 
sages, Poultry, flame, Butter, Cheese, 
Pggs, Olive Oils. 



OSTROLENK 11 DIRECTOR 
OF NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

An example of one of oui most 
successful and progressive alumni is 
illustrated by Mr. liernhardOstrolenk 
of the class of 1911. A Russian by 
birth he prepared at the National 
Farm school at Doylestown, Pa. com- 
ing to M. A. C. from there. Upon 
graduation he became professor of 
agriculture at the Canny State high 
sthool in Minnesota where he haB 
done much to inspire better farming 
methods both among students and 
farmers and was looked upon by the 
agricultural department as a most 
valuable asset to the community 
December l he begins duties as Direc- 
tor of the National Farm Behool, an 
institution fur the education of boys 
along agricultural lines and from 
which he himself graduated but a few 
vears ago. 



BISHOP DA VIES TO SPEAK 

The speaker in Sunday Chapel, 
Dec. 3rd, will be Bishop T. F. Davies 
of Springfield. He received his H. 
A. from Yale in 1894, and his M. A. 
degree in 1907, while the degree of 
D.D., was conferred upon him by 
Amherst in 1912. He has been con- 
nected with churches in New York, 
Norwich, Conn., and Worcester. 
On May 10, 1911, he was elected 
Bishop • 

PITTSBURG LECTURES 

Miss Goessmann to Give Series of 
Talks on Cultural Subjects. 
Miss Helena T. Goessmann of the 
Kuglish department has accepted the 
invitation of 100 college women of 
Pittsburg, Pa. to give a serieB of 
three morning lectures. On Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 29 at 10-45 a.m. she 
speaks ou "The Play." Her subject 
for Friday morning "The Quill" 
aud on Saturday "The Spoken 
Mind." Duringthelast 12 years Miss 
Goessmann has been in much demand 
as a lecturer having spoken on educa- 
tional and cultural subjects in .'1 
states of the Union. The course 
she gives in Pittsburg is entirely non- 
sectarian and is the same as the 
special lectures under the Massachu- 
setts University Extension. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



|ili,.-k>,i..n,- \"Hlt an. I N..nl. < .-..(,,■ n,,,.,.u. 
BOSTON, . PIA5S, 




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1913 NOTES 

Joseph A. Macone, the gentleman 
farmer from Concord, attended the 
Springfield game and visited college 
Sunday. "Shorty" was driving his 
new Mercedes. 

"Norm't lark also paraded up and 
down the sidelines Saturday. Paul 
Serex "fussed" the game and AlliBter 
F. McDougall managed to leave his 
milk experts long enough to lie on 

hand. 

••Dud" French of (harlescote Farm, 

Sherborn, one of the few Thirteen 

men who is still single has no claims 

on the matrimonial title, thus he 

writes. 

The Editor of the Thirteen Notes 
would like to receive a few advanced 
notices from some of you old has 
beena. What do you say, Thirteen, 
■ little news. 



CATTLE DISEASE REPORT 

A special report on ihe diseases 
of cattle has just been received by 
the library. This book ia written by 
the Bureau of Animal Industry of 
the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The book contains 56* 
pages, is well written and deals with 
all the diseases of cattle. It is 
illustrated by 49 photos, maay of 
them colored, and 29 cuts. The 
book waa first published in 1892 and 
was revised and reprinted this year 
by an act of congreaa. One hundred 
thousand volumes have been pre- 
pared for distribution, and any one 
may secure a copy by writing to his 
congressman or senator. 









PATRONIZE AN AGGIE MAN 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

« \TISF ACTION (iUAR ANTF; BD 

LARRY GAY, PROP* REAR OF AGGIE INN 



SEEN OH TB% CAMPUS 

quite a number of old Aggie men 
were visitors oh campus after the 
Springfield trip. Among those who 
were here are the following; 
••Heinle" Walker '16. "Herb" Waft- 
den 'Mi ".Jim" Nicholson M6, 
-Skinny" Rogers »!#, "BUI" Brazil 
»lfl, "Jack" Hutchinson , 14,"Charley M 
Moses Mfi. "Ty" Rogers *16, "Sam" 
Bartlett ex* 19. Parker* 14, Sears M5, 
Huntington *16, "Babe" Naah *16. 



NEW EXTENSION AGENT IN 
CHARGE OF PIG CLUB WORE 
A. V. Rice of Raleigh, N. C has 
been appointed agent in charge of 
the Pig Clab Work under the direc- 
tion of the extension service of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college- 
Mr. Riee waa brought np in Cteve- 
land, Ohio, and haa attended the 
North Carolina Agricultural college. 
where he is about to graduate. 

Mr. Rice will succeed Kric N. Bo- 
land, who ia resigning to accept »n 
attractive position with the Quaker 
Oats company. 



SPECIAL TRAIN BCHEDUU" 
To accommodate those who ut 
going home for Thanksgiving, tb e 
special train leaves the C V. s ' 8 
tion Wednesday at 1-00 p. m. ft* 
Beaton. It will return from 
South Station, Boston, at S»4i * • ■« 
Fridav. 



1916 NOTES 

"Question here." Shall the first 
reunion of the class of 1916 be held 
in June or October 1917. All 1910 
men should be considering the ques- 
tion of the date of this first reunion. 
Suggestions, ideas and arguments 
should be sent to the class secretary. 

The following 16 men were in 
Springfield after the game Saturday : 
Mattoon, Potter, Walkden, Flaisted, 
Hall, Rogers, Ray, Brazil, Hart, 
Huntington, Fernald, Murphy, Pal- 
mer, Perry, Moses, Nicholson, Jones, 
Walker and Gould. 

Howard Kelley is assistant in the 
Department of Chemistry. Strang- 
ers on the campus may be interested 
to know that Kei is working in one 
of the few surviving examples of 
mediaeval architecture in this country. 

Sid Haskell is working with his 
father on the home farm in North- 
boro. (Notice to proof-readers : 
For the love of Mike don't leave out 
that with.) 

R. Alson Mooney is farming on 
the eastern front in Plattsburg, N. 
Y., according to persistent rumors. 
Squeeze a verification of this paBt the 
censors, will you, Doc? 

Charlie Moses is helping to run 
his father's farm in Ticonderoga, 
where Mr. Moses owns about 1300 
acres. The manager of last year's 
team came all the way to Springfield 
to see the eleven in action Saturday. 

Some insight into the reasons for 
the exorbitant expense of existence 
may be gleaned from Sax Clark's 
last letter from his office in the 
Maine Fruit Growers' Fxcbange. 
"This concern is something like Doc 
( ance's pet. The California Fruit 
Kxchange. I am working with the 
manager who is a 'live wire' in the 
apple game. Many of the apples 
are to be exported (the italics are 
ours) so we cable direct to London 
and Liverpool our instructions for 
•ties." 

George Ray has returned to the 
campus for advance study in micro- 
biology and ia an assistant in the 
department. 

When interviewed by a 1916 re- 
porter in their luxuriously appointed 
•uite in the U. S. Hotel, they were 
non-committal and refused to give 
out any statement. It was learned 
from other sources, however, that 
they are at present on a still hunt 
and following a warm trail. Gossip 
overheard in the lobby was to the 
effect that they are six-eyed moth 
sleuths in the employ of Dr. Fernald, 
State Nursery Inspector. Reference 
to the register waa made as a last re- 
sort and the names of Dick Potter, 
Pete Mattoon, Dwight Barnes and 
Walker, Babe Naah, and Reg Hart 
ware discovered. The constant nec- 
essity for following new clues makes 
Uie addresses uncertain, but for the 
next few weeks they may be reached 
la care of Mr. R. H. Allen, State 
Board of Agriculture. State House, 
Boston. 



There was a football game Satur- 
day in Springfield, and Perry and 
Palmer were largely responsible for 
the great game Aggie played. Other 
'16 men who were on hand with a 
big boost are Fernald, Hall, Hunting- 
ton, Moses, Murphy, Potter, Plaisted, 
Ray, Rogers, Walkden, (lould.Joues, 
Mattoon, Fisher, Selkregg aud Wal- 
ker. 



EXAMINATIONS ANNOUNCED 

Professor Hasbrouck announces 
that the final examination schedule 
will be posted during the first week 
after Thanksgiving. Last year's 
system will be enforced, each profes- 
sor averaging recitation grades with 
the final examination mark to deter- 
mine the course grade. Freahmen 
should not forget that entrance con- 
ditions should be passed off at the 
condition examination date in the first 
week of January 



TO BUILD HOCKEY RINK 

Work was begun last week on a 
new hockey rink iu the northwest 
corner of Alumni field. The playing 
surface is to be 180 feet by 90 feet. 
In order to insure a better rink than 
last year, the boards are to be sunk 
in the ground about 10 or 12 inches. 
This will prevent the melted ice 
from running off when the sun strikes 
the rink. This is in accord with the 
latest ideas foi building outside 
hockey rinks. 



ATTEND FRENCH DRAMA 
Prof. MacKimmie's class in senior 
modern French drama attended the 
performance of "Le Monde ou I'on 
a'Ennuie," a satire on modern French 
life, by Kdouard Pailleron, which is 
given by the Theatre Francais Com- 
pany at the Academy of Music this 
evening. 



MATHER IN ENGLAND 
Fred Mather ex-'l 7, who enlisted 
as an officer in a Canadian regiment 
last year, is now in England. He 
has been in several training camps 
Btudying trench warfare and expects 
to cross over into France very soon. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•mm.— Fred S. Cooky, director of 
Montana agricultural extension ser- 
vice, was on the campus last week, 
coming here from a meeting of direct- 
ors in Washington. Director Cooky 
was formerly superintendent of the 
M. A. C. farm ami later assistant 
professor of agriculture. 

»04._ Prof. M. F. Abeam has re- 
cently been appointed landscape gar- 
dener specialist on the newly formed 
State Planning board of Kansas. 

*14,— M. D. Lincoln of Brockton 
was on the campus recently. Lincoln 
is doing county agent work in con- 
nection with the Plymouth County 
Truat company of Brockton. Har- 
old Aiken '16 of Millis, is working 
under Lincoln. 




JUST 

A 



TIP 



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This year it's Sheepskin-lined Coats that have a clear field. 
Be sure you have yours before the "big" game; you will look 
fright*' in one oi these Wg roomy coats and you won't know what 
it is to be cold. 

We have the largest line of these coats in the state and all we 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that we 
arc able to oiler you. Ask the man who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 









SANDERSON & THOMPSON 






School and College Photographers . . . 







LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 



Main Office: 

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These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



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E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over 55 Years 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

THE COE-MORTIMER GO. 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



■ y«v.:»v » v «. v.w>v.' . - i *.V i ■■mil 






8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1916. 



TO CIRCULATE BOOKS ON 

AGRICULTURAL SUBJECTS 

Village libraries and people in rural 
communities may now enjoy ail the 
advantages of the great mftM of agri- 
cultural literature in the college 
library according to the arrangements 
made hetween Librarian Greene and 
the extension service. Upon request 
the college will send out small col- 
lections of books upon agricultuial <>i 
allied subjects, to he circulated hy 
the horrowing library. Only the 
latest and hest material will he sent 
and the library will endeavor to com- 
ply as fai as possible with the ex- 
pressed wishes of the borrowers. 
Special libraries will also be made up, 
consisting of books and bulletins on 
special subjects, such as the market- 
ing of fruit, poultry, cooperative 
societies, rural sociology, market gar- 
dening and home economics. Trans- 
portation charges will be paid by the 
borrower, but otherwise the books 
may be had without any expense on 
application to Charles R. Greene, 
librarian, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN PENS 



Offers courses <>f instruction in twenty .seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study oi 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestiy 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Asiiicul sural Chemistry 
Agricultural Kcon^mics 



Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Kconomic Kntoniology 
Microbiology 
Kconomic botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



SEED JUDGING CONTEST 

TO BE IN SPRINGFIELD 

In connection with the show of 
of the Massachusetts State Beard of 
Agriculture to be fold in Springfield 
.Ian. 10, l'.» 17, there is to be a seed 
Judging contest open to competition 
from all New Kngland agricultural 
colleges. This contest has been held 
annually for two or three years and 
has been won by New Hampshire for 
two years. The three men, who con- 
stitute a team, judge seed corn, both 
tliutand dent, Beed and market pota- 
toes, grass and seeds. Besides 
this they compete in the identification 
of grass and clover seeds. Secretary- 
Wheeler of the State Board of Agri- 
culture gives small cups to the indi- 
vidual winners and the agronomy 
professors are planning to give a cup 
t<> the winning team. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Atbletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association. 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
H. E. Bobbins, Mauager 
L. T. liuckman, President 
R. L. Holdeu, Manager 
U. 1). Hawley. Manager 
(). S. Flint, Manager 
hi, 11. Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams, Manager 
I). M. Lipshires, Manager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
I). (>. Merrill, President 
J. H. Day, President 
L. T. Buckman, President 
If. J. McNamara, President 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT 



EDITS POULTRY JOURNAL 

Professor J. C. Graham of the 
poultry department is the editor of a 
new publication in the poultry world, 
a bi-monthly journal containing copies 
of the lectures delivered at the annual 
poultry convention. Although every 
year the Agricultural college has had 
numerous request* for printed copies 
of these lectures lack of funds made 
it impossible to publish them. Now 
the Massachusetts poultry society 
has taken the matter in hand and will 
furnish copies of the proceedings to 
all its members. The journal, which 
contains practical lectures by the 
most prominent poultry men in the 
United States, may be had at io cents 
a copy. Membership in the Massa- 
chusetts Poultry Association involves 
the paymant of a fee of SI either to 
Charles H. Wood, secretary, 715 
State Mutual Life building, Worces- 
ter, or Ralph Woodward, organiser, 
Grafton, Mui. 



Ther. *.<■ Senn 8 -.od K«»*on* why you ihould 
b«f your 

COAL 
C. R. ELDER 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St.. M«onic Bldg,, 
Northampton. Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

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The Connecticut Valley 

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From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt„ alongside the 
famous Bloody brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to Green* 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
»« Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Fails. 

50 Mile* of Trackage Jlodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
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press Service over entire line. 

:3t Railway 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOdlE COLLEQE lor HOI- 
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CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. paat the hour. 

Special C«r» «t »mmmM« RetM 



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Team* will call •▼ery day »l M A i 

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Amherst 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



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High-Grade ColUgt Work 



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l^r.01, 17. A8«t „» 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 5, 1916. 



No. 10 



EIGHT CONCERTS WILL BE 
GIVEN ON CHRISTMAS TRIP 

Musical Clubs Have Several Important 

Dates. Hotel Somerset Dance 

Feature of the Week. 

For the musical clubs the Christinas 
trip comprises the most important col- 
lection of dates on record. There 
are eight concerts in all to he given 
during the trip. 

Because of the shortened Christmas 
vacation it has been found necessary 
to take an addition of time in order 
to make the trip a financial success. 
Accordingly the musical clubs will 
begin their trip on Dec. 27th with a 
concert at the DeMolay Commandery 
Masonic Temple and finish at Fal- 
mouth, Cape Cod, Jan. 2nd, return- 
ing to Amherst on the third, two days 
after the beginning of the second 
term. 

Without doubt the moat important 
concert will he given at the hotel 
Somerset. Governor and Mrs. .Mr- 
Call have signified theii intention of 
being guests of the clubs. Other 
patrons will be Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
K. Hutchinson of Arlington, Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Butterfield of Amherst, 
Mr. and Mra. E. A. Quincy of Alls- 
tun. Professor and Mrs. H. K. Rob- 
bins of Amherst. 

Manager Lipshires feels certain 
that with the good support the lead- 
ers have given in getting their respec- 
tive clubs in shape, the season will 
lie a big success. Besides the regular 
quartet and solo features there will 
be introduced both ukulele and 
banjo-mandolin quintets. The fol- 
lowing is the program that will be 
followed throughout the Christmas 
season. 

Continued on pave » I 

AVIATOR TO SPEAK 



CAST OF EIGHT SELECTED MR. BANGS TELLS OF SOME 



Under Auspices of Social Union. An 

Authority on Aviation. 

Earle L. Ovington, avistor of world 
reputation, will speak on "My Ex- 
periences as a Birdman" in the Audi- 
torium Friday evening, Dec. 1A as 
the Social Union entertainer. Mr. 
< Hiugton, who has won many aviation 
contest! in his Bleriot monoplanes, is 
* writer and speaker of authority on 
aviation. He spoke here last July 
'luring the summer school and his 
speech was so interesting that the 
Social Union has secured him to speak 
to the student body. 



FOR ANNUAL PROM SHOW 

Over Forty Candidates Try Out. Re- 
hearsals to Come Once a Week. 
To Stage Play in Advance. 

Forty candidates reported to man- 
ager Williams in Tuesday's tryouts 
for the east of "The Arrival of 
Kitty" which has just been announced. 

Lewis T. Buckman *I7, of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa., has been chosen to take 
the part of William Winkler, a spicy 
old gentleman, whose principal busi- 
ness is that of bargaining for the 
marriage of his niece. The part of 
Jane, his niece, and the leading lady 
in the play, is taken by Louis P. 
Hastings '19, of Springfield. Douglas 
Newbold '19, of Northampton is 
chosen to take the part of Aunt 
.lane, William Wiuklers* sister, who 
is a maiden lady in hopes of being 
ble»t with the holy bond of wedlock. 
Bobby Baxter, a versatile college man. 



SALUBRITIES HE HAS MET 

Entertains Large Audience with His 
Sharp Wit and Humor. Pre- 
sents Serious Thought. 

Mastery of humor combined with 
a rare artistic ability at painting real- 
istic pictures of prominent men by 
the use of commonplace incidents J a man who, through his literal v 



ROBERT FROST, NOTED 
POET, COMING TO M. A. C. 

Author of "North of Boston" Will 

Probably Speak at Assembly, 

December 13. 

The probable speaker for Wed- 
nesday's assembly on Dec. 18 is 



characterized the lecture of John 
Kendrick Hangs, given iu the audito- 
rium Saturday. Mr. Bangs cer- 
tainly gave the best entertainment 
that has been heard on this campus 
for some time, lie fairly bubbled 
over with humor ami in his serious 
moods he was appealing. 

Mr. Bang* was Introduced by Prof . 
Frank A. Wuugh of the landscape 
gardeniug department. lie gave 
sketches of the following *♦ udulirities 
that he had met" ; Winston Spenser 
( hurchilL Mr. Perkins of Maine, 
Uichai<l Harding Davis, Itudyard 



tin wife of Henrv M. Stanley, Mis. 



is portrayed by Jonathan H. Smith I Kipling, Julia Wurd Howe, Dorothy 
'19, of Koslindale. Benjamin More, 
a bachelor from Italy who has been 
picked as the "young" bride groom 
for Jane is to be portrayed by Wil- 
liam G. Sawyer '18, of Berlin. The 
part of "Ting," the bell l>oy and 
temporary "manager" of the Sum- 
mer Hotel is to be taken by Arthur 
F. Williams '17, of Sunderland. T. 
Palmer Wilcox, of Andover, is to 
serve in the capacity of Sam the col- 
ored porter, while Kitty, the chorus 
girl, is taken by Charles I,'. Wit- 
her, of Walpole. 

Rehearsals are to lie conducted pacb 
week from now on so that the show 
will be ready to put on a few weeks 
in advance of the dale of the Prom. 



work, should l>e more or less familiar 
to the student body. Robert Frost, 
a Califoruinn by birth, graduated 
from Dartmouth iu IHilb* and studied 
at Harvard IftM-Sf. He then be- 
came a fanner for live years and 
during that time gathered much 
of the materiel expressed so delight- 
fully in his rural poems. From 
19<).*»-1 I he was teacher of Knglish at 
Piiikertou Academy at Derrv, N. II . 
and the following year was instructor 
of psychology at the New Hampshire 
state normal school. The following 
three years were spent in Kngland 
and he now is once more ■ farmer. 
Besides his country life poetry be is 



Richard Henry Stoddard (Klizabethj the author of numerous books, 
Barstow), Sir A. Conan Do\le. among which are "A Bov'a Will" 
Andrew Carnegie, John D. Roeke- and "North of Boston," 
feller, Judge Robert (•rant, and Mark 



Twain. Mr. Bangs concluded the 
entertainment by the reading of two 
original poems, "A Dream'' and 
"The Salubrity's Motto 



DEBATING SCHEDULE 

Management Arranging Several In- 
tercollegiate Dates. Freshmen 
to Have Team 



Mamiger Sidney S. Smith '18 of 
varsity debating is hard at 
t work arranging an intercollegiate 
MERRIMAC VALLEY MEN MEET schedule for the coming season. 
The M. A. C. men of Merrimac i Already dates are ending with 
Valley met Tuesday to form a new j ,lliun » od Vermont, with several 
M.A. C. club which includes many "ther eoUtffe under consideration, 
undergraduates and alumni of that Osij off campus debates will be 
section of the state. 



INFORMAL THIS SATURDAY 

The second informal of the year 
will be held Saturday afternoon at 
8-30 in the drill ball. Supper will be 
seised as usual at <> o'clock in Draper 
hall where Manager Fairbanks has 
promised to give quicker service than 
last time. Bosworth's orchestra of 
Northampton will play for the danc- 
ing. The chaperon fioin Mt. II-. i 
yoke will be Mrs. Schaffuer, Rocke- 
feller Hall, while the Smith chaperones 
will lie announced as the men pin 
chase their tickets. The price of 
tickets will be increased to #2 after 
10 i*. u. Wednesday. They may be 
obtained from W. R. Irving, l"> 
South College. 



Officers were elected as follows 



president ; Leo C. Htggins of Ames- 
bury, secretary and treasurer. The 
entertainment committee includes 



arranged tin year. The team is be- 
ing cost-bed by Dean Lewis, Mr. 

Noyes of Georgetown, K» n < ] - »»" Mr - Patterson. 

There will also be a freshman de- 
bating team. Dates are pending 
with Williams freshmen, Williston, 
Holden of Haverhill, I Spriogiefd, and Amherst freshmen. 
Thomas K. Carter of Went Andover, Mr Patterson will act as freshman N(( <)eviBti 



ach. 



Candidates for assistant 



MUST COMPLETE THIRD TERM 
I lean Lewis read at chapel Mon 
dav morning a resolution recently 
passed by the faculty requiring sen- 
iors to be in real deuce at the college 
until the end of the third term In 
order to be eligible for a degree, 
on from this rule will be 



Malclro W. Chase of Amesbury, and OOSkhi. ^'"'«»"« "* ■w n inm permiltel j escep t in extreme oases, 

Richard H. Gorwaia of Newburyport manager of the debating teams have Rm| then oflIv whefJ lhe mmn |lM f , oni 

A committee to draw up a constitu- been called out from the sophomore p)ple(J hit reqllirt . (| hour8 wjth a ^ 

tion and bylaws is composed Of Ms** Tae ^ wiU WOTk on lbe fr « h - .tandard of scholarship. 

Harold P. Boyce of Haverhill. John man schedule. The position of as- ■ 

B Nelson of Newburyport and Leoi»i B t* nt manager will lead to that of Frank E. Hall '19 of Rockland bus 



C. Higgins. 



manager in the senior yest 



pledger! Lambda Chi Alpha. 




I 













The MassachusettslCollegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



FORMER FOOTBALL STA 
PRAISES VARSITY 



We print below i copy ol 
recently received from one of Aggie's 
prominent alumni. 
To the Kimtok or the Collegian : 

1 ara sending you a copy of some 
portions of a letter I recently received 
from an alumnus who was in his day 
one of the l»est quarterbacks that 

Aggie has had : — 

u* * * * Some people may tell 
you that the boys fought like tigers, 
but that will not be a correct view of 
the game. The Aggie team knew 
more football than Springfield and 
showed the results of good coaching. 
I do not know when I have seen an 
Aggie football team that played the 
machine-like football that this team 
did. There were no individual stars, 
but all of them seemed to be welded 
iuto a machine that knew just what 
to do, and went ahead and did it. 

* » * * This is the only game that 
1 have seen this year, and of course 
it is the game that the team was 
primed for and they were in the pink 
of condition. * * * * 

I think that Melicau, Palmer and 
Perry deserve all the credit you can 
give them for turning out that team. 
To buiu it all up » * * the boys were 
really taught football. 

Very Sincerely, 

Hknky B. Moksk." 
It is very pleasing to get a letter of 
this kind from some of the alumni 
who are in a position to appreciate 
the factors underlying the formation 
of a football team, and if more of the 
alumni would, through such commun- 
ications, express their feeliugs in re- 
gard to things athletic and otherwise, 
it might tend to instill into the alumni 
and students as a whole a little of the 
loyalty and spirit that animates other 
college bodies. 

Yours truly, 
George. H. Chapman. 



Sexton of Darien, Conn., Herbert R, 
liond of Dover, Loriug V. Tirrell of 
South Weymouth, George B. Castle 
of Pittsfield, Elton J. Mansell of 
Cambridge, Roger F. Readio of Flor- 
ence, Harold W. Poole of Hudson, 
Kenneth S. Williams of Sunderland, 
Alfred Sedgwick of Fall River, and 
Paul Faxon of West Newton, man- 
ager. 

The Freshmen who pulled ou the 
winning six-man rope-pull team were 
awarded numerals as follows : Ken- 
neth Blanchard of Haverhill, Allen 
Hersom of Acushnet, John K. Dela- 
hunt of Dorchester, F. Harold Hol- 
land of Shrewsbury, Ivan A. Rob- 
erts of South Lee, John A. Crawford 
of Allston, and Donald H. Smith of 
Pittsfield manager. 

Numerals were also given to mem- 
bers of the winning Sophomore rifle 
team. The men who receive them 
are : Victor D. Callauan of Maiden, 
Edmund B. Taylor of Wollaston, 
Charles (1. Mattoon of Pittsfield, 
Irving B. Stafford of Fall River, 
(Seorge N. Peck of Hartford, Conn., 
and Frank E. Hall of Rockland, 
manager. 



ATHLETIC BOARD AWARDS 

THIRTY-EIGHT NUMERALS 

The Interclase Athletic Board has 
announced the awarding of numerals 
to the men playing on the Freshmau 
and Sophomore football teams, the 
Freshman ropepull team and the 
Sophomore ritle team. The ItfO 
football men who received numerals 
are : John F. Carleton of East Sand- 
wich, Richard H. Gorwaiz of New- 
buryport, Philip A. Readio of Flor- 
ence, Milo R. Bacon of Leominster, 
Guy F. Macleodof Lowell, Harry J. 
Taimadge of Great Barringtou, War- 
ren M. Dewing of Kingston, John 
VigezzI of Great Barrington, Donald 
Lent of Maynard, Charles H. Mallou 
of East Braintree, Robert P. Cande 
of Pittsfield, Irving E. Gray of 
Wooda Hole, and Conrad J. John- 
son of Campello, manager. 

Twelve Sophomores got their nu- 
merals for winning the annual game 
with the Freshmen. They are ; Ed- 
win P. Cooley of Sunderland, Adel- 
bert Newton of Pittsfield, Ernest F. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Competitors should turn iuto the 
office time slips for work done there 
Monday evenings, as no write-ups 
made at that time are credited. Oue 
credit is given for two hours ohice 
work. Attentiou is also called to the 
necessity of giving approximate num- 
ber of words and signing articles in 
order to obtain full credit. The 
standing given below is computed 
through Nov. 20. Competitors should 
remember that one-third of the time 
allowed has already passed, and that 
IS points are necessary for eligibility 
for election. 

The following is a list of the com- 
petitors arranged in order of their 
standing. The competition editor is 
responsible for the awarding of points 
on the basis of one point for each seven 
inches of copy accepted. Professor 
Neal of the journalism department 
rates each man on the basis of qual- 
ity. The last percentage multiplied 
by the number of points gives the 
standing. 

L. C- Higgles '1H, 10.94 

A. N. Boweii '19, 10.71 

F. C. Stackpole '1«, 6.48 

A. L. Chandler '1«J, r >.36 

W. S. Sawyer *1H, 6.81 

R. W. Harwood '18, 4.23 

F. Schenkelberger "19, 3.67 

G. N. Peck *19, 3.5", 
E. S. Stockwell M9, 3.45 
P. F. Hunnewell "18, 1.98 
W. W. Robbins'19, .77 
W. B. Loring *18, 20 



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Students' Needs 

FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

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Free delivery to Amherst of 
any purchase— large or small. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

nflu-e Hour*: 1-3, T-8 p. «». Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Mas- 



Croysdale Inn 

BOOTS HADLEY. MASS. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone 8WB-W, Holjfoke. 

Cox Sons & Vining 

7 i Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
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Hoods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 



Northampton 




FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Grown by the l-loricultural Dept, 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone 300 



HEW MUSICAL CLUB OFFICE 
By partitioning off a part of the 
space under the gallery in the old 
chapel, a new office is being made 
for the Musical Clubs and the Y. M. 
C, A. This will give all the room 
in North College, formerly taken by 
the Y. M. C. A., to the senate. 




RAHAR'S INN 



Northampton, MMa*ettM*t» 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Ttw Bert Ftoee to Dine 
AU Kindt «f Ma I««i 

SpwUl luncheon from 11-W to> p. m. 

—A la carta •#*▼*«• — 
6*30a.m. tolloSOa.m. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



M 




The "Nonotuck 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HO fH 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
SNBdiy Tible Ooti Dinner, $1.2$ 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr- 



BASKETBALL CANDIDATES 

START REGULAR PRACTICE 

The first regular basketball prac- 
tice of the year was held Monday af- 
ternoon with a large squad on the 
floor. Most of the work at present 
consists in practice with the funda- 
mentals of the game. As the men 
round into shape there will be two 
regular games a week scheduled be- 
tween the first and second teams. 
Coach Gore is UBWig a system of post- 
ers, placed at conspicuous places on 
the walls, containing points of sug- 
gestion to be kept in mind by the 
players. A blackboard lia- also been 
arranged at the end of the training 
table Hid short basketball talks are 
held after meals The following men 
have reported for the varsity Bquad : 

Forwards — UaUheldcr *19, F. 
Grayson '18, Hawley *18, Irving *I7, 
McCarthy Mil, Fond '10, and Squires 
'17. 

Centers — K. Grayson '17. and Hag- 
elstein '17. 

Backs — Kverbeck '17, Gasser '18, 
Farkhurst Ml), and Sedgwick '19. 

About twenty men have reported 
for the freshman team. The squad 
promises to be light but fast. Those 
trying out for the 1920 quintet are : 

Forwards — Apsey, I,. K. Hall, 
Levine, Lathrop, Richardson, Sled* 
man, and YMgezzi. 

Center — Armstrong, Horn, .lones, 
Hichards, and Taylor. 

Hacks — Beauregard, Davis, Graves, 
l/ent, Littlefield, Oppe, Fhillips, 
Huberts, and Herman. 



COMPETITION CLOSES 
Competition in the girls home 
economics club of the state, run 
jointly hy the extension servici* of 
the college and the state and na- 
tional department* of agriculture, has 
come to a close, prize winners hav- 
ing been announced. The contest, 
open to any girl or boy in the state, 
luts been of three months duration in 
which time fiO hours of work must 
liave been done in order to become 
eligible. The prizes are awarded on 
a hasis of excellence and thorough- 
ness of work in baking, sewing and 
specified housework and are: first, a 
free trip to Washington, D.C. ; sec- 
ond, a week's trip to points of inter- 
est in New England ; third a week at 
the college boy's and girls' camp in 
•lulv. 



UNABLE TO GIVE ADDRESS 
Dr. L, Clark Seelye was unahle to 
attend the Thanksgiving service at 
Smith College for the first time since 
'lie founding of the institution be- 
( uise of his duties on the investiga- 
ting committee. The committee in- 
uBiignting M. A. C, of which Dr. 
Seelye is chairman, held a meeting 
that interfered with hts usual ad* 
'Iresi. 



SPEAKERS FOR THE WEEK 

Sunday Chapel. 
The speaker at next Sunday chapel 
will be Dr. Albert C. Knudson of 
Boston. Since graduation from the 
Fmversity of Minnesota as an A. H. 
In 1898, he has been engaged in many 
studies and professorships at various 
universities. He studied at the 
school of Sciences Boston University 
lS9fi-97 and from which he received 
his Ph. D. in 1900, attended the Uni- 
versitv of Jena and Berlin 1897-98, 
was professor of church history at 
Denver University 1890-1900, profes- 
sor of philosophy and English Bible 
at Baker University 1900-02, professor 
of English Bible and philosophy at 
Allegheny college 1902-06 and from 
which he received his D. I), and is 
at present professor of Hebrew and 
the old Testament exegesis at the 
theological school of Boston univer- 
sity. He is the author of a number 
of books on the old Testament and is 
a contributor to the religious press 
as well as a prominent member of 
various biblical literature societies. 



The Amherst college musical clubs 
i«ve just returned from very success- 

■1 concerts at Mountain Lakes and 
'tMontcisir, N. J. 



1916 NOTES 

Connv Eiehei is working for an 
advanced degree in microbiology at 
the University of Chicago. Address 
is 4 Snell Hall, U. of C, Chicago, 
III. 

After a restful summer in the 
fastness of Milford, Mass., Sims 
Jones is back at Aggie adding a 
fresh supply of knowledge to the al- 
ready large amount which he has 
cornered and kept in storage agaiust 
a rainy day. Address, care of Charles 
H. Greene, Mt. Pleasant, Amherst. 

Besides teaching botany, etc., in 
the Staples High School in West- 
port, Conn., Bill C'oley is coaching 
the basketball team there, and is 
scoutmaster of a troop of Boy Scouts. 
Bill likes it very much. He occas- 
ionally meets Miss Mae Holdeu, who 
is training tender young minds in 
Bill's old high school in Wilton, next 
town to Westport. 

Fine' letter from Heft) Bishop re- 
cently. He is with the Supplee 
Alderney Dairy, Maytille, N. Y., 
and gets in seven days a week of 
honest toil. Mayville is W Biles 
south of Buffalo. Anyone going 
west should make a date with him in 
Buffalo, Herb feels that one of the 
old bunch would be a sight for sore 
eyes. 

Ed Perry Is leaving Dec. 9 for 
somewhere in Idaho to learn the sheep 
business. After a year in the West, 
| he plans to rear these strange things 
i in great quantities on 12,000 acres of 
J New Hampshire land. Pending the 
! publication of his new address. Kd 
■ miy be reached in care of E. B. 
- Dame. 6 Beacon St., Huston. 

Fred Stearns, 17 Bacon St.. New 
; ton. He is helping the city forester 
to keep the extensive forests of that 
. citv in a condition of robust health. 

Charley Fernald has returned to 
J the campus and hs* his graduate work 
in entomology well under way. 



ONE OF CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORES 



We are sole agents for the Reversible Collar Campion Custom Made- 
Shirts, made especially for college men, from $1.50 N> $6.00. 

Crofut & Knapp, also Chase of New Haven Hats, from $3.00 Uf>, 

THE ENGLISH AQUASCUTUM COATS 

Keady-to-wear (lot lies for young men from Atterbury System Fifth 
Ave., from $22.00 up. 

Made-to-your-mcasure (lollies, from $25.00 up. 

Mr. Campion personalty superintends t«> fitting in 
this department and is an expert in the business, 

One of the Best Custom Tailoring Departments in rm Stan 



ONYX HOSIERY 



MARK CROSS GLOVES 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



KNOTHE BELTS 



At 
Amherst 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trooser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



p» 



forty yrart we have rendered f.ttthful trrvire. |<>r forty 

yean we ha*e tried to make each year'» tervice more n»«rly 

ideal, Thw untiring effort hat built for us not only The Wodd'i 

Largest Mail Order Seed ButmeM, but alio a World Wide 

reputation for Efficient y and undUputrd trader drip. J"he 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee' « Annual, fA* 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" i> brighter and 

better than ever. It it fruited free. A postcard will brag tt. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower,, 

Burpee Building* I'hdadelphin 



F*«a:e f » 



hoe Store 



Largest Stock — Lowest Prices 
Kxpei-t Kcpfili'l.-u:— Bent l«3««tlifcrr > t.Mi»<l 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 






, 










The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIA^ 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS, 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O. T.AM'HKA R '18, M'glmr Editor 
MILFORD K. I.AWRKNCE'l-. Assistant Editor 
WILLIAM SAVILLK. .IK. "17. Alumni Editor 



AesnciATK. EDITOBsL 

JOHN T. Iil/KK 11 

JOSEl'H K. WHITNEY 17 
FRANK .1. 1IINK8MH 

NATHAN W. JJILLETTE '« 

ELIOT M. BCrrUM '19 

MYRTON t. EVANS '19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER 17. Itusiness Manager 
JAME8 C. POWELL IS. 

Assistant Kusiness Manager 

HIR..KK R. ROSEQI 1ST IS. 

Advertising Mansger 

Subscription 18.08 per year. Single 
copies, H cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

Iu case of ohftngc of address, sub- 
scribers will please W»««J 'he business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entsred as serond-olass mattsratthe Amherst 
Post Office. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday. Dec. 5. No. 10 



SKNIOi; VS. KA« I LTV RULING. 

The recent action taken by the 
faculty requiring members of this 
years's senior class to stay in resi- 
dence until the end of the third 
term effectually blocks the idea 
of making the new system of any 
great service to the men who have to 
live »'nder it. That the reaolutioa 
permits seniors to leave early if they 
have already made plans to do so 
means next to nothing, for at this 
early date who can tell what opportu- 
nities may present themselves next 
spring? As the faculty have given 
no reason for their decision we are 
free to assume that they consider the 
issue closed in-so-far as this year is 
concerned. It will not be closed 
without protest if we can help it, and 
we hope what we have to say will 
evoke from them either an open state- 
ment of the reasons for their action 
or a change in their attitude toward 
the underlying principles of the sys- 
tem which is now in its first year of 

trial. 

When the new plan was proposed 
last year we saw in it a great oppor- 
tunity for the graduates of this col- 
lege of agriculture to get through 
their collegiate work at a time some- 
where nearly coincident with the be- 
ginning of* the agricultural year. 
There is hardly a single agricultural 
vocation, with the possible exception 
of the sciences, where it it not more 
advantageous to begin work in the 
spring time. Yet now come the 
faculty and say to the senior, "It 
makes no difference whether you have 
finished your required credits, or 
whether yon have a chance to get a 
job at the end of the second erm. 
You must satisfy the letter of the 
law and remain in AmherBt until 
.June." That attitude is the express- 
ion of men who reoogn.M no eassBtial 



difference between an agricultural 
college and an engineering or a clas- 
sical institution. The practical dif- 
ferences are obvious, and to no one 
do they appeal more strongly than to 
the man about to finish his work. 
He sees every agricultural vocation 
making its strongest demands in 
March and April. So far as college 
training is concerned he is ready for 
the job when the first call comes and 
but for the infernal red tape of an 
hide-bound collegiate system he could 
accept the call and come back later 
for his diploma. Alumni and other 
critics of the college are asking why 
it is that so many Aggie men go into 
other than agricultural pursuits. We 
venture to offer as one reason the 
fact that there are so many obstacles 
facing a man at every turn when he 
tries to accept an opportunity which 
is so unfortunate as to present itself 
in March. To turn stumbling blocks 
into stepping-stones is a truly beau- 
tiful ideal, but we fail to see the point 
in wilfully placing quite so many of 
the said blocks in one place. 

We do not make any plea for the 
man who has failed to complete his 
required work by the end of the sec- 
ond term. Neither do we ask that 
diplomas be given at any other time 
than at Commencement in .June. 
Our argument is based solely on the 
grounds of justice to the men who, 
with their college work complete, 
wish to get an early start in the pro- 
fessions they intend to follow. If 
the new system is to be as indexible 
and arbitrary as the old, we won- 
der why it was ever adopted. Cer- 
tainly it is not getting a fair trial 
wheu one of its primary purposes is 
being arbitrarily < efeated by such 
a resolution as the faculty has just 
passed. Who can say whether the 
three term plan is good or bad until 
it has been given at least one chance 
to show its woi kings? Here is the 
first real check it has received since 
its inception. Will the student body 
sit quietly by and watch its nullifica- 
tion or will they demand :i show of 
reasons whv ? 



7-45 p. m.— Concert of Musical Clubs at 
11 ad ley. 



Saturday, D*c. m 

:;-;',() i\ m. Informal 'at Drill Hall. 

mnday, Dae 10 
9-10 i'. M.- Chapel, Dr. Allien 0. Knud- 
son, boston, Mass. 

TUESDAT, Dki , U. 

7-(>o p, it, — Ulee Club rehearsal, Old 
(Impel, 



When going over the •« Mountain " or 
across the " River " why not carry a 

BOX OF LIGGETT'S OR 
ST. CLAIRE'S CHOCOLATES ? 

Always fresh. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

BiBliop Davies Speaks on Generosity, 
Gratitude and God 
"Generosity, gratitude and God 
are three prime essentials of spiritual 
and moral endeavoi," was the main 
thought of Bishop T. F. DavieB of 
Springfield and western diocese of 
Massachusetts at Sunday morning 
services. In the expansion of his 
theme he said in part, "Gener- 
osity is not necessarily the giving 
but iu having that kindly nature 
which adds human happiness to the 
heap of human misery. It is so easy 
with an unthankful heart to forget 
gratitude but a thankful heart appre- 
ciates creation, preservation, and 
divine inspiration. The kingdom of 
God is expressed internally by our 
rnoralB and ideals, and externally by- 
action through the church and 
should be the stepping stone to the 
eternal goal." 



ECONOMICS CLUB SCHEDULE 

An illustrated lecture on "The De- 
velopment of American Agriculture" 
will be given before the Economics 
Club, by Mr. Rutledge of the depart- 
ment of economics, on Wednesday, 
Dec. 6, at 7-00 p. m., in Clark Hall. 
The slides will be furnished by the 
International Harvester Company. 

Dec. 13, the topic, "Farming in 
New England After the War," will 
be handled by Professor Foord, head 
of the division of agriculture. 

Jan. 10, "The Civil Service as a 
Life Work," including a technical 
discussion of Civil Service examina- 
tions, will be presented by the de- 
partment of agricultural economics. 



If you are hungry have a 

SANDWICH AT THE 
FOUNTAIN 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



The REXALL Store 



DE LAVAL SUPERIORITY 

Demonstrated Once More at the National 
Dairy Show 

BITTKR made from cream »ei«rated by 
Oe laval Beiiaratora made the mual 
(lean Bween of all hlKbest awardi at 
the irreat National imiry flbow held In 
Springfield. Mass.. In October. 

In the Whole Milk Creamery Butter « las* 
the hiitheat award wa» made to N. «'. Nelson 
of Grove City. Ha., who ia the uaer of a l»e 
I Aval Power Separator. 

In the Karm Dairy Mutter (law the bUtta- 
Mt award was made to P. II. Robinson of 
Egypt. Mam., bnttermaker on Thomas W. 
l.awBon> famous farm. and for fifteen years 
a I ><• Laval user. 

In the Market t ream t'lass the three big-b- 
est scores were achieved by T. P. Lindsay. 
Southboro, Mass.: Branford Farms. Oroton. 
Conn., and A. S. Harris. Kltcbbum. Mass., 
reapectlvely— all De Laval user* 

Aside from the gold medal and highest 
awards In these important classes, the great 
majority of all other awards and hie-best 
■cores were likewise gi^en to l>e I^aval 
nsera, again conclusively demonstrating the 
superiority of IMS iJival l»lry products. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



Ml B«'iAnwAV 
NEW YORK 



» E. Maih wis St. 
CHICAOO 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped In 
at the CoLLCfliAM eifSM banded to Nathan 
W. tilllett* *1B on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each issue, I 

WKDXKKOAY, I>K . 1 

2-uup, m. — Assembly speaker. Repre- 
sentative (ieorjre ('ham her- 

lain, ftjiriimlii'lii, Mas*. 
7-00 p. vi.— Aaririilliiral Kcoimmics 

Hub. ll.M.m H. r lark Hall. 
Joint meeting with I he Ht or It- 
l»ri.l«t- ("lilb. 

7-OU p. M. -Mandolin f'1nl» laheRMf, 

HaofmJ t"nl<.n, 
H-O0 p. «.— Miinibiolojfv Club, Micro- 

hioloiry building. Professor 

l^Miinis, speaker, 

TiinitMtiAt . Ihk . 7 

f i:. c. m. Musical Hub Ki'liearaal, 
Ml ork bridge Hall. 

7,30 p. «. — botanical Club, t'lsirk Jlall. 
boom K, 

yum ay, lire * 

8-4fr P. M»— Movies, Mt.M-kbrtdge Hall, 



FRESHMEN HOCKEY 

A squad of 85 men reported for 
freshman hockey practice Monday. 
The preliminary work will consist of 
soccer practice to bring the men into 
condition until there is good ice. 
Harding *19 and Mausell '19 will 
have charge of the candidates. The 
season will open the early part of 
January. Dates are being ar- 
ranged with Williston, AmherBt 
High, Drury High, Pittsfield and 
Dartmouth freshmen. 

PURCHASE NEW T»A0TO» 

The rural engineering department 
has a new International Harvester 
Company tractor, 8-16 model, for nee 
in demonstration and class work. 
This new addition to the farm ma- 
chinery is to be used in rural engin- 
eering* courses 77 and 78 and short 
courses. 




DOUBLE SERVICE 
lufoBohllevTiret 




turn Datura] Ijr fires that m« 



ioore mUeaaeaad.feTTice. 
a>TeTaiJ^ry»Ues of 



f fabric taa on J h?ch .nrfaee tresd ro bt»r 
Ureaezeel all otfiersjor •»•.!.«»*• 



eoawrewt 
as on hard pa' 
and resilient i 



Urea eaoet m omore »>• y"_"j7?i 

orer rou«b and rugged roedt ias well 

■ *Tements. They are MeasrrldlDg 

as anr other pneumatlo UrO U»e 





^iggS*^ 



rwTor" *ore^ urea. Ail 

"1 must he y 



personal cbecae 

•ertlBed. 

^hf theae «!••■*• i- 

be ooerlneed of th«lr Tery . 

K If * f . TfttAS 



SerrlceTlreJk' 
Co.. AJUM.O. 



EXAMINATION PERIOD LASTS ONLY FOUR DAYS 

Time of Each Exam to be Two and One Quarter Hours. Will Begin Tues- 
day, Dec. 19, at 7-30 A. M. 



Only four days will be devoted 
to final examinations for the firBt 
term this year. Kach examination 
will last for two hours, fifteen min- 
utes, there being four such periods 
each day. Beginning at 7;W) Tues- 
day morning Dec. 19, the first exam 
will continue until 9-4. "» ; the second 
will last from 9-o."» to 12-10. Resum- 
ing work again in the afternoon, 
the third examination period will ex- 
tend from 1 to 3-15; the fourth, 
from 8-tS to 5-40. The schedule of 
times and places follows : 

IIKSDAV, DEC. UK 
7-30 to ii-45 \. m. 

Sophomore Tactics 25, Drill Hall. 
\nricultural Education 60, s. n. pjg, 
Sural Journalists ho, s. ii. 114, 

i.iimaii ~H, F. H. K. 

9-56 to l-.'-in. 

Sophomore Physics 26, Drill Hall. 
PomoloK) 1 75. \V. H. b. 
SItcrubiologe 51, M. b. 
Mathematics B0, If, b. b. 

1-iHI toS-lfl P. M, 

Krcshtnan Preach i and *, Herman 1 and 

4, Drill Hall. 
Ayn.nomy 75, N. H. 108. 
Floriculture 5:{, F. H. F. 
I'. .nit ry 51, B, H. 114. 
Forestry B0, F. II . II. 
Landscftpe :>t. \\ . n. b. 

:i-^5 to 5-4U r. K, 
Sojdioruore Botany 25. Drill Hall. 
Veterinary Science 79, V. L. b. 

Animal Husluindr.v 75. S. II. 114. 
Kconomtc Sociology 75, F. I.. \. 
Rural Sociology 75. F. b. D. 
Mpanish 60, F. II . F. 
Herman 50, ¥.\\. K. 
French 50, \>. b. It. 
Kn«l|»h 80,8. II. 10*. 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. .'•» 
7-30 to !»-45 \. m. 
N<|.hoin.,re Z.m,I,,u> 25, Drill || a ||. 
Unral Sociology 50, K.b. D. 
Hotany 7H. C.H H. 

Aarirultuinl Education 75, S.H, lie, 

9-65 to 12-10 

Sophomore English H, Drill Hall. 

I*«.ultry 7«, S.H. m, 

BaraJ Kngineerintr 75, S.II. 114. 

UntUeape Gardening 76, W.H i; 

Market Gwdening 76. F.U. F. 

1 l"ini«try51,C.b. I. 

EcwBOBrfai and SocJolotfy 50, F.I.. \. 

s l'ani s |i 75, F.H. K. 

A*ricultur»l KconomicD 50, C.U. A, 

1-00 to 3-15 v. M. 

Hnsfcmga Algebra 1, Drill Ball. 
Wrybtf IT, F.1V. M, 

•'■•Hltry H). S.H. 102. 
Km*. Eng,78, S.H, 114. 

' »'.i„! M ,ry 80, <A„ 



it-55 h, 12-10 
Sophomore Uural Kuginesiins s>. Drill 

Hall. 

Fioriruii are .">u, f. ii. k, 
Hoi any 52, c. II i;. 
Microhiolug) 81 . M. I.. 
Journalism .">::, s. n. 1 1 » , 

1-IM» to 8-16 ,-. m. 

Freshman Bngllsfa 1, Drill Hall. 
Dairy I n« 50. f, I.. \i. 

Hoitituliim- 50, K, II. F. 
Knloiijolu|ry 7(i, F. It. K. 
Malhematii'H 75, \l. b. B. 

\> i.iinaiy 75. V. I.. II. 

French 75. F. II. F. 

Agricultural Kconomics 7ft, C. II. \ 

3-25 i,, 5-40 i'. H, 

Freshman Chemist r] l and 4. Drill Hall. 
Junior Tactics B0, F. b. D. 

KRIDAY, DEC. 22. 

7-3U \u '.1-45 \. m. 

Sophomore Animal llushaodry 25. Drill 

Hall. 
V ii 1 m.\ 5U. S. II. I II. 

Foal try 77, s. 11. |oj. 

Microbiology hi, \\. i,. 

Zoology B0, l B. K. 

Landscape (iartleniu« ii, \V. 11. n. 

•••-55 lo 12-IO. 

Sopbumore Physics Laboratory, Drill 

Hall, 
boiany 50, i . II. \ 

Cberatstrj 7»>, t . f. 
Mtcrobtologj 88, m. b. 

Vfitiinai y 86, \ . I,. |{. 

Journalism 77, 8, 11 , 1 14. 

l-oo la 8-16 i- m 
Fi.-siiman \ ^1 i«uii ni<- and Horticulture, 

fwhere Jali, work mm glveaO 
Soph<»more Drawings!, w. n. b. 
Senior TaeiiesTft, K. b. d. 
Uural Jimrnalism 50, 8. 11. 114 
Botany 55. « . lib. 

3-25 to 5-40 p. H. 

Freshman llygfene, Drill Hall. 
Sophomore Cbemistrj aft and 27. C, L, 

I'i.iiioIoov .Vi, F. II K. 
Fomology 77, \V. Ii. |: 

Any examination n,ii m hcduledtbova 
must be arranged i«»r by individual 
apiMuiitiio-nr wiii, the iMrtructoi h 
chartn "' the ■nbiect. 



ii hematics 70, M.B. B. 
Mi. o.l.iology 50, M.L. 
^'.tiimry 60. Y.L. B. 
Uri,.ii|, ira j foonoHJirBftl, (*,H. A. 
M'Ti.iilture 75, F.H. C, 

3-25 !o ft-40 p. u, 
9mhmm Tartic» 1, Drill Hall. 

THIIISDAV, DEC. 81. 
7-30 to0-4ft a, m. 
N 'lh„ m ., re French 25 and 28, F. U. F. 
s i «N,r,» (ierman m and 28, F. II. F. 



WIN CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

Aggie men captured three of tin- 
prises in the Northampton V. M, I . 
A. cross country ran held in North- 
ampton on Saturday, Dec, §, Louis 
Lyons "18, of Rockland won the race, 
easily leaving the field behind. Thin! 
place went to William J. Sweeny *19. 
of Dorchester, and fourth prize went 
to Henry Lyons '2<>. of Rockland. 
and brother of the winner of the race. 



CONCERT IN HADLEV 
Hadley town hall will be the scene 
of the first concert of the year on 
the long schedule of the musical clubs. 
The concert and dance will take 
place Friday evening. Although this 
is an early date, the good work of 
the eliib members has booked it to be 
a success. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

The experimental plots near the 
west station are being relaid with 
drain tile. 

.lack "Hutch", captain of the Aggie 
* 1*2-' 13 hockey team may be seen in 
action with Boston A rena team this 
winter. 

The striped basketball jerseys and 
hockey suits of 1919 were purchased 
I'.v the ath'etic association for the 
class of 1920. 

President K. L. Hutterfleld has 
contributed a portrayal of the ideal 
Amherst in l'Jlo 10 the Amherst 
Gr ad ua t e*' (fiuirtcrh/. 

Programs to be used at future in- 
formalswill have a block "M" in place 
of the college seal which formerly 
wn> used on the cover. 

The senior class captain promises 
something new in the line of class 
smokers for the first senior smoker of 
the year, which is set for Dec. 13. 

The grounds department has con- 
linued its decorative work in the rear 
of north dormitory by placing a num- 
ber of shrubs and bushes in the north- 
west corner. 

The likely men who will shoot in 
tin first intercollegiate rille match are 
Canlett ((apt.) '1H, Tuttle '17, Frel- 
lick 'IH Parsons *19, Davies 'IU, 
Phipps IH and Raymond '18. 

Is it a significant fact that only 
seven students desired to join the 
League to Knforce Peace, or was 
everybody too peaceful to take the 
trouble to fill out the blank form? 

Those hard but serviceable bleach- 
ers which were held down oy the foot- 
ball fans are beiug removed aud are 
fo continue their service at the north- 
ern end of the drill hall for the basket- 
ball games. 

Very few observers would imagine 
the extent of area covered in the 
recent plowing of the field between 
GriAMll Arena and the Drill hall. 
There was covered in the work 150 
miles or fourteen furrows or seven 
miles a day . 

Professoi Oatraoder of the meteor- 
ological department has issued a 
report for the weather conditions as 
observed and recorded at the college 
ohaervstory. Ice was recorded for 
the aake of raising the hopes of 
hockeyites. 

Students h* Floriculture 60 are 
looking ahead to next summer when, 
as a result of their blistered bands 
and lame backs, the campus can boast 
of sweet peas with 15 stems. They 
are practicing the old English method 
of trenching tbe soil, alternating soil 
and iiia mi re layei on layer, to store, 
up food for the summer sweet peas. 
According to remarks overheard, tbe 
blooms cut will have to be pretty 
good to offset the labor ex|>ended. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Hrarh, Lincoln and KtniriUon St« . 
BOSTON, r\ASS. 



Only two blocks frmn South Terminal Hta 
tioii.aiHl eimlly reached from North Station 
by l-.ii'vateil Railway, and convenient alike 
to thejereat rptalllahopaand bualneMceiitm, 
abio to the theatiea and placet, of Intnoat. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Ii tile and service iin«ur|MtMeri. 
Booklet and map sent ii|H»n application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. MICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK. AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

Airenta for H»>* 'I > pew t iter 



F. M. CURRAN 



C.|F. DVFR 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUtiS AND CARPETS 

■» K. Ii, m m.-.-ii K8TATK — 

StkPHKN I -an. FOLUKK. Int. 

«AMTMTMMIN(| JKWKMCHH 

IM«> HMIUIJWAV, NKW YOWK 

omtb and ooz&twan 

I'INX AM) l/IM.v. + 
»"i.n. »ir.v«w ««»?» nr„vkc Ml(ni ,, 

JOIN THE BUNCH AT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over po»t office. (',, „„» fl,„i,, 

Pressing lid Cleaning i Specialty 

liberal Ticket ^r»tem | e | ,.. M 

College Stationery 

with CtaM Nmnerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and .Stat loner 



In preparation for the coming 
basketball season trie conrt la the 
drill hall has been repsinted. 



MOVIES FOB FRIDAY 
A well balsnced progrsm of feature 
films and comedy has been secured 
for this Friday night for the Social 
Union •how. 



Gallup at Holyoke 

393*97 High St, 
SEUL5- — 



Hart Schaff ner ft 
Man Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and Me 0ttr 
big store 











J 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



The| Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oriili*ts* Prescription* Filled, Broken Lense* 
Accurately Replaced. KIM Watch Repairing 

Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams IMock, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours • to IS ft. m. 1-HO t.. f. t' <" 



« BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty -And other good thirds to eat 

MKS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hariiey. Mass 

Tel. 41$-" 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Churcli home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKIill M'. MISIMV 1KK% -M-K \T 7 l\ M 

Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

oSTK.ol'ATUH I'lIVSK IAK 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

iiMt'iihiiiM' 
I'.l \ VOI u 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 



UNDERGRADUATE TELLS OF 
AMHERST BOYS' CLUB WORK 



Hi-.. Of 



A. n. HAMLIN, AMHERST. MASS. 

I ,..,|| .,, the I,,,,,,,* and I'lat.-niitj Hotuw#. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

SMiIMb Roller and Pit* Cunnnft. Pipe 
Cut to'h-Uh. Mill -.>P-l»-s tiiKii-wrsi and 
Cont mt M«-an and Hot \\ -te, lifting. 

Connections. .,»•*■»• 



The Highland Hotel 

telry run on the Kuropean Plan_ It t* jusi _* s ep 
rom Main Street, awav from the noise and dust 
end yetfn the center of the hus.ness district. 

it. rnnms ire well furnished and comfortable. 
„ *° Teiphone and h-t and cold running 
water R in e»ery room. Prices Si and up; rooms 
with bath ciHijlel »l.5«» and up. 

Itse»c-Uent cuisine and well ventilated dinin« 
roommak-s ameal a pleasant ^>»° f v-*v e ry- 
K of the highest nual.tv. well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Motel once ;,rui \nu will 
anticipate staying there again. MS* •«•« 
eveninc 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

■ Igfct— 1 Mot-t. N,.rl,.«fl-I.l. M»a». 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

IIKMIV K, >V II I l> 

Ml MmnSib.Ki. N.mrn*Mi r..s 

MaodollP J ..«en.ilne lla«aiun Iknlel^. n • l- 
fstrlniti. etr.. »i..l rrm.lC Mr all liiHriimieiiU and 
all vol.es. Instruments may be had nn trial. 



Candies and Ice Cream 



• * II AJV1F» , » 



Seniors and Juniors 

\n\v is the lime t<> 

buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletin. 

Johnson Book Co. 

Babbitt Wooowohth 

Alpha Sijrnia I 'hi lh»u*e. 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKRKS \NDPOlHHN BRUsWIW 



\mioii-\ii nM\ 



Beef, Mutton, Lamb. Veal, Pork, Hams. Beeaa, >au 
i. Poultry, (lame, Bulter, Cheese, 
EgfS, Olive Oils. 



CoMMINICATIoN T<» THK CoU.EOIAN ! 

Hoys' Clubs. Hoy Scouts, Hoy Pion- 
(M , rs> '_these are phases of work 
often heard around the campus, 
; in vague ways ; hut how many are 
there in the student hotly who have 
ever given the ideas second thought, 
[or, if they have, have followed them 
p to see what they really meant to 
some M. A. C men? How many 
men are there who know that many 
hoys in Amherst and surrounding 
towns are getting much of their 
training ut the hands of Aggie men? 
And how many know that under- 
graduates give up each week a part 
of their leisure hours to fin titer the 
Letter development of the younger 
(feneration? Very few, I am sure ; 
and the purpose of this article is 
merely to bring before the eyes of 
the student hotly a work which, 
while Offering no opportunity f«>r 
personal aggrandizement, does offer I 
10 those interested in hoys— their 
work and their play— a chance to do 
M.n.e practical work which, if it 
returns no personal benefit, cannot 
fail to relied credit on the college 
and on the student himself. 

Boy** woik here at Aggie is under 
the direct charge of the Y. M. C. A- 
with secretaries appoiuted to take 
care of it and. under the general di- 
rectum of these students, groups of 
hoys in Amherst, Hadley, North- 
hampton, ami other surrounding 
towns are given instructions in work 

and play. 

Recently a scheme of organization 
foi local hoys ha* been evolved by a 
joint committee fiom Amherst Col- 
lege and M. A. C which gives a 
lit in foundation for local work. 
The hoys are divided into three 
groups, with Mr. Ceorge Henueyan 
of Amherst in charge of the older 
boy,, X. W r.illette'lKof M. A. C. 
In charge of the Bnj Soonta of 
America, Scott Buchanan 'If. in charge 
the younger hoys (9 to 12) under 
the head of IV iy Pioneers. Plans 
are well under way for the forming 
,»f a local council, a jioverniug 



body,— to he made up of representa- 
tive townsmen and members of both 
the M. A. C. and Amherst College 
faculty, and, as time goes on, a more 
perfect organization will gradually 
develop. This covers fairly well the 
conditions iu Amherst. Several 
students are acting as scout roasters, 
assistants, and club instructors, and 
there are plenty of openings for 

more. 

Outside of Amherst the clubs are 
not so well organized and the de- 
mand for student help is great. 
Troops of Boy Scouts iu Northamp- 
ton are supervised by Aggie men 
In Hadley organized play is the feat- 
ure, and in other of the surrounding 
towns special phases of boys' work 
are taken up. At the present time 
there are groups of boys in Williams- 
burg. Sunderland, and Hatfield who 
need leaders to set the organizations 
on their feet, and give definite in- 
struction in games and drills. 

As was said before, no special in- 
dm cment can he offered any student 
to lake up boys' work. There an-. 
however, many men who have had 
experience in hoys' clubs or organi- 
zations, who like boys, and who are 
willing to give of their time to tin- 
work. To these, this is an especial 
appeal to get in touch with the 
work. The secretary of Boys' Club 
Work in Amherst is N. W. Gillette 
Ms. the outside work is in charge of 

.1. T. Dizer '17. 

.1. T. 1). 



Bhii'ksl..ne. S..rth ami S..11I1 < •«*■ StfUetB, 
BOSTON, . NA5S. 



HOLDS SERIES OF LECTURES 

The extension service, co-operating 
with the Hampshire county farm 
bureau held a series of intension lec- 
tures and demonstrations at West* 
hampton Monday afternoon and 
evening. The work consisted of Iwn 
divisions, one for men on soils, fertil- 
izers, breeding, orchards, crops.b . «1 
ing, etc., and the other for women 
on the home, foods, furnishings, can- 
ning, cooking ami home hygiene. 

A concert by the Dartmouth rami' 
cal dubs was given in the Springrivl.i 
high school RuditoriumduringThank*- 
giving recess. 




A 




MEN'S STORE 



Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local A «^^ of pR|CE COf LAMM C o., BHOWNINO, KIMi ft CO* 



Custom Tal 



OUR DISCOUNT TICKET SA\ I S YOU 5% 

C&rptn-ler & Morehousr 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherat, Maaa. 




.ttual fertilizer mixing. SOM " 
Ask him t»j sell 



t.c.w bring Ui> t t : ' r ' 

The Ex]«-rim. I 

mi^t value |o tin p 

ga .-xhii.it »l feftflta r nti 

fur yutir awney, 

Kfrrntlv '»'i»- tr tin c ;,v ' 

1 Ac y„ur ie-rtilizer ckakt to tbe* trains. 

POTASH SALTS 

■ ♦ , „ „,«,( i»..t ,-h We shall be Klad to send V" ,. 
and brand, ■ . , „„ fertilizers tor vanoim 1 r . 

pamphlel ,11 wish to improve. 

Gl KM NN hA.I >V OR! ' • In. ,, »i^rteri N r!l2SiiBI*. 

ChicaRO. McCoi-mifk Blnck 

Allsuita, Emptf e Bl«i». 



N e w C rlesii.. Whitney C«*«l B""* 1 
S«n Fr*BGU«o, 2S C«iiforni» »*• 



DR. CANCE PROPOSES PLAN 
TO AID MILK PRODUCERS 

The organization of Massachusetts 
milk producers which aims to solidify 
the industry in this state has been 
proposed in a plan drawn up by Dr. 
Alexander E. Cance, professor of 
Agricultural Economics at M. A. C. 
College specialists, farm bureaus and 
county agents have worked together 
on the plan which is divided into 
state, county, and local organizations. 

Only actual milk producers will be 
eligible to membership, and each man 
will have one vote. His fees will 
depend on the quantity of milk he 
sells. Milk grades and standards 
will be enforced, county dairy 
products will be advertised. The 
state union will represent the state in 
interstate federations, and collect and 
publish information concerning dairy 
products and marketing. 

To avoid prosecution, certain regu- 
lations must l>e observed by the pro- 
posed associations. Only bona tide 
farmers may become members, busi 
neas must be done for and with mem- 
bers only, and the associations must 
he instituted for mutual help and 
have no capital stock. 

The state commissioner of corpora- 
tions baa approved a form of organi- 
zation for milk producers, which mav 
he transferred into a co-operative 
society which could establish a milk 
plant, or dairy. Dr. Cance and Mr. 
K. F. Damon, extension specialist iu 
marketing will be glad to advise milk 
producers about the new plans of 
organization. 

MICRO CLUB MEETING 
The Microbiology club will meet 
in the new microbiology building at 
s i*. m. Wednesday evening, Dec. *'>. 
I'rofesaor Loomis of Amherst college 
will give a very instructive talk ii|k»ii 
the "Development of Biology during 
the last 25 years." All that are in- 
terested are urged to be present. 

BUILDING NEW HOTEL 
1 .round has been broken for a 26 
room apartment hotel which Mrs. .1. 
W, K. Davenport will build on Pleas- 
ant street. This large hotel, so near 
the campua, should greatly relieve 
the congestion of guest accomodations 
*t future prom and commencement 
times and especially at the SOlfl anni- 
versary next fall. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'08 — Thomas II. Jones is the 
author of V. S. Department of Agri- 
culture Bulletin 428, entitled '-The 
Eggplant Tortoise Beetle." It de- 
scribes the life history and habits of 
this insect and suggests methods of 
control. 

*H.— R. E. Nute of East Taunton 
is the proud father of u boy, born 
Oct. 1(5. 

"15, — Verne L. Severenee is with 
the Breck- Robinson Nursery Co., 
Lexington, Mass. Address, .0 .lack- 
son Court, Lexiugton, Mass. 

*lo. — Setb W. Banister is with a 
civil engineering firm in Lowell, 
Mass. Address, Westford, Muss. 

'ID. — A. Sumner Coleman is as- 
sietant foreman on a dairy farm in 
Mention, Mass. 

'1(5. — "Rev. and Mrs. McLeod 
Harvey of Washington. D. C. im- 
noiince the engagement of their 
daughter, Jean Archibald, (Western 
M.'i) to Mr. Dean Albert Bicker 
M. A. C. •!<;.'• Dean is on the 
state Nursery Inspection and his 
territory covers the eastern half of 
Iowa. Address, Flat A, Coy Set 
Roy Building, Davenport, Iowa. 




JUST 
A 



TIP! 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Making Survey. 
Prof. John E. Ostrander of the 
tiiathematica department has recently 
»»iie for the U. S. Government a sui- 
of a tract of land at the corner of 
s l*ring street and Maple avenue for 
the site of the new Post-office. 

1'fae Physics Department has in- 
stalled a new Brownall two-horse 
power gasoline engine for experimen- 
tal purposes in the sophomore physics 
lahoratory classes. The brake horse- 
power of the engine will be deter- 
mined . 

The department has also inaugu- 
ratnd the practice of giving quizzes 
in the laboratorv work, which has 
ne?er h«n done before. 



DO IT NOW! 

Have you got your preliminary 
ticket for the Index yet ? I f not , why 
not? It will be easier to pay part 
now and part later than to pay it nil 
at once. Do you realize that the 
Iiitb x will be out so that you can 
take a copy home at Christmas and 
show your girl what goes on at 
Aggie? And just think how she'll 
smile when she sees your picture. 
You won't have to worry any more 
over what to get for a Christmai 
present, for what better could mhi 
get than an lmUs't There's the fac- 
ulty section with pictures of all row 
beloved pi of*, the diss sections witd 

all your accomplishments proclaimed, 
the athletic section with pictures of 
all the teams and individual stars, 
the fraternitv and club section, 

af 

another place where you'll find your 
picture, the non-athletic section, 
musical dubs, dramatics, debating 
and all the rest, the military section 
with pictures of each company, and 
then that popular section, the grinds, 
where you'll find something entirely 
different than you've ever seen in any 
other frtdex. Don't put off buying 
your ticket ! Get it now I Adv. 

During the past week the students of 
the New Hampshire State College 
built a stadium around the athletic 
Held. They did all the work, includ- 
ing the building of the bleachers ami 
grandstand and silent only HMW for 
tlie entire construction. 



This year it's Sbccpskin-liru-il Coats that have a clear field. 
Be sure you have yours before the -big" game; you will look 
••right" III one ol these big roomy coats and you won't kflOVt what 
it is to he Cold, 

We have the largest line of these coats in the stale and all ue 
ask is an opportunity to show you the exceptional values that ue 
are able t,, offer you. Ask the man who owns one. 



Hart Schaffner and Marx Suits 
and Overcoats 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Photographers . . , 




LOCALLY: 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass.. 

and South Hadley, Maaa 



Main Ohm* p 

■346-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



Theat Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



, SHWW^WWJWJWW 



AEHBSCMSfevt 



Student* and alumni of the I uiver- 
sUv of Texas have or gan i sed an 
association called the Student's Loan 
association. The association is try- 
ing to collect #100.000 to be used as 
loans to help needy students. 



E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

The Business Farmer's Standard for 
Over 56 Years 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED 

Write to Local Agency Manager 

THE COE-MORTIMEB GO. 

51 Chambers St., New York City 






MI^WJ1.1JMhWA;iA.|.»JMJIJU^ 




(I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1916. 



MUSICAL CLUBS' TRIP 

(Continued from page lj 
I'AIS'I OHK 

1. "CiHiinuli's in Arms Adam 

(Jlee Club 
I. "RtBgold" ' Severley 

Mandolin (lull 
a. selections by Quartet Selected 

4. Hawaiian Melodies Selected 

Ukulele Sextet 
r>. "Somewhere a Voice is Calling" 

Bond 
Mr. Norcruss 
t). "Defiance" Attenhofer 

<;lee Club 

7. "The Highwayman" Alfred Noyes 

Mr. Lei per 

8. Popular Medley Air. by Knipler 

Mandolin Club 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN PENS 



Stock 



Oilers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



I'AKT TWO 

1. "Koute Marcbin' " 

Glee Club 

•I. Southern Melodies Selected 

Banjo-Mandolin Quintet 

3. Popular Medley Selected 

Quartette 

4. "How Rubeiistein played the Piano ' 

Mr. Lei per 
ft, Pilgrim's Chorus Waguer 

Mandolin Club 
<t. "Fiddle and 1" (ioodeve 

Mr. Worthley and violin by Mr. Luee 
7. "Sons of Old Massachusetts" 

Knight 02 
Combined Clubs 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Economic Botany 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



FORMER INSTRUCTOR IN 

ENGLISH WRITES POETRY 

We print the following poem which 
may be of interest to the Aggie men 
who know its author, Willard Wat- 
tle*, now of Lawrence, Kansas and a 
former instructor in English here. 
Mr. Wattles intends to come East for 
1917's commencement. The poem 
which is one of his more recent ones, 
is taken from Current Opinion for 
November : 

I KNOW A TRAIL ON TOBY. 
I know a trail on Toby, 

It leaves the little town 
A half a mile behind it 

To the climber looking down ; 
I've climbed it many happy tines 
I did not climb alone. 

I know a trail on Toby 
Where ferns and grasses meet 

To Hing a friendly softness 
For upward straining feet, 

While overhead the hemlocks 
And balsam lira are sweet. 

The May -Mower peeps in April 
Beneath the melting snow, 

The wand of staid October 
Sets every tree aglow : 

I know a trail on Toby — 
It is not all 1 know. 

POOB, DRAINAGE THE CAUSE 
Excavation has revealed the fact 
that the treacherous spring on west 
campus road opposite "Oneacre" 
was due to poor drainage. The or- 
iginal tile insufficient in size had 
been practically filled with gravel, 
thus forcing all overflow to the sur- 
face. The town Is now laying a 
ger and more adequate system. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
H. M. Gore, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
H. E. Bobbins, Manager 
L. T. Buekraan, Piesideut 
R. L. Holdeu, Manager 
K. 1). Hawley, Manager 
U. S. Flint, Manager 
M. R. Lawrence, Manager 
N. Moorhouse, Manager 
S. F. Tuthill, President 
A. F. Williams, Manager 
1). M. Lipshires, Mauager 
F. W. Mayo, Manager 
K. L. Messenger, Manager 
1). 0. Merrill, President 
J. H. Day, President 
L. T. Buckman, President 
M.J. McNamara, President 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DERT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOUIE COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and J7 mln. past the hour. 



Ther« are Seven Good Reason* why you sliould 
buy your 



COAL 



or 



0. B. ELDER 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUitd ml? frmt 1 A. M * 4 A. M 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mllea of Trackage -rtodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Sf»ctal Can >t RmmmM* Rates 



AMHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. If. CO 



I" I 11c TBRPBY PARLOR 

Clesnilng Pressing- Repairing 
Quickest Mr*lH, !*•« Work, Lowstt Prlee 

All woik carefully done. Work called for *ed 
delivered. Gent** overcoat!, suit a., panti mo 
coats. Ladies* line linen suits a *PS« "/- 
Teams will call erery day at M. A. *. 

WN, FRAN KLIN. Hrop. 
Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. Tel. No M* ■» 



Amherst 



During last week, there was dis- 
played in windows of the Amherst 
College Drug store, the Amherst- 
Williams "Trophy of Trophies," 
donated by a Williams alumnus to 
be awarded to the college scoring the 
most points 111 all contests between 
the two. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



t 1 it 

t I'K 

48c per do*. 
39c per i° l - 



Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms 



1414.1436 Che4rtnut St* 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSIBO 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits for ft* 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1 5° * bm 

All bills payable at co-op. more and PK* 
left there will receive prompt attention. 

GRavsoh tl. Agent ^^^ 

HiMlSSOTBAJI IT. AtsJ .As** 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Muss., Tuesday, December 12, 1916. 



SEVERAL PRIZES OFFERED J UNI °R S to be guests of 
AT ANNUAL POULTRY SHOW 



SENIORS IN STOCKBRIDGE 



To be Held Dec. 15 and 16. The Pub- 
lic Invited. Auction Sale of 
Exhibits Saturday. 

Poultry and eggs of all descriptions 
will he on exhibition Friday and Sat- 
urday of this week, when the students 
conduct their second annual dressed 
market poultry show in Stockbridge 
hall. Seniors majoring in poultry 
husbandry wdl compete for the 
Batchelder and Snyder Trophy, a cup 
on which will be engraved the name 
of the student having the highest 
score in producing, exhibiting and 
judging dressed poultry. (in the 
opposite side will be inscribed the 
name of the farmer winning the larg- 
est number of first prizes on his ex- 
hibits. The men taking the voca- 
tional (one year) coutse will also 
compete for a small trophy offered by 
the department to the highest mau 
in feeding and exhibiting market 
poultry. Ribbons will be awaided to 
those placing in the first four. After 
the student judging, which begins at 
8 a. M. Friday, an expert poultry 
'y 'ge from Boston will place the 

irds on dressed poultry ant I eggs. 

T r ("he show will be open to the public 

1 e. M. Friday and will continue 

(il the conclusion of the evening 

<gram, which will be held in room 

», Stockbridge hall, at K-30. 
fter a few informal remarks by 
! * jultry experti, a demonstration in 
trussing, drawing and boning fowls 
will take place in the machinery room 
in the basement. Here over fifteen 
students will participate in a chicken- 
picking contest for a cup offered by 
John Mullen of Amherst for excel- 
lence in killing and dry picking two 
birds. The men will be judged on 
the basis of speed and the condition 
of the bird after picking. Mr. Fred 
< ockell and Mr. Alfred G. Lunn of 
the poultry department will be the 
judges. 

On Saturday morning at 10 the 
show will open for Its second day, 
and in the afternoon will be held an 
auction of the poultry and eggs used 
in the exhibit. David H. Buttrlek 
"17 of Arlington will be auctioneer. 

The egg show promises to be a 
unique feature of this year's program. 
Many of the local producers have 
already sent in their entries, which 
will furnish good educational points. 



Entertainment to be in Form of Mov- 
ies. Business Meeting und Clans 
Smoker to Follow. 

The senior class has invited the 
class of T.ilH to be their guests at a 
motion picture show in Stockbridge 
Hall on Wednesday evening at 7 
o'clock. The show will consist of a 
five reel dramatic production ''The 
Flying Torpedo" and a Keystone 
comedy **He Did and He Didn't," 
after which the class of 1917 will 
adjourn to the social union rooms, 
where a short business meeting is to 
be conducted. The principal topics 
of discussion will be the class gift, 
the fiftieth anniversary in 1!H7, and 
the plans for commencement. Pro- 
fessors MacKimmie and Neal and 
Captain Fleet will be the guests of the 
class at the smoker which will follow 
ibis business session. Refreshments 
will be served through the catering of 
the dining hall management. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS EXHIBIT 

The Massachusetts Milk, Cream, 
and Butter Show will be held at 
Springfield in the auditorium of the 
municipal group, Jan. 9-12, under 
the auspices of the State Board of 
Agriculture anil the Massachusetts 
Dairyman's Association, supervised 
by Prof. W. P. B. Lock wood. It is 
expected that between 600 and 700 
samples of milk and cream will lie 
submitted for testing and judging, 
which is much superior to last year's 
showing, when but •'><»(> samples were 
entered. The bacterial count of the 
sample- will be taken by the depart- 
ment of microbiology. Cottage 
cheese will be entered for testing and 
judging for the first time, the pro- 
ducts heretofore being milk, cream, 
and butter. 

AVIATOS TO TELL OF HIS 

EXPEBIENCE AS "BIRDMAH " 

Karle L. < Kington, a well-known 
aviator, will give an address under 
the auspices of the Social Union en- 
tertainment on, **My Experiences as 
a Birdman," Friday evening, Dec. l.*>. 
He is ft very interesting speaker, giv- 
ing in his talks a very vivid description 
of an aviator's impressions and ex- 
periences. The entertainment be- 
gins at 7 o'clock. An admission of 
,*iij cents wdl Ire charged to the gen- 
era! public while those holding social 
union tickats will he admitted free. 



COMMITTEE SETS ASIDE 

FEB. 10 FOR ALUMNI DAY 



Fraternity Banquets Friday Evening 

Varsity Basketball Feature of 

Program for Saturday. 

Banquets, athletic contests and a 
new stirring up of old Aggie spirit 
will be the features of Alumni day, 
which comes early next year, being 
scheduled for Feb. 10. As in former 
years, all the fraternities and the 
CommotM club will have their ban- 
quets on the Friday evening preced- 
ing, Saturday morning will be de- 
voted to a tour of inspection of l he 
college in full operation. In the 
afternoon the alumni will be given an 
opportunity to see some special races, 
followed by a varsity basketball gume 
with New Hampshire State in the 
drill hall. Live speakers are being 
secured for the annual banquet in 
Draper hall Saturday night, when 
old and new college songs will be 
tried out to add ''pep" to the occa- 
sion. The day's festivities will end 
in fitting manner with a glee club 
concert in Stockbi idge auditorium. 
While the details are not yet fully 
worked out, advance indications jioinl 
to a snappy program that will appeal 
both to the '"old grads" and the 
"\oiing bloods". 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

FARES POORLY IN WEST 

Purdue Places First. M. A. C.Judges 

Unaccustomed to Types of 

Animals Exhibited. 

Western live-stock judges proved 
themselves the superior of their east- 
ern competitors in the intercollegiate 
juclgiut' contest held in connection 
with the International Livestock show 
at Chicago, 111., last week. The 
Aggie team was forced to take last 
place in the competition with fifteen 
other college teams. Purdue Uni- 
versity took the first honors in the 
contest, Iowa Stale College was 
second, and Ohio Slate Univ. re- 
ceived third place. There was a dif- 
ference of eight hundred [join's be- 
tween the leaders and the Aggie 
men's scores. Prof. J. C. McNult 
and K. I. t^uaifeof the Animal Hus- 
bandry department accompanied the 
team on its trip. The personal! of 
the team was: Thomas J. Dillon *17 
of Warren; Fverett L. Upson '17 of 
New Britain, Conn.; Charles H. 
Clough '17 of Dedham ; Samuel V. 
Noves *17 of Georgetown ; Alfred 0, 
Kinsman *17 of Merrimac. 



No. 11 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 
HONOR FACULTY MEMBERS 

President llutteafield and Dr. Cance 

Chosen to Head Prominent 

American Associations. 

That If. A. C. is continually 
gaining distinctive prominence both 
in state, collegiate and national 
affairs is shown by the recent marks 
of appreciation given President But- 
Icrfield and a facultv member. 

Because of his deep and co-opera- 
tive interest in its recent Washing- 
ton, U. C,, convention President 
Butterfield has been honored by 
election to the presidency of the 
Association of American Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment Stations, 
and so becomes largely responsible 
for the tremendous reconstructive 
work planned for the future. 

At the fourth annual meeting of 
the national conference on market- 
ing and farm credits at Chicago last 
week the National Agricultural 

Economists Association looked for a 
man capable of be com i n g their head, 
and found Dr. Alexandei Cance of 
the agricultural economics and sur- 
vey * department. Dr. Cance is an 
ideal man foi such a capacity, being 
not only an Authority on this branch 
i.f economics but i« endowed with an 
individual constructive ability which 
will be further vitalized through the 
medium of his new position. 



POULTRY CONTEST RESULTS 

Stanley W. De<{m»y, a 17 year 
old l>ov of Georgetown, is the winner 
of the Massachusetts Boys and Girls 
Club poultry contest for lit MI. carried 
On by the Extension Service of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college, 
co-operating with the United States 
Department of Agriculture. DeQnOf 
won in ■ field of 1083 boys and girls 
from the ages of 10 to 1*. receiving as 
a reward a trip to Washington, D. C. 
The second prife was awarded to 
Alonzo Laws, a Framingham hoy, 
who will be given trips to inte resti ng 
places in New England. 

Thecontest wascai ii«*«l on for four 
months, and awards were based on 
the net profit per hen, on egg prod ac- 
tion, on the records and reports of 
the work and on the story of the con. 
testants experience, Each competi- 
tor was required to keep not less than 
six and not more than one hundred 
birds. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



BASKETBALL SERIES 



Rules Governing Interclass Contests- 
Games to Begin Jan. 5 

InterchiHS Imakellmll begins this 
year the evening of Jan. 5, to con- 
tinue each week after until the 
schedule is completed. The series 
promises to be fully as absorbing as 
in former years. Last season the 
freshman quintet hat! but little 
troifble in winning the series with an 
enviable record, but vanity competi- 
tion has this year gathered in the 
cream of the three upper classes, 
practically necessitating the rebuild- 
ing of entirely new combinations. 
Freshman material is rounding out 
into a fast unit and promises to be- 
come an important factor in future 
series. The coming contests will ad- 
here to the following rules; 

1. The Annual Interclass Basket- 
ball Series shall commence Friday 
evening, Jan. 5, and continue until 
each class team has played two 
games with each of the other classes. 

2. Six championship medals shall 
be awarder 1 to the team winning the 
greatest percentage of their games. 
In case of tie the play-off shall be 
arranged by the interclass Athletic 
Board. 

3. On Moutlay of each week a 
list of the names of the varsity play- 
ers selected bv the coach shall be 
posted. This list shall constitute 
the varsity list until the next Mou- 
day and shall consist of at least 10 
men. 

4. On Monday of each week a 
list of the freshman players selected 
by the coach shall be posted. This 
list shall constitute the freshman list 
until the ne.\t .Monday and shall con- 
sist of at least live men. 

5. No man whose name appears 
on either the varsity or freshman list 
shall be eligible to compete in the 
interclass games for that week. 



LANDSCAPE CLUB TAKES 

ON NEW LEASE OF LIFE 

The Landscape Art club of M. A. 
C. which for a long time has theoret- 
ically existed on the campus, was 
last Tuesday night reorganized upon 
a definite basis by the senior mem- 
bers of the club. A constitution has 
been drawn up under the careful 
supervision of President Randall and 
will be presented for the approval of 
the members Thursday night. 

This year, in addition to the elec- 
tion of officers, which has been the 
only red letter date of the club's 
yearly history, it is planned to have 
weekly meetings for the rest of the 
college year with an interesting and 
instructive program carried out either 
by the landscape students themselves 
or by efficient outside talent. Besides 
lectures and discussions there will h* 
practical problems assigned on the 
various phases of landscape work 
that will be encountered, with criti- 
cisms by Mr. Smith of the Extension 
staff or Professors Waugh and Har- 
rison of the Landscape department. 



MUSICAL CLUBS LOOK FOR 

SUCCESSFUL XMAS TRIP 

The musical clubs are fast being 
groomed up for the annual Christmas 
trip to Boston and vicinity. This 
year, judging from the reports of the 
I hurley concert of last week, both 
glee and mandolin clubs even exceed 
those of last year in quality of music 
rendered. The Boston schedule calls 
for eight concerts, the big event of 
the week being the Hotel Somerset 
dunce. Those making the trip are 
as follows ; 

Glee Club. 
('. T. Minvt'r'l.Siil Mntttpelier, Vt. 
M. U. Lawrence "17 « ■ f Falmouth. 
K. L. Mesae tiger '18 of Winsted, Conn 
K. [J. Muck pule 'IS of .Somerville. 
II. N. Worth ley '18 of Wakeliehl. 

tt. \v. Weeks i*..i iiv.le Park. 
U. I). Iluwlcy lHui Springfield, 
Kuger lieadlo '19 of Florence. 
II. M. (m.ii 19 .it L'atubridjre. 
.). .L Matfiuui* ! 18 of Lawrence, 
(,.('. NorcroHS '18 of P.riinlield, 
L. 1*. Hastings lUut Springfield. 
\V. G, .sawyer 1H of lierlin. 
H. M. Rodgen 17 of Kveivtt. 
r. K. Ilailuw 17 ..I Maiden. 
A. V. Tilt. ui IS,, I \\ViIe*ley, 
U*. w. Thayer 17 of Somerville. 
Mandolin Club. 

( . \. tiurshin 17 of. Lynn. 
F. II. ( anleft '1* ..! Bedford. 
F. v. Wauuh 'ao of Amherst, 

< . M. H.iarduiaii 20 ut Amherst. 

L. \v. Bom 17 <>i Arlington, 
CO. Dunbar iu.,i Westtield, 

W, Naville 17 i>t H.llian, 

I. U. Mitchell '18 of Needham. 

a. M. Bicbardson is of Marlboro. 

F. K. Haines ]*„r Feaho.ly. 

\V. N. Thompson 'IMof Adams. 

.1. F. Whitney '17 of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

a. f. lioy.e Tu ..I Melrose. 
1*. A. tieadio '20 of Florence. 
W. A. I. me -'ii <.f Went lioylston. 
L. W. Burton TO of I'lainville. 
.i. A. Chapman 'i* nt Salem. 
S, 0, Johnson '19 of Gloucester. 

A. I.. Bell 17 uf Newton. 

The Christmas trip engagements 

are : 

Uee, -jt,, DeMolny f.immandery.Masotii.- 

i . tuple, Boston. 
Dec. IS, Somerville High School, Am- 

pices .Somerville Clnh. 
It.-,, 29, Afternoon, Filene's Hestaurant. 

Kveniug, Sotnewel Hotel, annual 

concert and danee. 
Dee, ;Ut. open. 

Her. 31, Ford Hall Foundation, Boston. 
Jan. 1, Newhurypof' . 
Jan. 2. Falmouth, 



FORM CHEMISTRY CLUB 
At the last meeting of the 1918 
Chemistry Club the following officers 
were elected : President, Fred B. 
Sampson of Kail River ; vice-presi- 
dent. Watren H. McNaught of Ply- 
mouth ; secretary, Oliver O'Neil of 
Dorchester; chairman of program 
committee, Axel U. Stjernloff of 
Worcester. 

Dr. Peters read a letter from 
Sauchelli 1§, describing the oppor- 
tunities for chemistry in Malay 
peninsula. Dr. Anderson spoke 
about "Integrity in Chemistry." 
The subject of Dr, Chamberlain's 
talk was, "Hard Work." Dr. Lind- 
sey gsve, "The Meaning of Chem- 
istry," 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 



F 



'OR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 






Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 



Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 



/ r ree delivery to Amherst of 
any -purchase — large or small. 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3,7-Hp. in. Sunday and 
other hours l.y appointment. 



Croysdale Inn 

SOUTH IIAOI.KV. MASH. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone «S»-\V. Hofyofce , 



Cox Sons &Vining 

72 Madiion Ave., New York 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Mass, 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 




.ps 

Grown s 
Hoods 

for all Degrees 

CLER8Y AND CHOIR 



RAHARS INN 

Northampton. MMMebttfctU 

EUROPEAN PLAN 



ThS BMt Pl»r« to Dine 
All Kindt *f S •• f Mi 

Speeial loftebeon from il-W tot p. m. 

— A la carle terviee 
6-30 a.m. to I |..10p.m. 

R. 1. RAHAR, Prop. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown by the Floriculture) Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cui 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

I •l»|iiiinn SOO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hoie Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 



MR. KEELER TO SPEAK 

To Address Florists' and Gardeners* 
Olub Thursday Evening 

J. N. Keeler, Boston manager for 
Hitcbings & Company, greenhouse 
builders, is to be the speaker at the j 
regular meeting of the M. A. V.\ 
Florists' and Gardeners' Club in 
French Hall, Thursday evening at) 
7-00 o'clock. Mr. Keeler is one of 
the best informed men on greenhouse 
construction in this section of the ! 
country. He will speak on "Uieem 
houses — their Deiials, Arrangements, 
and Construction," and will illustrate 
his talk with a large number of 
lantern slides. 

This lecture Thursday night is the 
first of a seiies to be given under the 
auspices of the club. Tin- list of 
speakers includes some <>f the beat 
men in the country in the different 
branches of floricultural and horti- 
cultural work. The lectures are 
open to all students, and mcmbeis 
of the two lower classes who :ire in- 
terested in floriculture are especially 
invited to attend. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

Mr. Daniel A, Poling of Boston to 
Give Fiiml Talk of Term. 

The last Sunday elm pel speaker 
of the present calendar veur will be 
Mr. Daniel A. Poling of Boston, a 
man perhaps of the highest influence 
and authority on the temperance 
ipiestion in this part of the country. 
A graduate of Dallas College in 1904 
ami a student at Lafayette Seminary, 
he has heen engaged in a work of 
stupendous activity, being presidenl 
of the (Jolted Society of Christian 
Endeavor, vice president of the 
World's Christian Endeavor union, 
president of the National Temper- 
ance Council of America and vice- 
president of the Anti-saloon League, 
the National Intercollegiate l'mlijlii- 
tion Association and the Scientific 
Temperance Federation. In \'J\2 he 
was candidate for governor of Ohio 
lie is the author of "Mothers of 
Men," and numerous religious and 
temperance pamphlets. 



AID IN INVESTIGATION 

Students in Agricultural Econom- 
ics 75, Markets and Marketing, are 
lending their sid in the state inves- 
tigation of this college in an import- 
ant way. Dr. Alexander E. Ounce, 
head of the economics department, 
has heen commissioned by the invest- 
igating committee to write a pamph- 
let on the possible extension of agri- 
cultural production in Massachusetts. 
The object of this pamphlet is to 
show reasons why Massachusetts 
should consider agriculture an indus- 
try importan euough to warrant 
more extende 1 state aid to agricul- 
tural education. In order to obtain 
:ill the information necessary. Dr. 
Cance has asked each member of bts 
'■lass to write his ideas on the 
subject. 



WINTER SHORT COURSE 

To Open Jan. 1 Term Lengthened to 
12 Weeks. Study in Agricul- 
ture and Horticulture. 

The college is looking forward to 
the largest registration ever in the 
annual winter short courses which 
are to start on Jan. 1. The term 
will last 12 weeks instead of It) as in 
past years, and will offer especial 
advantages to farmers who can get 
away for the winter season. Here 
will be afforded every one an excep- 
tional opportunity for "professional 
improvement" along all the lines per- 
taining to agriculture. The college 
extends a broad invitation to the 
people <>f the commonwealth to 
enjoy the benefits of their own state 
college at minimum expense. 

In the agricultural group courses 
ate offered in soil fertility and field 
crops; in types and breeds of live- 
stock, livestock feeding and animal 
breeding; in dairying and dairy bac- 
teriology. Other available courses 
include the study of animal diseases 
and stable sanitation, poultry hus- 
bandry, farm management and farm 
accounts. In the horticultural group 
are short courses in fruit growing, 
market gardening, landscape garden- 
ing, including rural civic Improve* 
incut, floriculture and forestry. The 
allied sciences are not neglected in the 
curriculum offered, which includes 
botany (plant diseases) entomology. 
beekeeping, farm mechanics and rural 
sanitary science, marketing and 
distribution. 

The registration fee for these 
courses, which are given under the 
teaching of the regular faculty staff, 
is $.'t. Besides the COBt of textbooks, 
which is not large, the only expense 
is for living. Early registration is 
especially desirable. 



WORTHLEY NEW LEADER 

Harlan N. Worthley '!«, has been 
chosen l«i lead the glee clubs for the 

remainder of tin* year, due to the 
resignation of Francis (i Edwanls'17, 
of Salem. Edwards was seriously In- 
jured during the football se ison and 
as a result has been forced to gi¥e up 
all college activities, or run the risk 
of a nervous coHspte. Worthley 
has been raembei of the glee club 
and college quartette for three years, 
as well as baritone soloist. 



TO INVESTIGATE STORES 
At the suggestion of the econom- 
ic! department, the oottegi senate 
has appointed a committee of two 
from its number to Investigate the 
merits of co-operative store" in the 
many colleges where they exist. 
with a view to their adaptability at 
M. A- C. On the senate committee 
are Rooert C. Westman '1 7 and Sid- 
ney S. Smith *I§, A faculty com- 
mittee of three. Prof. Alexander E. 
( juice and Ralph N. Ru tledge of the 
economics department and l'rof. 
Harold K, Robblns of the phytic* 
depart neat, will work in conjunction 
with the senate committee. 



GREAT SALE 



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Come to us lor- 



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Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you, 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



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Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF EDITORS. 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Killtnr-ln-l'talef 

MARSHALL () LAN l'MEAR *1», M'tflnit Killtni 
MILFORH R. UWKKN(K'I1. Aaalatant Kttltor 
WILLIAM SAV1LI.K. .IK. '17, Aliminl Kilitnr 



\hsi.i i v n •: KlMTolts. 

JOHN T I'l/Li: 11 

JOBKl'll V. WIIITNKV 17 
FRANK .1. lUNKS IS 

NATHAN W. lilLLK'ITK 'M 

ELIOT M. BUI Tl M 19 

MYKTON r. KVAN8 '19 



BUS I N ESS I ) E 1 ' A KT M K N T . 
MERRILL P. WARNER 17. HimlneM Manager 
JAMES 0. POWBIX '!•* 

AsalftUnt liiini nr»M Manager 
HlRtiKR R. R(MKWII8T 'lit. 

Advertising Managei 

Suhscriptioii |8.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of clian«e of address, sub 
scribcrs will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered ai leinnd-rlnas matter at the Aniherat 
Poit Office. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday. Dec. 12. No. 11 



The next issue of the Collegian 
will appear January 2. 

'I'm. ipiestion of interfrutemitv 
athletics recurs every so often, its 
latest form being the proposed relay 
series, rules for which are already 
being OOftStdered. We have often 
wondered how it has looked to a 
neutral to see in past years one 
class of college men setting itself 
apart from the rest in order to have 
its own little exclusive competition 
without being hampered by the partic- 
ipation of those not fortunate enough 
to wear a fraternity hadge. It is, 
after all, a mighty small matter to he 
exclusive about, yet one that has 
heen a hone of contention between 
fraternities and non-fraternity men 
for some time. Admitting that the 
fraternity is the natural unit to he 
represented by an athletic team, 
would it not be better to drop the 
word *•interfrat^•I•nily ,, and substitute 
the broader term "intramural" as 
applied to such con teste "within the 
walla.** Then no one's conscience 
would prick him if the Common's 
club and other non-fraternity men 
were allowed to enter teams. All 
would compete cut the same basis, and 
the supply of good fellowship which 
the fraternities now gain through 
friendly rivalry would be made just so 
much more effective. We offer as a 
constructive suggestion that the rules 
and regulation! be dmwn up by a 
board! of manager* representing each 
team which desires to enter the series, 
rather than by any committee of the 
fraternity conference. 



The approach to the microbiology 
building has been greatly improved 
by the construction of a gravel walk 
leading west of the physics building 
to the road. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

INoticea tor this column should be dropped tn 
at the Coi.i.FoiA.N office or handed to Nathan 
W. tllllette 'is on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding each iMue.l 

\Vi.iim:-i> \ \ . Dk< . IS 
9-10 1'. H.— Assembly, Mr. Charles H. 

Could M. A. < . 1!»H> 
6-30 r. m. — Mandolin Club Rehearsal, 

Social Union, 
7-00 p. m. .senior and Junior Party, 
Auditorium, 

B-4B P. m. -Senior Smoker. Social 
I'nioii. 

THUKSU \i . |)n . 1 I 

8-80 P. m. — Combined Musical Club Ke- 
liearsal. Auditorium. 

7-no p. it,— Landscape Art < Hub, Wilder 

Hall. 
7-00 1', m. Florist's and Uardener's 
Clttb, illustrated lciliire. Mi. 
.1. N. Keelet. Boston, Mass. 

Fl.'lltAY, IH.« , 1*>. 

m-(hi a. u, to 7-30 p. m. Poultry show. 

7-iMM'. m.— < henfistn club. Chemistry 
l.ibrar> . 

7-uo r. \i. Mr. Karle L. ovinytoii. Au- 
ditorium. 

s \ n i:i> v\ . Hi i . Hi 

lii-oo v. n.~ Poultry Show open to Pub- 
lic 
2-1X1 c. m. Auelion ul Kxliibits. 

Si now Hi.' 17 

{•-III c. M.- Chapel. Mi. Daniel Poling, 
Associate President rhrisiian 
Endeavor. Boston, Mass. 

»i-iMi v. m.— V. M. c. a Meeting. Social 

I llioll. 



MUSICAL CLUBS SCORE 

IN HADLEY CONCERT 

In their first concert of the year, I 
the musical clubs scored a decided i 
success at Hadley Friday, The num- 
bers on the program were practically i 
the same as will be given during the I 
Christmas trip with the exception | 
that the quartet and the banjo and 
banjo-mandolin sextet will be intro- 
duced. 

Friday's concert which lasted 
about one hour and a half, was fol- 
lowed by dancing until after eleven 
o'clock when the last car left for 
Amherst. The audience was com- 
posed mainly of Hadley people. They 
were very responsive and the club 
found it a pleasure to appear before 
them. Mr. Leiper's readings created 
the greatest sensation, laughter and 
applause of the evening, with the 
possible exceptiou of tht Hawaiian 
sextet, which was substituted for the 
popular medley by the mandolin club. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The standing of competitors for 
the business department of the Cois* 
i.koian is announced. 

All competitors should hand in 
their time every week in order to get 
credit for it. One credit is given for 
every two hours of lice work, one 
credit for every 84.00 new advertis- 
ing, one credit for every §8.00 re- 
newed advertising. To be eligible 
for election for either business mana- 
ger or advertising manager a competi- 
tor must have earned twenty-five 
points, oue point of which must be 
from advertising matter, Standing 
through Dec. \i is as follows: 

1919 



S. It Ferris 
II. K. spanieling 
W, C. King 

.1. ( . Maples 
(i. A Smith 
Wm. H. Peck ham 
(. II. Derick 
I) ( . Douglass 



3.1 50 |>ointa 
i.ii points 
fi,".'i points 

ItfiO 

J0.2o points 

13.50 points 

*."."> points 

»1.50 points 

I points 



NO NEW ENT. COURSES 
Incorrect phrasing of facts made 
the « «»i 1 1 i.i vn announce last week 
that **new M courses are to be given 
by the department of entomology. 
The changes involved amount merely 
to a revision and expansion of pres- 
ent courses, enabling the department 
to devote more time than heretofoae 
to some important aspects of its sub- 
ject. This piovides tome new work 
in the courses but the foundations 
have not been changed, and so no 
Additional courses have been offered. 



BOYS 

During Kxams don't worry about 
what you are going to give your wife 
for \iikis. 

We have his brand of lobacco or 
cigarettes in Xmas packages. 

She'll love you better next term. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



RIFLE TEAM PRACTICE 

Several New Men on Squad. Men 
Grooming for First Match. 
Candidates for the indoor Kille 
Team have been knocking holes in 
the bull's-eve for several weeks and 
are looking forward to the date of 
the first match. Two men among 
the leading seoieis have never shot 
before with the squad. They ate A. 
It. Loring and K. W. Rogers, both 
seniors. VV. .1. Sweeney and K. F. 
Parsons both of 11)10 are making an 
excellent showing. The National 
Rifle Association has not announced 
the schedule as yet. but the first 
match is expected soon after the 
Christmas vacation. Any men who 
have not yet reported are asked by 
Captain Canlett to do so at once in 
order that they may receive proper 
trv-outs before the match. 



KORM NEW BOTANY CLUB 

For the essential purpose of instill- 
ing a greater interest in the student 
body, those majoring and engaged tn 
advanced work in botany have formed 
a club meeting probably once s month 
for the discussion and reading of 
papers of interest. The first meeting 
was held Tnesday evening, Dec. 5, in 
Clark Hall and the following officers 
elected ; President, Donald White of 
Wakefield, a Harvard graduate stu- 
dent; vice-president and curator. 
Prof. A. Vincent Osmun of the 
department of liotany ; secretary and 
treasurer, Prof. Charles H. Thomson 
of the horticultural department It 
wss decided to call this latest of the 
numerous department activities the 
Tuckerman Botanical club in honor of 
Professor Tuckerman of the class of 
'78 and an eminent authority on the 
natural science. There followed in- 
structive papers by Dr. Anderson and 
Mr. Martin, both of this department, 
on fleshy fungi and algae found re- 
spectively in and around Amherst 
during the fall of 1916, 



DE LAVAL SUPERIORITY 

Demonstrated Once More at the National 
Dairy Show 

Bl 1*1 KH nmile I'riiiii i-retoti seiia rat ci I l>5' 
l»i' l.a\»l H»|MHt<IH MMSS the usual 
clean HtSSp Of all highest :t«at<l- at 
the great National Imtry Mm held in 
Stulnirlleld. Maiut., In October. 

In the Whole Milk Creamery Hnttei < las« 
the liiuhest iu:ilil wan inaile li> N. ( . Nelanti 
iif firnveClty, I'a. who I* the user of a De 
LavaJ l'o»ii Hi I'.ir.itor, 

In the farm I Miry Hiiltcr Clans the Indi- 
ct award was iiutde to I*. II. Rohtnaon i.i 
EMTfta Maw-. Imttei inaker on Thomas W. 
|jH*etin'» famiiiii. I .o tn. and for Itftecn >ear» 
a lie l.a\.il user. 

In the Maikei t ream Class the three bitfh- 
SSt mores were achieved by T. t*. l.lmUio 
HoMtblHiro, Ma*a, : liranford l-'ariiis, tiroton, 
I'nnn., and A. 8. Harris, Fitelihuni. M;<-- 
1 1 - - i.i-< i|\ el> —nil l»e La*al uaem 

Aalde from the uoltl medal and highest 

awards in these lui|«irtant classes, the great 

rltj of all other awards arid highest 

lea rsi een likewise uiveu to i»c i.i..i 

.iu.iiii i urn lusiiely deumniitratiriit the 
-iipi riofltj of l»e l^iat li.iitj urodttits. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



IfiTl lil:.. \\n\ \\ 

M.w VOSK 



"l K. M.SIHWOM Si 
( IIM M.o 





Automobile Jires 

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SUndaj^maketlroi 

fac* nuar/lycmii tii»r»o: 

Vf»M« Mt mm loch wrfSee irtmi i 

BMMUMlUM 

TtieM Urea e«e._ 
cooatr* orer rough maAngt 
M on hart ptf*aMM,fk«r _ 
•M resl Uenl u any other pneamatl« 
air spaea and prossara btlim Um aama. 

Toeyaratfca«nrt#ei»iw»MattlaiiS"carBfrW* 
tlm ma4eaawar«nae4wneraUrMBtist bodw- 
rmtMied on aa4 tlratrontileacaMKrtba tolerated. 
Many Donbi* Strvlce atyja t! wa aralB a*« in. (*• 
UjS. foyemment and iaropean Wa» ienrlc* 

Oo» otrtpnt It Umiu-d to aeeftala amount, bat 
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All other alMM JK* 




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Bho rnrntnhcil, Fion-sioa* at 10* addition*'; ■ 
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_u: PayDtentwlLbordpfat 
prices a »* diaconn* allowed ( 
two or mora Urea. All 
pmoaal checka moat be 
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Tit th««a tlrefl rmw and 
be W»ylt»eed of their *rr» 
blrhqnalltie*. sv.m direct 
to the coosumet" only. 
TVfrrtpMtv/elrf'rwpoa »•* 

Do«Ms ferric* Tire * 
Rubber Co., Akron. O. 




ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Lee W. Burton '19 of Plainville, 
Mass., has pledged Kappa Gamma 
Phi. 

The agronomy department will run 
a corn and potato show this year in 
connection with farmer's week. The 
prizes, which will he ribbons, will be 
supplied by the extension department 
of the college. 

At the show of the Springfield 
Poultry Club next week a special 
feature has been secured in an M A. 
C. exhibit pertaining to the hoiiain»; 
and care of poultry with eg"; testing 
demonstrations. 

A interesting statistical article 
on race suicide among the people of 
Massachusetts by Dr. Robert J. 
Sprague of tin* departments of hu- 
manities and economics was featured 
in a recent edition of a Boston news- 
paper. 

Students in floriculture ITU spend- 
ing most of their time in the French 
Hall laboratory in an attempt to 
master the names of the numerous 
cut flowers antl the foliage plants in 
demand at ( htistmas time. This 
work is preparation for the practical 
work in retail stores which several 
members intend to try during the 
holiday rush season. 



POULTRY TEAM TO ENTER 
INTERCOLLEGIATE CONTEST 

The poultry judging team under 
the direction of Mr. Kucker of the 
poultry department, is fast shaping 
itself for the coining intercollegiate 
contest which will be held in Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York. 
The men are judging at different 
local shows after the birds have been 
placed by the professional judges 
and the team's work is compared 
with theirs. The team took in the 
Greenfield Poultry Show, at Green- 
Held, Dec. (I, and is planning to 
visit the Northampton Show Dee, 
13, 11, 15, and the Springfield Poul- 
try Show, Dec. 19-2*2. The men 
who made the trip to Greenfield arc : 
Oliver S. Flint *17, of Lowell, James 
I Warren'lT, of North lirook field, 
Mrookfl Light '17, of Milton, and 
David H. fiuttrick '17, of Arlington. 
Four men will make the trip to New 
York, three to judge and one man as 
alternate. 



HOCKEY RINK READY 

A brand new hockey rink will be 
ready to put in place on Alumni Field 
Wednesday. It will be constructed 
of wood. The planks will come in 
ten foot sections so arranged that 
(hey will slide into slots at each end. 
The boards are to be sunk into a gut- 
ter which extends all around the cage 
of the rink, Thisgutter slopes grad- 
ually toward the center of the rink so 
that the thickest ice will be next to the 
noards. All around the outside it is 
to be banked up with dirt and snow 
shottt one and one-half f el high mak- 
ing the rink entirely water-tight, 
the water supply will he obtained 
from the hydrant jnst north of the 
Veterinary Laboratory entrance. 



FOOTBALL CAPTAINS 

Several Collegea Have Chosen Lead- 
ers for 1917. Ends are Pop- 
ular Choice 

Although the election of football 
captaius has been deferred in many 
colleges until an unusually late date, 
there are many who have already 
chosen their leaders for the season of 
H»17. Ends seem to be the most 
popular choice. The following is a 
list made public tit date : 

Harvard, w H. Wheeler, tackle, 

\ onkers, N. v. 
Vale. A. !•'. dales, tackle, ('Hilton, la. 
Dartmouth, l\ .1. [Hiwosnlt, end, 

Hrookllne 
TuftS, K. K. Doane. I'llllliaek. .Solllervllle 

m. a. < ,. i; w. Week*, iniu.a.k. 

Hyde Part 
Williams, (.. it. Clifford, tackle, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Colby, K. Perry, end, Lawrenee 
Carlisle, ';. Tibhets, end. Wiawmslu 

I'enn. Male. |{. A HigfrittR,«wd 

t'nh . Virginia, .1. C, Ward, tackle, 

Paris, K.v. 
Syracuse, Joseph IniMoc mil 
l'm\ . Michigan, ( ledric <', Smith. 

fullback, Raj CUj . M vh 

V. Il.ikul.i Iggtea, Pattl I'elelsini, 

Moor head, S. I ». 
Bprtagfiekl ) . M. < . A.. II. Dree 

halfback, Patten Me, 
Larry Banhart, who has coached 

the Colgate eleven for the last few 
years, will Bueceed Frank Kavanagh 
as coach of football at Dartmouth. 



YOUNG ALLUMNU8 KILLED 

Alfred F. Muellei '12, landscape 
architect, was killer! at KetHMBS, 
Wis., on Dec h, when the autouio- 
bile in which he was riding was 
struck by a train at a grade crossing. 
Mr. Mueller, immediately on his 
graduation in lit I 2. entered the em- 
ploy of Mr. John Nolen, landscape 
architect and city planner, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., ami remained with 
him until very recently, when he was 
elected malinger of the Kemwha 
Homes Co. This in a promising 
housing ami land development pro- 
ject at Kenosha. Wi*. 

He was re c o gnised m one of the 
promising young men in the profes- 
sion, ami was to have appeared this 
week on the program of the American 
Civic Association in Washington, 

In college Mr. Mueller was ■ mem- 
ber of Kappa Gamma Phi and one of 
the organizers of the Landscape Clob. 
His home wss in Jamaica I'lain. 



GRADUATE STUDENT WRITES 

THESIS ON ORCHARDING 

New methods in the care of the 
apple orchard have been presented 
by R. P. Armstrong, a graduate stu- 
dent in the department of pomology 
in this institution, in his thesis en- 
titled "Training of the Apple Tree." 
which he has submitted as the result 
of his research and study for the 
degree of Master of Science, While 
his theories and proposed improve- 
ments in present methods have not 
yet been presented to and officially 
accepted by the college, Mr. Arm- 
strong has substantiated every inno- 
vation by observations on carefully 
conducted experiments mid further 
has found several growers in various 
parts of the country who have fol- 
lowed plans which in part, at least, 
closely approach Iuk own. The gen- 
et ul aim of the work is suiting the 
training to the variety, each branch 
of a variety with large growing 
spurs, for example, being given more 
room to develop than a variety hear- 
ing hranches with short spurs, as 
Opposed to the general methods now 
in vogue of training practically nil 
varieties in the same manner. Mr. 
Armstrong is in favor of the leader 
type of tree rather than the more 
common vase or globulei Upc, and 
has worked out plans for the care 
and training of the trees from the 
time of setting to the hearing age 
which are a departure from methods 
ordinarily advocated. His work in 
every detail hears the marks of care- 
ful investigation, exhaustive study, 
ami extensive experimental verifica- 
tion. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Haacli. Lincoln and Ktnsatoa Si- , 
BOSTON, flASS. 



onb two bliu'kn fii.ni Hmitli Terminal Mtn 
iinii.atiil eaall) reached from North Station 
ii* Kii'vattnl Railway, and ronvaatoni alike 

tu iiu'uiiMi r*« tail 'm|!o|m;iiuI buatnaaa centre, 

alatt tO tin' lln';itn'x anil place* of Oil <•! imI . 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

i'litile aiul «i'i\ tee miNm |ia»io'il 

Booklet um) iiui|i ni' to ii|iiiii application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



PAGEANT MASTER AR1VES 
Mr. William (', l.angdon. master 
of the historical pageant to he pre- 
sented at the anniversary cxeicises 



INFORMAL 

The second informal of the year 
held in the drill hall hint SaturdH 
■fas attended by over 1 L'o couples. 
The chaperons were : from Smith, 
Mrs. Miller, Miss (.race Curler, Mrs. 
( . F. A. l.-uige, Dr. Marion hhep- 
aid ; from Mt. Ilolyoke, Mrs. lielle 

.1. Hhaffner; from If, a. ('., lire. 

Med ami Mrs. Ohiiiuu. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

MPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Rooks Fountain Pens 

tSMrta f'ii la* Typewrite! 
I V CtikkAN C.'l . DVI K 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

ktHIS AND CARPETS 
i l». MARSH KM'ATK 



RESOLUTIONS 

II hrr< <m, it has plea-ted (iod in Ins 
infinite wisdom to take unto himself 
our beloved brother Alfred F, Muller 
*1S, therefore be it 

AvWfed, that the members of 
Kappa (iiiiiiinii I'lii fraternity do ex- 
tern I to hi** family our Hinceicht h\ m- 
pnthv in this their hour of grief, snd 
he it further 

Hemlvi'l, that a COpj of these reso- 
lutions he sent to his parents, that a 



fMlVUHII- I Wf»',J 

StII-MI N 1 iA N K I*'«JI «. I IV. | BC . 

M»Nrr*iTrNiMi .ik.w > i.KHh 

lltfl IIKUADWAV rfRW VIlKk 

<*I.iru \V|» * 'f»l ,1^1-a , |.. 
(•l.N.H AKU KIM.S J» 

■ Oil l». ISff.VMW •".'• HHiiN/r MHIUI H 

— JOIN THE BUNCH AT — 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

\'.j» l«,r jt,.i| ,,vi.i |„, s t ulliiii l'|, oli» flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specially 

TaLj6.M 



liberal Ticket SytUtlD 



College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



copy lie inserted in the MeNHHchuBetts 
next fall, is in Amherst. He ie (oi.ih.iah, and lastly, thnt acopy be 
planning to arrange a municipal . inscribed upon the records of our 
Christmas tree for the town and a I fraternity. 

of Hoc.mu r. Warni A s, J Fm the 

HoitKitT L. Iktin, 



psgeant to represent the l»irlh 
Christ, Several faculty members 
have signified intention of taking 
part, 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and .Stationer 



(iKUAI.I- M. filll.lOAS. ) 



Fraternity 



In a 3-day campaign the Williams 
College Y. M. C. A. raised #K,8dO 
for the betterment of conditions in 
the prison camps of Ktirope. 



E.B. DICKINSON, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williami Block, Amherst, Maw. 

■ Met Hoimi 9 tS 12 a. ro., t-» to B p. »»- 



Gallup at Holyoke 

Kpyiqj HHlh St, 



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Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

(rime down to llojyokc and aee oar 
big slot r 






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1 li 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prtscrmtiong Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Keplaced. I'"me Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable — Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

v mi- 1 ic;i ti anil European Plana 



BIDE- A- WEE 



M 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Socially— And other good thiiiKs to eat 

MKS. L. M. STF.BBINS, 

Middle Street, Jladley, Mass. 

Tel. 4IJ-W 



The Highland Hotel 

Comer of Hilliuan and liarnes Strertl, three 
blocks from the Union DenOt. it • modern hov 
telry run on the Kurope.in l'i.in It is just i step 
from M.iin Street, aw-iv from the noise and dust 
and vet in 'he center of the busines* district. 

Its rou n* ire well furnished and comfort able, 
havintr h telephone and hot and rotd running 
water in ever* room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with hath (single^ SI.AO and up. 

Its exc-llent cuisine .ml w»H ventilated dining 
rmvn makes a meal a pleasant inemorv— every- 
thing of the highest quality well cooked and 
serv-d in the best possible manner. 

Stav at the Highland Motel once and v<>u will 
antiHoate stayina there again. Music even 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

«.|>riiit;!ii-|il N(Hi 



DNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome 

CKllllAl; sUMMV -KHVire-. \T 7 I'. M 

Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OSTEOPATHIC I'llYSK IA.N 

305 LAMBIE BLDG., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

THi'l 1 ' 1 "" 1 ' 

HIV VOI It 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

,ti„ nf 

A, W. HAMLIN, AMHERST. MASS. 

I call at the liiirius and fraternity House*. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers ot Wrought linn and Hi *•>:> Pipe, Valve* 
ind Fittings to. .'-team, SVatei anil <•»., Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Skftch, Mill -upi lies tingueers and 
Contractor* tur Steam »rvd Hoi Wntei Heating, 
Automat, i -prinkler -systems. But lei and Kngne 
Connections. Holyoke, Mm*. 

IfhX KMAN'N 

Candies and Ice Cream 

•' 1IAMP ** 



THAT INDEX RUSH! 

Only those having preliminary 
tickets may enter. The contestants 
shall assemble at the eutrance to the 
campus, just north of the Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity house. At a given 
signal they shall run down across the 
fields in a south westerly direction to 
the frame work used for the tackling 
dummy. From the cross bar of this 
frame work will be hanging three 
ropes and at the top of each rope and 
also at the top of the posts, will be a 
piece of cardboard with a number on 
each, the numbers running from 1 to 
."». The men climbing the ropes or 
posts who get numbers 1 and 2 will 
receive an Index free. Those secur- 
ing 8, 4, and 5, will receive an IhdeX 
for 8. 50,|1.00 and $1.;'»<) respectively. 
No man hIihII take more than one of 
the numbers. 

The lime of the rusli will be an- 
nounced Ityjer. l'emember that none 
can enter who has not a ticket, so be 
sure and get your ticket and be ill ou 
the fun. 



NORTHAMPTON'S NEW MAYOR 
A GRADUATE OF M. A. C. 

Alvertus J. Morse, a graduate of 
M. A. C. in the class of 1894, was 
elected Mayor of Northampton in the 
annual city election last Tuesday. 
Mr. Morse ran on the republican 
ticket and defeated his democratic 
opponent by 142 votes. While at 
"Aggie" Mr. Morse was prominent in 
college activities. He played on his 
class baseball team, was a director in 
the baseball association, director of 
reading room association, vice-presi- 
dent of his class the second and third 
years and president of his class senior 
year. He was also prominent in V. 
M. C A. work. He is a member of 
the Q. T. V. fraternity. In 1901 he 
received the degree of LL. H. from 
Boston University, and since that 
time has been practising law in North- 
ampton. His civic woik in the city 
has been commendable. 



HlrlilMiol o..».|. 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

HBNRY K. WIIITK 

m M us Kim r.i, \..i;iii on -i..s 

Mnndtillrm. Oennin- Hawaiian I kulele,, Pli-ks. 
somas, el.., and mo-ir for all In st r umen t* and 
all voices, iMtfMMMtti may be had on trial. 



Seniors and Juniors 

\o\v is the lime to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For vonr Bulletins. 



START RELAY PRACTICE 

Kleven men reported to Coach 
Dickinson for the first indoor telay 
practice of the winter last Monday. 
There is but one "M" man in college 
at present, but the material, according 
to Coach Dickinson, promises a speedy 
squad. Among the candidates are : 
Captain Pratt '17, (lough '17, Bell 
•17, Bainbridge'lK. Baker MM. Wood- 
ing MM, (;illette Mm and I arpeiiler 
M'.i 



Johnson Book Co. 

Baisisii i Wouiiwoicrii 

Alpha Mlmna l'hi limine 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS iNO POULTRY DRI-sikS 

UIMll ISM 1 I. Ml 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, *au 
sages, Poultry, Oame, Butter, Cheese, 
Erks, Olive Oils. 



lilaik(*l..ne. S.tiih ami S.irili I ptiirp Mio-Ih. 
BOSTON, .... ft ASS. 

9 



F. A SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Hats Furnishings 



JAPANESE APPLES 
Two specimens of apples, called 
Nakanaruko, were recently received 
hv Dr. Shaw from Japan to be iden- 
tified. The Nakanaruko is consid- 
ered a leading variety in Japan hav- 
ing been imported originally from the 
United States, but it is not known in 
America what the true name is. 
The apples were sent to Dr. Shaw by 
A. Kiptichi, a Japanese professor at 
tin 1 Kutiagawa Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, Ho|Migaya, Yokohama. 
Japan, who is carrying on experi- 
ments and investigations in regard to 
fruit culture and is very anxious to 
discover the true name of the fruit. 
The two apples were sent in a tin 
can. hermetically sealed, and packed 
in ground buckwheat. The ontward 
appearance of the apples was perfect 
in every detail, but due to fermenta- 
tion the texture and flavor were en- 
tirelv gone, so it was impossible to 
identifv them absolutely. 



LIBRARY NEEDS USERS 

As indicated by the attendance at 
the Division Library on the second 
lloor of Stockbridge hall, very few 
students know what it has to offer, 
or event that it is in existence. There 
are some 900 volumes on the shelves, 
including Experiment Station bulle- 
tins, I'. S. D. A reports and Farmers' 
Bulletins, the I :'th United States Cen- 
sus, the New International Encyclo- 
pedia, eerd liooks, reference books 
relating to agriculture, and many 
other features. At present there are 
U*. magazines whose current issuer 
and hack number* are on file on the 
desks. In addition* there are some 
40 magazines, contributed by differ- 
ent departments which come in a 
trifle late. Among the many valu- 
able collections, mention should be 
made of an historical compilation of 
newspaper clippings, programs of 
entertainments, ami the like which ■ 
kept on file. Particular attention Is 
drawn to the comfortable chairs ami 
desks, convenient for writing, and to 
the quiet that prevails in sharp con- 
trast to the bustle of the main library. 
The lightinir ami ventilation systems 
are perfect. The hours are from 
8-00 to 12-00 a. m. and I2-.MH to A-l . 
i'. m. IxM*ated so near the dining 
hall, with so many admirable feature!, 
more students could avail the nwlves 
of the idle half-hour at noon, to rend 
or to study. 



Local Agent for 

If. V. PRICE CO., LAMM CO., BKOWNINU, KINO & CO., 

Custom Tailors 

m k Disc oiNT TICKET 8A\ I S Nut: s x 



C&rptrvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No i. Cook Place, 



\m her st. Mass 



P KOF. WAUOH IN WASHINGTON 
Prof. K. A. Waugh is in Wash- 
ington this week attending the annual 
meeting of the American Civic Asso- 
ciation of which he is vice-presi- 
dent. He is also chairman of the 
country planning section ami is to pre- 
side at the session devoted to country 
planning subjects. He will deliver an 
address on "The Classification of 
Country Bonds. 



With the new rushing rules for 
fraternities at the University of Wi§- 
consin, regular initiations will iM 
held st the beginning of the second 
semester and freshmen will be al- 
lowed to Jive in fraternity houses lif- 
ter having completed one semester «»f 
regular university work. Since tin' 
societies have agreed not to meet tke 
first year men at trains, a registration 
system giving their addresses hai 
been organized by the dean. 

Hazing and class rushes have beta 
abolished at Lehigh university tin* 
year. 



APIARY EXPERIMENTS ON 

THE WINTERING OF BEES 

Preparedness is well exemplified 
in the college apiary where the colo- 
uies, under the supervision of Burton 
N. Gates, associate professor of 
beekeeping in this institution, have 
been made ready for the winter by 
superintendent of the apiary, John 
L. Byard. Nearly thirty colonies 
are being wintered outdoors, protec- 
tion being secured by packing in 
winter cases which consist of a box- 
like structure fitting over the hive 
and leaving a space of six to eight 
inches between it and the hive. The 
space is filled with packing of some 
sort, leaves being the customary 
medium, while sawdust and ground 
cork are also being used, and it is 
planned by the department to secure 
data on the efficiency of these ma- 
terials. Cellar wintering is also 
practiced in the apiary mainly to 
secure results which determine the 
efficiency of indoor wintering as 
compared to wintering ou the stands, 
for while the loss due to exposure to 
the weather is usually great in all bee- 
yards, especially when the hives are 
not properly packed, the loses in 
cellar wintering are also usually quite 
severe, since it is hard to secure ideal 
conditions of moisture, temperature 
and like conditions iudoors. The 
college beeworkers have established 
some good records in cellar wintering 
in the past, for the apiary is well 
built for the purpose. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMIS- 
SION TO MEOIOAL COLLEGES 
In recent years developments have 
taken place in the requirements for 
admission to medical colleges in the 
I nited States of which students in 
following their academic studies 
should have knowledge. 

Under the influence of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association, of the As- 
sociation of the American Medical 
(ullages, and of State Boards of 
Medical Registration, all of the bet- 
ter colleges in this country now re- 
quire, or are about to require, for ad- 
mission not less than two years of 
college work, together with the train- 
ing represented by full year college 
courses of eight semester hours value 
each in physics, inorganic chemistry, 
and biology (at least half of which 
-hall be zoology ). all including la- 
boratory work, and s knowledge 
of either French or German. 

Many medical schools have require- 
ments in addition to these, but the 
requirements shove mentioned are 
needed for admission to all colleges 
of the better grade. The Harvard 
Medical School, and certain other 
colleges, require organic chemistry 
1 • fore admission. Certain colleges 
iiiire a degree in arts or science in- 
stead of two years of college work. 
Other special requirements exist. 

Students considering the study of 
medicine are, therefore, sdvised to 
write early in their college course to 



the deans of medical colleges which 
they may wish to enter to ascertain 
exactly what they must do to gain 
admission. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'02.— Prof. C. I. Lewis head of the 
horticultural department and vice- 
director of the Experiment Station at 
Oregon Agricultural college, Cor- 
vallis, Oregon was on the campus this 
week. Professor Lewis has not seen 
the campus since 1909 and now finds 
a large number of changes for the 
better. 

'13. — George Zabriskie 2nd has left 
the New England Westinghouse Co. 
to accept a position in the freight 
department of the (J rand Trunk 
Pacific Railway at Winnipeg. "Zab" 
states that he is only in the freight 
department and not as yet president 
of the road. Address, 277 Assinni- 
lioine Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Authorities at Leland Stanford 
university are making arrangements 
for intersections! baseball games with 
the leading eastern colleges. 

Lawrence college (Wis.) co-eds. 
are working for their letters by hiking, 
playing basketball, track and swim- 
ming, all of which activities gain 
points for them. 

The recent graduation of two Jap* 
anese women from the University of 
Saudai, Japan, with the degree of 
"rik akushi," or bachelor of science, 
marks an epoch in the advance of 
education in Japan. The Imperial 
University was opened to women 
four years ago. 

By order of the Queen of Nether- 
lands, the Dutch minister to the 
United States recently attended the 
l/ioih anniversary pageant at Rutgers 
College. This institution was 
founded in 17G6 by Dutch colonists 
from New York and New Jersey 
under a royal charter from the King 
of England. 



PROGRAM FOR POOLTRT 8 

Kari'tv, i>m i*> 
WW a. «.— itadrti Judtfiiitt (juiicwt. 
10-00 a, m. — Judirnitf "i Bmfcibto, 
14)0 p, m, —The Scro no* Annual Breweri 1 
Market ftmltry and R« 

Ml.tW Will be Open to the 

puhiie. Uoom ;m, 8t<nk. 

brldgd ltHll,a«liiiii.s : (.ii n. 
KvK-lINO KxTKirrusMi-M 
7-;Hl e. m. — iq»euinir Ilemarks. ,J • 

(iraliaiti. 

Development ..l Market 

I»oui»r> Ksliil.iis. L. K 

Payne, 
K,OU 1-. M — Leeture ami 1 leniofi-iralioH 

by lbs JnAgw. 
s-HO e. M. -[)e!u..!f.frai!«(! in TrilmdiiH 

.ind Iloiilnf. 

S»4ft P. M.-S!ll.lellts l*r> I'lek.n« Db«* 

test for the '* Mullen I r.. 

jtlsy.** 

lATl'IHiW. Om l'i. 

HMHI \. M — tqwn Id (lie t'lllilii . 
mjm f M Auction .sale ..i KUithiOt, 



LISTEN ! 




You can get just the rioht present 
here b»r your "Wile". Father or 
Brother ; something that is personal 
and they will use and appreciate. 

Here are a lew suggestions ! 

Silk mufflers, fifty cents to three fltty. 

Smart new ties for every taste, flity cents to one 
fifty. 

New patterns in shirts, made in every style 
known. We specialize in Custom made rever- 
sible collared shirts. Priced at from one to 
four dollars. 

Gloves, lined or unlined, one to five dollars. 

High grade traveling bags and suit cases. 

Boston bags, collar bags, handkerchiefs, sox, 
jewelry, tie racks. 

We will he glad to have you come in and look around. Our 
agent is "Bud'* Koss. 







SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Hart Si. haf fner & Marx Clothes 



School and College Photographers . . . 





LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, 

Tlie*e Studio* offer the beit skilled 



Main OSFICt: 

154O-1 548 Hroadway, 

New York City 



artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 






DID YOU RAISE 300 BUSHELS OF 
POTATOES PER ACRE THIS YEAR ? 



If you did nol you are losing part of your profits. 
I'ntatoes nt id most $2,00 per bushel are the most 
profitable crop «n the farm. ' » u r book, 

"Potatoes: A M«My C«p" 

»ill insure your full proflls. Wiile to-day for 
your copy. 



' 



I.nt»l Agency Mmnrnttr 

THE C0E-M0RTIMER COMPANY, 51 Chanters St., New Yor K City 

HtiiMi.ii.ii* ..i iin iniftMM fcgrlf ultofil I iM'inii ;ii i .1 

tom n tmtw t E . FRANK C0E FERTILIZERS 

1857 Tilt IiSmh Finnan* HanSarS for Slaiy Tun 1917 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1916. 



1916 NOTES 

A. K. Hendry Ihih charge of the 
apiary and fruit at the Corner farm. 
< Greenwich, Conn. 

Kay t'hisholm, Central Trinidad, 
Trinidad, Cuba. "('his'" is superiii- 
teiident of 1600 acres for the Trini- 
dad Sugar Co. 

Kay Wetherbee is principal of the 
bigfa school in Marlboro, N. H. With 
the help of several assistants, Ray 
guards the mental destinies of 250 
pupils. Once in a while he meets 
Mostrom and Weutwortu. who are 
within a few leagees of Marlboro. 

Carlton tliinn is junior partner in 
Charles I. Gunn & Sou, proprietors 
of Maple Grove farm, Sunderland. 
At present they have 20 head of high 
grade Ilolsteins and are emphasizing 
the daily department of the farm. 
The Mettawampe poultiy yards are 
alsoau impoi tant part of the business. 
In the class lettei , recently sent 
out, reference to a list of the class 
was part of a quoted letter, included 
to indicate that the secretary wants the 
present addresses of the men. The 
votes are coming in fast. If you 
have any extra personal data sheets 
please return them to the secretary. 
The two teams of the Moth Sleuth 
league rolled a 12-string match at 
Farmingtou last week. The 1916 
combmation, consisting of Mattoon, 
Nash and Simmons, Hart(manager), 
polished off the Old Alumni team, 
composed of Alden '1 '>,Bemis 'L"> and 
Wales '12. High string was 110 by 
Simmons, while He mis (Hill claimed 
he had a sore digit) won the cellar 
position with a score of 45 for 10 
boxes. Out of consideration for the 
feelings of the Old Alumni, total pin- 
fall figures are witheld. 

Since Sept. 1, Hill Estes has been 
in Atlanta. Ga., living at the Y. M. 
C. A., Hox 703. "As my delay in 
writing will testify." Hill writes, "I 
have become acclimated to this semi- 
parboiled region ami shall probably 
remain long enough to give the eleva- 
tor boy his customary Christmas tip. 
I like it here very much. I think there 
are great opportunities here and a 
bright future for the landscape busi- 
ness. To date I have been occupied 
as a draftsman chiefly, but shall be 
out on construction work from .Janu- 
ary to May, pait of the time in Teu- 
nessee and part in Florida." 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College fountain pens 



Oilers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural lournalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
1'omology 

Agricultural Chemis:ry 
Agricultural Economics 



Moore's 



Swan's 



Waterman's 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 



OUR RULE 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Hotany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYGN L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Iutereol. Athletics, 

It. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, II 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seventeen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



r her* are SeTen liood Keasom why you should 
buy your 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
tUNCH 

»7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton. Mass. 



Dr. A. I). Browne, the new director 
of physical education at Oreg' : 
Agricultural College, plans to place 
every student of the college on an 
athletic team in some sport. He 
believes that every student who is 
physically fit likes to play some 
game and his desire should lie grati- 
fied. 

Two new journalism clubs, "Cubs" 
and "The Scoops," have been organ- 
ised by the students of Journalism 
at the University of Wisconsin, Each 
will meet twice a month to listen to 
talks on newspaper and magazine 
work bv active writers and editors. 



Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

Ctofd mlv from t A. M to 4 AM 



C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 
H. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 
E. Robbins, Manager — res. 62-VV 
L. T. Buckman, President — 416 
J. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 
H. D. Hawlev, Manager— 8314 
O. S. Flint, Manager— 544-M 
M. R. Lawrence, Manager— 8347 
N. Moorhouse, Manager — 83(34 
S. F. Tutbill, President— 416 
A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 
I). M. Lipshires, Manager— 416 
F. W. Mayo, Manager— 83 14 
EC. L. Messenger, Manager— H3 17 
1). O. Merrill, President— \ 16 
J. H. Day, President— 8377 
L. T. Buckman, President — 116 
M. J. McNamara, President — 580 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 

The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerneld. thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -ilodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



Leave ACKHE COLLEOE for HOI- 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Special Car* at Rsasssvsbla Rata* 



AMHERST fc SUNDERLAND ST. RY, CO 



THK IKHI'HY PAHL.OK 

Cleansing Pressing Repairing 
Quickest MrsJe«, Bast Work, l.ownt Vt\e» 
All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delirered. Gents' overcoats, suits, P»Bt* * BO 
costs. Ladies' fin* linen suits a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. AC 

WM. FRANKLIN. Prop. 
Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tsl. No J4» 4 



Amherst 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



GO - OP LAUNDRY 

HighGrade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



J0-IJC 

% i-»c 

48c per dor 

- 3©c per do*. 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing 400,3 Suits for Ji.eo 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #15° a 5 ™ ! 

All bllta payable at lo-op. «t»re an<l P««i 
left there will receive prompt attention. 

URAVaoN *V7. Aaettt 

HtoeiUBOTBAii '17. Atst.Agsn* 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 2, 1917. 



No. 12 



HOCKEY SEASON TO OPEN board presents rules I musical clubs make hit 
JAN. 17 WITH SPRINGFIELD F0R awarding numerals in boston and vicinity 






Schedule Calls for Ten Games. Pos- 
sibility of Two Contests with 
Columbia. Freshman Schedule. 

Manager Lawrence has announced 
the varsity hockey schedule for the 
coming season. It consists of ten 
games with some of the fastest New 
Kngland college teams. There are 
two games with thestrong Dartmouth 
seven, one at Hanover and one at 
Amherst ; two with Springfield V. M. 
C. A. College and two with Williams. 
The speedy Yale team will again be 
played at New Haven. 

Following is the schedule : 
If, A. C. vs. Springfield V. M. C. A. 

College at Amherst, Wednes- 
day, Jan. 17. 
M. A. C. vs. Dartmouth. Saturday, 

Jan. 20. 
MA. C. vs. Yale at New Haven, 

Wednesday, Jan. 24, 
M. A. C. vs. Williams at Williams- 

towu, Saturday, Jan. 27. 
M. A. C. vs. M. I. T. at Amherst, 

Tuesday, Jan. 30 (Pending.) 
M. A. C. vs. West Point at West 

Point, Saturday, Feb. .".. 
. M. A. C. vs. Springfield Y. M. C. A. 

College at Springfield, Wed- 
u nesda?, Feb. 7. 

O i. A. C. vs. Middlebury at Amherst, 

Saturday, Feb. 10 (Pending.) 
. C. vs. Dartmouth at Amherst, 

Saturday, Feb. 17. 
H. A. C. vs. Williams at Amherst, 

Friday, Feb. 28. 

a? * 

The hockey season which was for- 
merly started around Christmai time 
has been shortened and condensed, ] 
and now begins the middle of Janu- j 
Hty. This has been thought most sat- 
iafactory because of the poor Ice con- 1 
'litions earlier in the season. Owing j 
to the introduction of three-term 1 
system with finals just before Christ- 
nias, it was considered advisable not 
'" schedule the Boston trip of former 
jean. 

In addition to the schedule ar- 
ranged, there is a possibility of two 
games with Columbia, one here and 
one in New York City. Negotia- 
tions in this direction are being held 
so somewhat because of the inability 
of the Columbia management to se- 
• urt a desirable rink thus far. It is 
probable that either Columbia or 
RensseUer Polytech will be played 
the day before the West Point game 

LCouUnasd so faff* 6 J 



Hope to Give Students Incentive to 

Come Out for Class Teams. 

All Classes Affected. 






The committee on interclass ath- 
letics has drawn up a definite set of 
rides for awarding class numerals in 
the future. These apply to all classes. 
With the object in view of giving an 
incentive to a more general participa- 
tion iu class athletics, the class num- 
erals have been placed on a plane that 
will make them as difficult as possible 
to achieve. By so doing the Board 
hopes to make of them something to 
be respected, appreciated, something 
worthy the efforts of any student of 
the college. Following are the rules 
as drawn up by the committee : 
ARTICLE I.— GENERAL RULES. 

Section 1. Class numerals shall 
only be worn when duly authorized by 
the Class Athletic Board. 

Section 2. The Class Athletic 
Board by unanimous vote may, in ex- 
ceptional cases, award, withhold, or 
take away, the class numerals. 

Section .1. Class numerals shall 
only be awarded for participation in 
games, interclass series, that are duly 
authorized by the Class Athletic 
Board. 

Section 4. These regulations may 
be altered, added to, amended, or re- 
pealed by two-thirds vote of the mem- 
bers of the Class Athletic Board pres- 
ent, provided a week's notice of such 
alteration, addition, amendment, or 
repeal is given to the members by the 
secretary of the Clans Athletic Board. 

Section 5. The class numerals 
shall be of uniform size and design, 
namely, three and one-half inch plain 
numerals. 

ARTICLE II. 

in LM KM THE KBKSHMAS SCHEDULES. 

Section 1. The following Bports 
are considered as having freshman 
schedules : 1, football 1 2, hockey ; 3, 
basketball; 4, baseball. 

Section 2. Anyone who has played 
at least one-half of a game, in a 
majority of the regular scheduled 
freshman games, and the freshman 
manager, shall be eligible to receive 
bis class numerals. 

ARTICLE III. 

i;ri.r> KM, THE ANHUAI. SOFJBOMOMft- 
KUESHHAN OOXTESTS. 

Section 1. The following shall be 
considered annual interclass sopho- 

iroBtlBned on r«B*» ».] 



Christmas Trip Very Successful. 

Alumni Support Somerset Dance 

Well. Last Date Today. 

Highly successful, both financially 
and socially, the annual Boston trip 
of the combined musical clubs of the 
college comes 'to an end tonight at 
Falmouth. The clubs owe a measure 
of their success to the support given 
by the alumni. 

The first concert was given Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 27, at the DeMolay 
Commandery, Masonic Temple, Bos- 
ton. On Thursday evening a concert 
and dance was held at Somerville 
under the auspices of the M. A. C. 
Somerville Club. Among the pat- 
ronesses were Senator and Mrs. 
Eldridge, Mi. aud Mrs. Evans. The 
New Year's lea at Filenes set the 
pace for the alumni concert and 
dance at Hotel Somerset. About 
MO alumni and friends entered into 
the spirit of the occasion and after 
the conceit supplanted the colored 
orcheetra and furnished music for 
the early dances. The orchestra 
pro-tern was made up of "Jack" 
Hutchinson '14 of Arlington and 
Frank Anderson '16 of Somerville 
alternating at the piano, with Ray 
Cusbingex-'16 of Somerville at the 
traps, Harry Brown '14 on the banjo- 
mandoliu, and •"Bud" Ross *17 of 
Arlington on the banjo. The or- 
chestra was accompanied by a 
colored soloist in a number of the 
popular pieces. A buffet lunch was 
served at intermission, after which 
dancing continued until 1 a. m. The 
number of the alumni present indi- 
cated their probable support of all 
similar Aggie projects. The pat- 
ronesses were Governor and Mrs. 
Samuel W. McCall, President and 
Mrs. K. L. Butterfield, Mr. and Mrs. 
E. A. Quincy, Mrs. II . E. Robbins, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Hutchinson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Edwards. 

The clubs 'divided Sunday, the 
Mandolin Club playing at Ford Hall 
in Boston, while the Glee Club and 
Hawaiian Sextet furnished part of a 
musical program at the Strand 
theater. Providence. After the 
concert the Providence section was 
the guest of the management of the 
Hotel Blackstone over New Year's 
day. Present indications from ad- 
vance sale of tickets at Falmouth in- 
dicate a record breaking audience. 

Coniieaad ew pa«« « I 



SEUIHAS MAfMANUS, NOTED 
IRISH POET, TO LECTURE 

At Stockbridge Hall, Saturday Even- 
ing Under Auspices of Social 
Union. Famous Story Teller. 

The noted Irish poet and story- 
teller, Seumas MacManus, will give 
one of his famous lecture-recitals iu 
Stockbridge Hall, Saturday eveuiug, 
Jan. 6, at 7 o'clock, under the aus- 
pices of the Social Cnion. 

Mr. MacManus, who is traveling 
this country, has already become 
very popular with the American pub- 
lic. As a poet, he is a brilliant rep- 
resentative of a race that, more than 
any other, in this scientific age, has 
kept alive this magic power of poetic 
iusight and inspiration. It is, how- 
ever, as a story-teller that he is best 
known to Americans. His story 
telling holds audiences spell-lmund, 
and his portrayal of the beautiful 
lore and quaint life of the Celtic 
people is charming. 

Savs Judge Ben. Lindsev of this 
famous poet stoi y-teller : "Never iu 
my experience have I heard a, more 
wonderful story stelling ;" speak- 
ing in the same fashion, remark - 
John Kendrick Hangs: "In Mr. 
MacManus' animated telling of the 
taleB there is much poetry, for beside 
being a humorist, he is a poet ;" and 
concludes Prof, Lewis Perry of Wil- 
liams college: "After two hours of 
Irish wit and Irish wonder we hated 
to have the Shanachie leave off tell- 
ing his tales." 

Mr. MacManus is the author of 
various books, among which may \» 
mentioned, "The Bend of the Road,'' 
"Dr. Kilgannon," -'Donegal Fairs 
Stories," and "The Leadin' Road to 
Donegal." His latest book in 
"Yourself and the Neighbors," 



SHORT COURSE OPENS 

The annual twelve-weeks shoi t 
course opened today with a registra- 
tion of over a hundred from all over 
Massachusetts. Complete statistic* 
as to the courses elected are not yet 
available. 



ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Hubbard 
of Sunderland announced, at a family 
party Christmas day, the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Edith Rose 
Hubbard, to Merrill P. Warner of 
the class of nineteon-seventeen. 

















ThelMassachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



ATHLETIC FIELD REPORT 

SHOWS SLIGHT DEFICIT 

The ninth report on alumni field, 
dated Jan. 1, 1917, •hows a deficit of 
$248.93, as compared to one of 
$434.44 for that of June, 1916. The 
total contributions to date are $11,- 
055.66, and expenditures $11, 304.59. 
The total contributions up to June, 
1916 were $10,230.40. No collec- 
tions have yet been made from the 
freshman class. 

Professor Hicks plans to submit a 
statement in the near future relative 
to further needs of the field for track, 
tenuis courts, fencing, etc. Follow- 
ing is the ninth report in detail : 



Expenditures. 

Grading. 

Fencing, 

M. A. C. departments, work, 

Lime and fertilizer, 

Seed, 

Implements, 

Tile and cement, 

Student labor, 

Miscellaneous labor, 

Printing and advertising. 

Legal services, 

Total expenditures, 
Total contributions, 



Contributions. 



i i.i" 

•'71 

•72 

•r.\ 

'75 

'7d 

•77 
18 
79 
'61 
•88 
'8fi 
'87 
*88 
•80 
•90 
»1 

m 

'W 
»5 
•96 
*»7 
98 
'W 
'00 
•01 
•03 

"04 
•00 

'07 

m 

'00 

*M 

'U 
18 
'13 
'14 
'15 
10 



Deficit, 



$7,03*2.98 

1 ,083.04 

1,200.25 

03.97 

177.26 

78.54 

213.19 

95.19 

7.09 

08.27 

13.90 

♦11,304.59 
11,065.66 

$248.93 



▲ mount. 
$65.00 
10.00 
295.00 
100.00 
106.00 
40.00 
H3.00 
106.00 
115.00 
46.00 
702.00 
46.00 
167.00 
20.00 
46.00 
160.00 
160.00 
170.00 
69.00 
86.00 
168.28 
49.00 
30.00 
66.00 
86.00 
120.00 
31.00 

86.00 

26.00 

88.00 

320.00 

281.00 

170.00 

90.00 

318.00 

716.42 

600.26 

618.00 

786.69 



Alumni contributions, 



#6,891.64 



'The elate of 1871 has contributed 3C> tona or 
lime and four tons of fertilizer valued at *23t>. 
"The claaa of 1903 la collecting money for tbe 
...nst ruction of a memorial entrance gate. 
•••Tin- claaa of 1918 baa contributed MM to be 
uaed specifically for tbe planting of a hedge 
around tbe licl.l. 



Faculty, 

Friends of tbe college, 
t'.umtruction profits, 
ColUge field fund, 
Recreation field fund, 
' ..liege Sioxal, ('13, '14) 



1377.60 
186.26 
189.78 
408.16 

1000.42 
260.00 



Miscellaneous Contributions, $2,412.11 

rndergraduale contributions: 

1917. $1,024.90 

1918, 460.00 
ItW, 266.60 
Miscellaneous, .61 



Indergraduate contributions, $1,761.91 

Total alumni, 6,891.64 

Total undergraduate, 1,761.91 

Total miscellaneous, 2,412.11 

Total contributions 



$11,066.86 



WELL BALANCED PROGRAM 
OF SPEAKERS FOR NEW TERM 

The administration has been very 
fortunate in procuring for the coming 
term an unusually good list of speak- 
ers for Wednesday Assembly and 
Sunday Chapel. Men have been 
obtained from all walks of life, 
leaders in their own branch of 
work, so the student body will be 
afforded good opportunity to hear the 
big problems of the day discussed 
by men who understand them well. 
The list of Assembly speakers is as 
follows : 

Jan. 3, Prof. Curry S. flicks, M. A. C. 
10, Fending. 

17, Dr. W. D. VVeatuerfonl, mem- 
ber of the international 
committee of the Y.M.r.A. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
24, Joe Mitchell Chappie, editor 
National Magazine, Boston. 
31, Dennis A. McCarthy, poet 
and lecturer, Boston. 
Feb. 7, President Kenyon L.Butter- 
field. 
14, Joseph Novitski, M. A. C. 
21, Hon. Marcus M. Marks, pres- 
dentof the Borough of Man- 
hattan, New York City, 
28, Ralph S. Bauer, president of 
the Essex County Board of 
Trade, Lynn. 
March 7, Capt. Henry W. Fleet, M.A.<\ 
14, George L. Farley, M. A. C. 
Those engaged to speak at the Sun- 
day exercises are as follows : 

Jan. 7— Rev. Charles 8tel»le,New 

York city. 
14 — pres. J.M.Thomas, Mid- 

dlebnry college, Middle- 
bury, Vt. 
il — Dr. S E. Goldstein, Free 

Synagogue, New York 

city. 
28— Rev. Philip S. Schenck, 

pastor Plymouth church 

Framingham. 

Feb. 4— Rev.F.H. Decker, Church 
Honse,Providence,R.I. 

U — Rev. Abraham M. Rihba- 
ny, Church of the Dis- 
ciples, Boston. 

18— Rev. Archibald Black, 
South Congregational 
church, Concord, N.H. 

>:>— Rev. Daniel A. Evans, 
Andover theological 
seminary, Cambridge. 
March 4— Bishop E*. F. Hughes, 
Boston, 

1 1— Owen R. Love joy , general 
secretary of National 
Child Labor Committee, 
New York city. 

18— Dr. W. H. P. Fwwce, 
president of Bi own uni- 
versity, Providence, R.I. 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 

FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

£>amt$ Iranb (Matty* 

Free delivery to Amherst of 
any purchase — large or smalt. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



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Dr. L. O. Wtatman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-8, 7-8 \>, m. .Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 




Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Man 



SOUTH HADLKY, MA8H. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone gBSfrW . Koljroae. 

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7 j Madison Ave., New York 

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floods 

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ROBES FOB JUDICIARY. CLEMY AND CHOIR 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 




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The Bwt n.re to Mas 
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Special lunchaon from U-SO to J a. m. 

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R, J. RAHAR, PTOf. 




FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown fey tb« Floriculture! Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and i*e et 
peas in season. 

QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts, 256 to 75c 
Business mi's Luncheon, 60c 

Mi mki mm •« w* 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 



FLINT 17 AWARDED TROPHY 
AT ANNUAL POULTRY SHOW 

Miss Hallock Gets First in Dry Pick- 
ing Contest. Placings of 
Market Poultry. 

Olivers. Flint '17 of Lowell was 
awarded the Batchelor and Snyder 
trophy at the second annual Dressed 
Market Poultry Show, held Dec. 15 
and 16. He bad tbe highest record 
in producing, exhibiting and judging 
poultry, and his name will now be 
engraved on tbe silver cup, together 
with that of E. O. Damon of North 
Hanover, a commercial poultryman 
who won the sweepstakes in that class 
of exhibits. Of the vocational stu- 
dents, Ernest Anderson of Med ford 
won the cup awarded by Professor 
(iraham for the highest score in feed- 
ing and exhibiting poultry. Miss 
( Jeuevieve Hallock of Woodville was 
the winner of tbe Mullen trophy in 
the dry-picking contest held Friday 
night. Dean Edward M. Lewis, pre- 
sented the cups. 

A. W. Pateh, of Patch & Roberts, 
wholesalers, Boston, judged all the 
exhibits of market poultry, placing 
them as follows : Exhibits made by 
regular students, Chickens — 1st, 
.lames J. Warren '17 of North Brook- 
field, sweepstakes winner ; 2nd, 
lirooks Light '17 of Milton; 3rd, 
( Hiver S. Flint '17 of Lowell ; 4th, A. 
(irundlerof Lowell. 

K- .asters — 1st, Mary Floersh of 
Nashville, Tenu. ; 2nd, O. S. Flint of 
Lowell ; 3rd, A- Grundler of Lowell ; 
tth, I). H. Huttrick of Arlington. 

Capons — 1st, J. J. Warren of 
North Brookfield ; 2nd, O. S. Flint 

• >f Lowell ; 3rd, D. H. Huttrick of 
Arlington ; 4th, Brooks Light of Mil- 
ton. 

Vocational student class, small 
roasters — 1st, N. I. Andrews of 
Mvde Park ; 2nd, O. C. Churchill of 
West Somerville ; 3rd, Miss Genevieve 
Mullock of Woodville; 4th, J. B. 
Savage of Cambridge. 

Large roasters — 1st, Ernest Ander- 
son ot Medford ; 2nd, J. B. Savage 
of Cambridge ; 3rd, Ernest Anderson 
of Cambridge; 4th. A.J. Fitzgerald 
of Braintree. 

Hens— 1st, Ernest Anderson ; 2nd, 
•I II. Savage ; 3rd, N. T. Andrews; 
1th, M. M. Coleman of Mendon. 

lirown eggs — 1st, O. C. Churchill 
of West Somerville; 2nd, Miss Gen- 

• iwe Hallock ; 3rd, A. J. Fitzgerald ; 
>th, Ernest Anderson. 

Commercial claaa, Roasters — 1st, 
2nd and 3rd, E. O. Demon of North 
1 1 •mover; 4th, Paul Dickinson of 
Amherst, 

Fowls— 1st, Harold T. Whitney of 
Hirchfield Farms, South Dartmouth, 
an "Aggie" graduate in tbe class of 
I '» 1 8. 

Hrowi eggs — 1st and 2nd, E. F. 
Caskill of North Amherst ; 3rd, A. 
•' Baker of Amherst. 
H bite eggs— 1st and 2nd, E. F. Gas- 
kill of North Amherst ; 3rd, A. P. 
kittle of Amherst; 4th, Charles 
Thayer of Amherst. 



Buying was not very brisk at the 
auction sale which followed the show 
Saturdav afternoon and raanv of the 
fine birds went at an absurdly low 
figure. David H. Buttrick '17 of 
Arlington acted as auctioneer. 

REV. CHARLES STELZLE 

TO SPEAK AT CHAPEL 

The speaker in Sunday Chapel, 
Jan. 7, will be Rev. Charles Stelzle 
of New York City, He was ordained 
into the Presbyterian ministry in 1900. 
From 1897-99 he was connected with 
Hope Chapel, New York, pastor of 
Mark ha in Memorial church 1899- 
1908, superintendent department 
church and labor, Presbyterian church 
1903-1913. In 1914-1915, Rev. 
Stelzle investigated the economic 
aspects of the liquor problem in the 
United States and the European coun- 
tries, with members of his personal 
staff. As director of mayor Mitchell's 
commission on unemployment, during 
the wtnter of 1914-1915, be directed 
tht relief and emergency measures. 

Mr. Stelzle is one of the foremost 
sociologists in the country today. 
Among his works may be mentioned : 
"The Workingman and Social Prob- 
lems," "Messages to Workingmen," 
"A Study of>a Modern City ," "Church 
and Labor," and "American Social 
and Religious Conditions." 

MUST GET TICKETS EARLY 

Men who plan to attend the next 
informal on Jan. 13, must get their 
tickets before 10 v. m on the Wed- 
nesday preceding, as no tickets will 
be sold after that time. This action 
was found necessary by tbe informal 
committee in order to eliminate the 
confusion caused on previous occas- 
ions by those who delay the purchase 
of tickets until the last moment. 
Tbe committee has further voted that 
no tickets be sold to men bringing 
Smith girls unless the girl's name be 
given at the time of purchase. 
Tickets will go on sale Friday noon, 
Jan. ■'), and may be had of W. It. 
Irving '17, 13 South College, at the 
usual price of 81.50. 

RENOVATED DRILL HALL 

During the Christmas recess the 
Drill Hall was thoroughly fixed over. 
First, it was scrubbed and after- 
wards washed with an antiseptic. 
Then two barrels of oil were used in 
oiling. Powdered boracic acid was 
scattered over the floor to make it 
slippery. The basketball conrt has 
been relined in white, and back- 
boards have been put behind each 
basket. As a result there will not 
be the usual dust, and when a player 
falls, he will not be so liable to pick 
slivers. Again, if he doea, there will 
not be the usual danger from infec- 
tion. 

KISS GOESSMANN TO LECTURE 
Miss Helena Goessmann of the 
faculty will addrew the Sunderland 
Women's Club on Saturday, Jan. 6. 
Her subject will be "Plays and Play- 
ers Before Shakespeare." 






GREAT SALE 



OF 



PATRICK MACRINAWS 



AT CAMPION'S 






Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



I 



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THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




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Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, the 

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The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday. Jan. 2, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF KDITOHS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Kdttor-tn-C hlef 

MARWHA.IJ. O UM'HKAR'18, M'ging Editor 
MILFOKO It. I.AVYKKNCRM7. Assistant Editor 
Wll.UAM HAVIU.K. JR. It. Aluinnt Editor 



kjS0aU.TR EDITOR*. 



• lollN T. IH/.I I! 11 

JOSKTH K. WIIITNK\ it 

frank .i. kinks i* 

NATHAN W. (.IU.KTTK Ik 

Ki.it n m BorruM 'i» 

MYKTON T. EVANS 



19 



BUSINKSS DKIWKTMKNT. 

MEKKIM* P. WARNKK17. Iliinineil M»niger 
JAMK8 C POWELL Ms, 

Assistant Kiistii«ss Manager 

HlKOKK K. RORRQCIwT "l*. 

Advertising Manager 



Subscription 12.00 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

Iu case of CbROgt "f ftddMSS, SRO- 

Mltben will please notify the business 
manager as SOOn as |iossible. 

Kntere'lasseriinil rlss* matter at the Amherst 
I'oat (MM. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Jan. 2. Mo. 12 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Donald V. Howes MH of Ashfield, 
and Arthur N. Bowen of Providence, 
B I., have pledged Beta Kappa Phi. 

William Foley of Palmer has been 
elected manager of the nineteeu- 
eighteen team during the interclasB 
basketball series. 

The social union room lost its giddy 
decoration of red and green during 
the Christmas vacation. It is now 
refinished iu an attractive warm 
brown. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural 
college is mentioned seven times in a 
recent publication, "Record Aids in 
College Management," published by 
the institute for Public -Service of 
New York City. The book is a com- 
pilation form of the best record now 
used in 53 American colleges and uni- 
versities. The purpose of the book 
is to show how student welfare and 
educational etliciency are beiug pro- 
moted by means of meaningful ques- 
tions and records. 



When the senior* at their last 
smoker gave their unanimous support 
tn the itaging <>f ■ college vaudeville 
show this year they took the initiative 
in a proposition long dormant. 
Although it is almost three years 
t*ince the last successful offort in this 
direction, all wh<» saw that production 
will agi ee that it was well worth while. 
No one can say there is any leas talent 
in college now than there was then. 
The problem before the backers of 
the new venture is not OM of talent 
but of stirring up enthusiasm. With 
a little push and "pep" this vaude- 
ville proposition can come through 
with Hying colors. The undergradu- 
ates cannot afford to let tie faculty 
•slip one over" on them again as they 
did so successfully last year. Here 
is a good chance for the student body 
to wake up and show what it can do. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

UfuOrW '•" '"'• flMIII should he dropped In 
at the « "i i r.inx adsCSSI hnndecl to Nathun 
W .ORtsM Ms on or hefore the Monday |>ra- 
• edlng ea«h laaue 1 

W'r |>M M»A1 .' ^ » ;; 
M. \sM-nil.h . I*r..1, « urrv s. 
Hicks. 
|'i;in U . .1 \ 

[nterclass basketball, Drill 
i,. i l i<M7 1990, IW1H 1919. 

*»\ 1 1 i:l> v\ . -I w *l 

H. BeORMM M'Manus. 

bridge Rall,aa«pleas 

I'liion. 
M V|i \ v. .1 vs. 7 
- IU \. m.-< hap<I.Wc>.<'li;«il«-sSiel/.U\ 

\,w York < It] 
.i-<Hi i\ m— Y. M. C. A Mi-Hlnu. N.eial 

Union. 



2-lu r 



71.-. i: M, 



J i»i r 



Mni'k- 
Local 



A table for fruit growers has been 
worked out by Austin I>. Kilham, 
extension professor of pomology at 
M.A.C. in collaboration with K. G« 
Wood. The table shows how to 
pack apples in boxes. 



COMMUNICATION 
To the Editor of the CotxaoiaJi : 

I take the liberty of asking you, 
provideil you cau spare the space 
and think its publication worth while. 
to insert this letter in an early num- 
ber of the COUJWIAK. 

What I have to say is meant more 
for the members of my class, but 
perhaps it will be of interest to mem- 
bers of other classes as well, es- 
pecially those of classes planning to 
hold reunions in 1917 or 1918. I 
choose the Coi.lkoi.vn as the best 
means of reaching the members of 
'OH because I, of course, take it for 
granted that they all subscribe for 
the college paper. 

It may be well for me to admit 
that 1 have not been back to a re- 
union of my class, or in fact to a 
commencement, since I graduated 
from Aggie. However, we all live 
in hopes of improving. 

Last summer I had the pleasure of 
visiting Charlie Bates. "OS, in Mil- 
waukee and naturally we had a re- 
uniou of our own. During this re- 
n n ion we decided that as 1908 was 
to have a tenth annual reunion,— r 
we had previously decided upon thhi — 
it would be best, from our stand- 
point, to have ft at the time of the 
big semi-centennial celebration iu 
1917. We should like to have the 
secretary of 1908 get busy— in fact 
the members of the class should get 
busy aud send their opinions to the 
secretary — and find out which date 
would best suit the majority of the 
members ; the time of the semi-cen- 
tennial or commencement of the fol- 
lowing June. 

Ab to our reasons for choosing the 
time of the semi-centennial for our 
reunion, I would say that our tore- 
moat reason was that we thought it 
would not only be a pleasure for 
every alumnus to lie back at that 
time, but that it was hit duty to help 
make this celebration the higgestever. 



Second : — Commencement is the 
time when the graduating class, their 
families and their friends, should 
hold the center of the stage. At the 
semi-centennial the alumni would, 
perhaps, be giveu more space on the 
front page, though whether or not 
they deserve it will depend upon how 
many are on hand. 

Third : — Is there any better season 
to visit Amherst, or New England 
for that matter, than the fall of the 
year? Doesn't one enjoy its natural 
beauties more then? 

Fourth: — Aud this is the ouly rea- 
son we had that might be termed a 
selfish one, and the only one that we 
decided would be debatable. We 
would more easily get away from out- 
work during the fall than in June. 
We appreciate the fact, however, that 
this would uot perhaps be true for 
all members of the class. 

We hope that other members of 
'08, will come forward with expres- 
sions of their ideas regarding this 
matter, and that we may have a 
sure-enough reuniou at whichever 
time the majority of the class de- 

sires it. 

Thus. H. Jones '08. 

The above communication is in ac- 
cord with the letter recently sent out 
to the alumni by Presicent Butter- 
field aud offers the same reasons for 
a fall reunion. — En. 



BOYS 

During Kxams don't worry about 
what you are going to give youf Wife 
for Xmas. 

We have his brand of tobacco or 
cigarettes in Xmas packages. 

She'll love you better next term. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



RIFLE TEAM ORDERED TO 
SHOOT PRONE AND STANDING 

Captain Canlett of the varsity rifle 
team has juat received word from the 
National Rifle Association head- 
quarters that all individuals of col- 
lege teams competing in the inter- 
collegiate aeries would hereafter be 
compelled to shoot 10 shots prone 
and 10 standing, instead of prone 
shooting only, which was previously 
the case. 

This new action will necessitate 
much more practice than has been 
customary in the past because of the 
dilDculty of "off hand" shooting. 
The reason givett for the innovation 
is that keener competition will result 
among the colleges. Last year, for 
instance, the floaJ result was practi- 
cally decided after the first thret 
matches. 

The first match of the intercolleg* 
iate series will take place on Jan. 27. 
Already the squad is rounding into 
shape, although much practice tnuat 
still be done my each member to ac- 
custom himself to the new style of 
shooting. 

AMHERST 0ET8 ROBERT FROST 
During the absence of Prof. George 
B. Churchill to serve in the State 
Senate. Robert Frost, author of 
"North of Boaton," haa been ap- 
pointed to teach English in Amherst 
college. He will l»egin his new work 
at the reopening of college on Jan. 4. 
It !■ quite probable that the students 
of the college will have a chance to 
bear Mr. Frost speak at M. A. C. 
sometime during the winter term. 



DE LAVAL 

Separators 

Save in Seven Ways 

QUANTITY of cream that no other seiiu- 
rator will recover completely, 

QOAXJTY of cream as evidenced by l>c 
Laval butter a I way* •cut-ins highest in 
ever; Important contest, 

I.AHOK in ever? way over any ffmvltjjuif 
tern or other seitarator. by turning 
easier, being easier to clean and re- 
quiring no adjustment, 

TIME over any gravity system or other sep- 
arator, by reason of greater eai«city 
and the same reasons that save labor. 

i i m I in that the He I .a, a! will last front ten 
to twenty years, while other separator* 
wear out and require to be replaced In 
from one to Ave years 

I'KoKIT In more and better cream, with less 
tabor and effort every time milk is put 
through the machine. 

SATISFACTION which ean only come from 
knowing youlhave the beat separator. 
and are at all times accomplishing the 
best possible resorts. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



RR icitu tow \v 
RKW YORK 



2SK. Maoi*o> Si 
» RICAOO 








automobile iTires 



Soable the thickness ©t U» 
standard make Urea, 

This 10M greater waa rim 
face naturally gives that l 
•sera mileage and service. 



average 

u£2»_ 

tirea as 



Mkgei 

or u 



I mUcs'of ttmen 

id rubber 



^fabric aM one Inch surface tree 
* MkeatfeesaUrea 
These 



»ab*<>luttlitf'uneturtvny>f. 
cicel all ethers tor use In UW 
country over rough andjrairged toads ea well 
as on bard pavements. They are as easy name 
and resilient as any other pnenmatlo Ore I BS 
air space and pressure being the same. „ 

Thoy a»them<*t*P'm<>micaland"c«farrw^ 
Uraa made and are nsed where tl rea must be oe- 

S-nded on and tire tfunbleseanaotbo tolerated. 
any JXmMswrvfe* style tlrcaarelnoseln the 
. 8. government and Kuropean War service^ 
Our r.utpntuilmli. dtoacertaln amount, but 
for a snort time we offer the t ollowing reduced 
special boom as an 1 atnxlwoVorj Offer t 
PRICES 

la. JES Cm &*^>!b* 

in. 16.70 sJb WO* In. 

An other slses not Ineloded In sbor* lis* 
also furnished. VtiM^iafSm^U}^^: m 

Term*: Payment wlUjo l derMabovespectai | / 
prices, a »» *J*eouut allowed on orders forja- 
two aw ieore urea. A'* 
personal checks Boat Ml 
certified. 

Try these tires bow and 
be convinced of UWr Tcry 
hlsn qualities. Sold direct 
to the ci m sumer only. 
Dneript <>* toW* upon f*> 
«u«rt. Hrttt/orU. 
Doable Service Tire & 






1NTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

Series to 8tart Friday Evening in 
Drill Hall at 7-15 

The first of the interclass basket- 
ball games will be played Friday 
evening in the Drill Hall. The first 
game, seniors vs. freshmen, will be 
called at 7-1 ">. After this contest, 
the juniors and sophomoree. will 
battle it out as in days uf sore. 
Six champiouship medals will be 
awarded to the team winning the 
greatest percentage of their games 
during the season. There will be 
two rounds, or a total of six gumes 
for each team. Following is the 
schedule for the first round : 

Friday, Jan. :> — I9l7vs. lu-jo 

\'JlH vs. HM'.i 
Friday, Jan. tt — I it 17 vs. lit I H 

1918 vs. 19iU 
Friday, Jan. 1!>— 1917 vs. 191* 

1UI9 vs. 1920 

Assignments for the use of the 
gym floor for class team practices 
are as follows : 



1917 "^Tuesday nights 8-1 
and v ' and 

1919) Thursday nights G-8 

1918 "J Tuesday nights 6-8 
and [ 'and 

1920 , Thursday nights 8-10 



TO PLAY WILLIAMS 

Basketball Management Increases 
Schedule to Six Games. 
Manager Moorhouse has an- 
nounced that the varsity schedule for 
this season will consist of nx games, 
instead of five as waa previously 
stated. WillianiB college will be the 
additional team played. 

The schedule as it now stands is 
this : 

Ji.n. 20— Conn. Aggie at Amherst, 
afternoon. 
-7 — Rhode Island State at Am- 
herst, evening. 
- — New Hampshire State at 

Durham, evening. 
8 — Williams at Williamstown, 

evening. 
Hi— Springfield at Springfield. 



Jan 
Feb 
Feb 

Feb 



PROF. WAID RESIGNS 

Knrneat D. Waid, who since 1911 
has been assistant director of the 
extension aarrtce at the college has 
resigned his position and will retire 
in the near future to bis farm on 
Amity street, which he is fast devel- 
oping into an attractive projrosition. 
Professor Waid is a graduate of the 
college of agriculture at Ohio State 
university and taught at Knoxville 
college Tennessee for one year. 
Later be went to the University of 
Maine as assistant professor of agrom 
oiuy, which position be resigned to 
engage in extension work in Ohio for 
two years. Since his coming to the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
in 1911 he has worked principally 
with the extension schools ami the 
"•liege fair exhibits, through which 
lie has become widely known and 
-|>ected throughout the state. Dur- 
ing the psst two years he has assumed 
si active part in the administration 
•>f the winter school and other short 
courses, the former coming directly 
under his charge the next session. 
1 1 i» successor haa not been appointed. 



HOCKEY 

[continued from page 11 

at Weat Point, in order to make that 
•to feature trip of the season. 

Manager Carleton T. Smith of the 
freshman team haa arranged n aix 
game schedule with some of the fast 
Wgh school and academy teams of 
the state. There is also a feature 
H»")o [rending with the Dartmouth 
f "-*limen. The schedule: 



SCHEDULE FOR GYM FLOOR 

The department of physical educa- 
tion has issued the following program 
for the use of the gymnasium floor 
during the winter term: 

1. The gym floor is reserved for 
gymnasium classes every day except 
Saturdays from 10 to 13 A. M and 2 
to 4 p. m . 

2. The gym floor is reserved for 
varsity basketball from 4 to 6 p. m. 
Monday, Tuesdsy, Thursday, and 
Friday, and for the regular Freshman 
team Wednesday. 

3. The gym floor is reseved even- 
ings as follows : 

.Monday night u* to 8 Post graduates. 
Monday night M to 10 Keg. freshman 
team. 

Tuesday night 6 to* l'.»|8 claas team 
and 1920 class. 

Tuesday night 8 to 10 1917-1919 

class team. 
Wednesday night 8 to 10 Varsity 

basketball team. 

Thursday night to g 1 9 1 7- 1 !» 1 9 class 
teams. 

Thursday night h to m 1918-1920 

class team. 
Friday night 7-1.5 Class games. 
Saturday night fi to 8 Opt*. 
Saturday night K to 10 Open. 

I, For all other reservations for 
the use of the gym permission must 
be obtained from Mr. Core at the 
physical education ollice. 

5. Sneakers or suction shoes must 
be worn by all men using the floor. 



FRESHMAN SCHEDULE 

Basketball Team to Play Several Fast 
Schools and Academies. 
The freshman basketball schedule 
has been arranged by Lester Odams 
'18. According to the new ruling of 
the Interclass Athletic board no one 
who plays on the regular freshman 
five can play in the interclass games. 
so there will have to be two teams. 
From these two teams, the 1920 
aggregation should get together a 
strong quintet for their games with 
outside high schools. The schedule 
follows : 

Jan. B, SttUth \i-ademy , AmhaiRt, 
10, Hopkins Academy, fiadlsy, 
la, Bast faamp ton \\inh School, 
Bast bam pton. 

20. Open, Amherst. 
27, Hartford High .School. Amherst. 
Kelt. H, Wilbraham academy, Wilhra 
ham. 
IU, Siillichl Iimliiiin , Mithclil, 
17, Deertield A cade m y, Decrfleld. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

I'.i'ui h, l.hi< ulii and MimMnii Ht* . 
BO&TON, flASS. 



Only two blinks fi South Terminal Sta. 

n,u,, ami ewlli reached f i,, lt , North Hratlon 
i» Klsvatea Hallway, and eonvantenl alike 
u> th« k'N-iit retalHaboptand baalnew eantre 
Winn in tin- tbeattet and places <>f Interval 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Table ion! *i>r\ irii nninrnnssod 
iiimkii-t ion) iMiiji mc ni Bpoa application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Prcprlator Manager 



NEW AGRONOMY PROF. 

Professor. I. B. Abbott has become 
a member of the department of 
agronomy for the winter terra. He 
will give the courses in soil fertility 
for both the short course and four 
year students. Professor Abliott was 
brought up on a New England farm, 
graduated from the college of agri- 
culture at the University of Vermont 
and received a Master's degree and 
election to the honorary society of 
Sigma Psi from Purdue He was 
associated with the research work in 
soil fertility at Purdue for seven 
years and for the last two years has 
l>een connected with New Hampshire 
Stale college. He owns a farm in 
southern Vermont. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

CROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BIOCK. AMHERST, NIBS. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 



Fountain Pens 



M£»>ni» for \u\ Typewrite* 



P. M. CURR AN 



C-tP. DVFR 



IS- 

H 



IMttsfieliJ High al Amherst 
-Amherst High (pending) 

Drury High at AmhenU 
-Antbenu High (pendlna;) 

WilJistiiii Seminary at Amherst 
Dartmouth ltr^l (nendinK) 

at Hanover 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB 

That the recently reorganized Land- 
scape Art club is to exist other than 
in theory was shown by sn enthusias- 
tic meeting on the evening of Dec. 
14 in Wilder hall. At this time Prof. 
Arthnr K. Harrison of the landscape 
department spoke on New England 
gardens. At the conclusion of dis* 
cussioDs, 11 business meeting was held 
and a recently drawn up constitution 
presented and adopted. It was 
planned to hold as far as possible, 
weekly meetings with the essential 
purpose of discussing practical prob- 
lems of the various phases of Isnd- 
scape work, either by prominent out* 
side authority or the students them- 
selves. 



H.ORICI I. II KAI. LECTURE 
An illustrated and well balanced 
lecture by. I. II. Keelcr, Boston man- 
ager of ditchings & Co., greenhouse 
builders, on the evening of Dec It 
st French ball, opened a series of 
lloricultoral and horticultural lectures 
planned by the Florist'a and Harden- 
er's club for the year. Mr. K relet 
spoke on "Greenhouses, their details, 
arrangements sod construction," im- 
pieasing his thought through (be 
medium of s large number of lantern 
slides. 



MAMSH'S sanitary 

Students' Furniture 

RUCJS AND CARPRTS 

I l» Ji UiSH r.*| * 1 1 

r..»in lail . i mii j 

StkI'iik.n LaAJtaS I'dH.nv. | f f. 
M*!»i'r*nri!Mi!nn i» \-, ki i i ^ 

I HO It l« Mil WAY. NKW fOttN 

tM.tfil ,v.N'i> OOULMOM 

I'l.N'M AM) WINfjN j» 

»l*»I.r». «iri,V MM «"•,» MMi.V/'K MMKAI.M 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



AMHERST CELEBRATES XMAS 

On Saturday night, Dec. 2S, Am- 
herst held its first Christmas pageant, 
on the bill of the Amherst college 
campus over looking the village green. 
It waa directed by Mr. Langdon 
"The Master of the Pageant," who 
has charge of the M. A. C. semi-cen- 
tennial pageant, Among those tak- 
ing part were President Butterfleld, 
Professor Hpragus and Professor 
Hurd of M. A. C. and President 
Meiklejohn of Amherst college. 

E.B. DIOKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams block, Amherst, Mass 

ofrlra Honrt » l« W a, »,, !-»• t«ft p m 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now Ioejl*'l over poll itflitr Ip nn9 i\ lti < , 

Pf using and Cleaning a Specialty 

l.ihsral Tirk»t SfaSaSi j,| j t[ m 

College Stationery 

WfUl Llass Nuiiierals 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Gallup at Holyoke 

*93-%9J High St 
—SELLS— 

Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke artel see nur 
big store 



m 















^■S 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescription* Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Pine Watch Repairing 
Promptly *nd Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

American and European l'lam- 



" BIDE- A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty — And other 8™d things to eat 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4«5-W 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and llarnes Streets, three 
blocks from the l.'nion Depot, is a m<;dern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan It • just j step 
from Mam Street, away from the noise and dust 
an<l yet in the center of the business distort. 
Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 

ha»)na a telephone and hot and cold running 

water in every mom. Prices •! and up; rooms 

with bath (single) 01. ft" and up. 
ItsescelUlnt cuisine ail tell ventilated dining 

room makes a meal a pleasant »"« morv -* v "„ y ; 

thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 

served in the best possible manner. 
Stay at the Highland Hotel once and v»u will 

anticipate staying there again. Music every 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKOUI.AK *CNI»AY SKKVICK \T 7 P. * 

Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

USTK<»I'ATI1H IMIY.SH IAN 

305 LAMB1E BLOB,, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 

HI \ Mil i: 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

t-li-., uf 

A. W. HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I rail at the Uorms ami l-raternity KeotM. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

lobbersof Wrought Iron and Br as* Pipe, Valves 
and Fittincs for Steam, Water ami Grt. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. I ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Ho Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems. Roller andKn K n-' 
Connections. Holyoke, Man. 

Candies and Ice Cream 



! 



it I I X M I 



> »* 



evening 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Seniors and Juniors 

\o\v is the time l" 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

pot yur Iiulbiins. 



DATE FOR ALUMNI DAY 

CHANGED TO FEBRUARY 9 

The fourth annual Midwinter 
Alumni Day ib scheduled for Friday, 
Feb 'J, 1917, and not od the 10th as 
published in a former issue. The 
program of the day will consist of 
an inspection »>f the college, and an 
innovation is planned along the line 
of alumni addresses, during class 
hours, in connection with the major 
subjects uow being taken up. The 
alumni supper and musical club con- 
cert constitutes the evening's pro- 
gram. On Saturday, Feb. 10, ath- 
letic contests are to be conducted, 
with the basketball game with New 
Hampshire State as a feature. Sat- 
urday evening is given over to the 
fraternity banquet*. 

GREATER BOSTON CLUB 

TO BANQUET MARCH 30 

The Greater Boston Club is to have 
its second annual banquet at the Bo»- 
tun City Club on Friday, March 80. 

Further details and arrangements 
will be made at a meeting of the club 
in the near future. 

The officer* of the club promise 
that everything possible will be done 
to make this year's get-together as 
successful as that of HMG when 100 
Aggie men inaugurated this largest of 
undergraduate clubs. 



ISSUES LIBRARY CIRCULAR 

Charles R. Greene, librarian of 
the college, has just issued an attract- 
ive four-page circular, which gives 
much information regarding the 
library and its work. At the begin- 
ning of the first page, Mr. Greeue 
extends a cordial invitation to every- 
one to use the library whenever pos- 
sible. The resources are then set 
forth in a clear and concise way. The 
olHce hours of library service are out- 
lined on the next page, bo that each 
studeut may know exactly when the 
library is open. Several quotations 
follow in connection with the value 
received from books by such eminent 
scholars as Carlyle, Milton, Dana, 
aud others. 

TO STAGE PAGEANT 

Miss Helen T. Goessraann of the 
English department has wtitteu the 
material for the pageant entitled, 
"Ulkar the Wise," which is to be pre- 
sented in College hall on the evening 
of Jan. 9 and 10 by the Christmas 
player* of Amherst. Miss Goess- 
mann is also staging the pageant and 
directing the rehearsals. Abbots 
and abbesses, yoetnen. kings, pagan 
folk, hunters, trumpeters, shepherds, 
angels and other characters will march 
in the opening processional of 200 per- 
sons and appear iu the prologue, 
three episodes and au epilogue. 



Hlchiaiifi Mot«U, 



*MtMff**M, M»»« 



WHITES MUSIC STORE 

IIKM5V K. WIIITh 

-41 MmnSihiII. N..i;TM\mii..n 

Hsnf -**-* "'"*"■ Hawaiian ITfcaMe* Plcka, 

fltrimrx. et.-,,an«l timsli- tm all li>ntriiin.-iit« and 
all vi. Ires. Instrument* nw) !>•• bad "" 'r^' 1 - 



Johnson Book Go. 

Baijisitt Woohwokth 

\l|.li:i Sigma I'tii House. 




Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *NI> POULTRY DRI-SSI-RS 

Beef, Mutton. Lamb, Seal, Pork, Hams, Baton, Sau 
sages. Poultry, (lame. Butter, Cheese, 
L : k>£S. Olive Oils. 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 
The class freshman team, that is, 
the freshman team for the interclass 
HerU's will be handled by Forrest 
Grayson. All candidate* for fresh- 
man basketball whose names do not 
appear on the fieshman list should 
report to the class team under 
(•ravMiii. 

MUSICAL CLUBS* TRIP 

[Continued from pane 1 1 

The concert will be followed by danc- 
ing until 1 \- H« 

The Introduction of many features 
did it« share In ensuring the success 
of the trip. The Hawaiian Sextet 
and Banjo-mandolin Specialties were 
most popular. 



Blackaione, Sort* and Sort* « rntre mi. .is 
BOSTON, I ASS 



INDEX RUSH JANUARY 10 

On Wednesday, Jan. 10, the 1918 
Ind'X will make its appearance. 
There will be a rush at 3-15, rules for 
which appeared in the Colleoian of 
Dec 12, and immediately after that, 
the book* go on sale in the Y. M. C. 
A. room in North College. Remem- 
ber— only those having preliminary 
tickets can enter the rush, so don't 
put off getting your ticket. Don't 
forget! Wednesday, the 10th is the 
big day. 

•<,H._Sam W! Wiley is the head of 
S. W. Wiley Co., Inc., Analytical 
and Consulting ( herniate. His large 
laboratory at 7 South Gay Btreet, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



• • 




A 




MEN'S 



Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local A *^ nt v ° r pR|CR c() , AMM C() , f BROWNING. KINO & CO.. 

Custom Tailor* 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKET SAVKS YOU 5"/ 




Fertilize. 



The Government and Educational "Authori- 
ties" itjcnd considerable public money in printing 
COHtradh tory statements on this point. 

Grtal fortune* have been made in manufartur- 
Eng fertilise! They evidently pay the maker-.. 

Farmers continue to increase their ferniucr 



t 



Carpervter 6V Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



purchase*, urn 
the farmer. 

But I 
for t>. 
the? 

tattling ml 
thev mere 
the moitif 
the nthe 1 « 



catmg that they are profitable "> 



hich the manufacturer* pre* 

ihtiolr tO tiie f.KHHT ? I-* 1 
j r-itit » .insistent with man' 
■ >t the s-.il ? Or !■) 

ie rlentet t most neede.l rt 
i, c the .ivailalile supplv r»f 



I 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherat, Miu. 



The average fertilizer contain 
average crop takes from »ht 



tlHlf 

1 time 



Von can gucM the answer. Use more FSMun, WI 



it. .( h (ili.iq.lmi if acid as I'iitadi. 1 
,, mtich Potash as phosphoric seta. 



Potash Pays 

p ..,,...! . . | mmg, containing system of rational 



Send for FREE pamphlet en I rowan 
fcrtilwimr a ,u l •otl "' ■'!":-- 

GERMAN KALI V 'WKi, I 

II.. San tfimm, CiL ttarwf hi* »Wf- «" *■.*» '* 

t«M<»?. 1 1 «t«, fa. 



ij Broadway, New Tforfc 



Iheerattli Hkk, ch-cjua. ML 



RESOLUTIONS 



117*, 



/terras, uur friend and cl*ssn>at*, 
Alfred F. Muller has been taken from 
us, in the bey in ni iii. ( .f a mnM promts* 

lag life devoted to the advancemeal of 

bis profession, be it therefore 

Besotted, that we bis elassmalis and 
friends Of 191S do extend to bis family 
our ini.sl sincere sympathy in Ibis iheh 
hour of sorrow and be it furl her 

Beta //■(-(/, thai ire shoe nor apprecia- 
tion of the honor thai Alfred Muller 
has littmghl to bis class, his college, bis 
state ami bis people In the ahor I time 

since gradual ion, by farther 

Hexulrnl, that a copy ol these resolu- 
tions i.e mmo i.i ins family, i bat a oopj 
be Inserted la the ICaaaaehttMitfl I oi.i.r- 

i.ia.n ami lastly that a copy he inscribe. 1 
on I be records of the class. 

For I be class of 1018, 
F. 8. M \i>iMi\ 



Nee 



MERRIMAC MEN DINE 
Aggie men living in the Merrimac 
Valley had an enjoyable get-together 
at the Bartlett Hotel in Haverhill 
Wednesday evening, Dec. 27. Be- 
sides the dozen or more undergradu- 
ate* present, the alumni were well 
represented by Dr. John F. Winches- 
ter '75 of Lawrence, Henry B. Emer- 
son *92 of Methuen ami Chester P. 
Spofford *15 of Amherst. After an 
informal supper, the evening was 
spent in discussing means for carry- 
ing on the newly formed Merrimac 
Valley club, and Btirring up iuterest 
among prospective freshmen. 



FACULTY LADIES HOLD OPEN 
HOUSE 

Seven of the ladies of the faculty 
kept "Open House" New Year's 
Dav to the faculty aud graduate 
students of the college. Light re- 
freshments were served at each 
home. Those who did this were, 
Mrs. Butteilield, Mrs. Feruahl, Mrs. 
Marshall, Mrs. Morse, Mrs. Ostium, 
Mrs. Quaift ami Mrs. Sears. 



LISTEN ! 



PROF. FERNALD LECTURES 
Professor Peroald of the entomo- 
logical department has recently lin- 
ished a seiiesof ten lecture* on "Kco- 
nomic entomology" at Springfield 
under the auspices of the Museum of 
Natural History. The series was 
largely devoted to those ioaeot* of 
economic importance and their rela- 
tion to man. 




HOCKEY PRACTICE 

Varsity hockey practice will be 
held every afternoon from 3 to a. 
The old board rink is to be assem- 
bled on the pond and, weather per- 
mitting, practice will be held there. 

Those who have elected hockey 
for physical education credits will 
have to put in their time during these 
two hours. All work will be super- 
vised by a monitor. 



1915 NOTES 

Found through the efforts of the 
Burns Detective Agency. Unique 
specimen of If IS origin, with this 
to proclaim : Sidney M. Masse an- 
nounces his engagement to Miss 
Elizabeth Falhe of Sayreville, N, J. 

Kd Towne and Oeorge Hall may 
still be reached at 4M W. UJlst, 
«treet, New York City, though they 



1916 NOTES 

(ieorge I'almci. Newton street. 
Chestnut Hill, is working with his 
father in the lloi ist business. Thanks, 
George, for the good suggestions 
concerning the reunion, ele 

To date the «lass record for enroll- 
ment in the associate alumni is belli 
liv '16, with over lo. Let's bang the 
record out of reach with I "(I percent 
enrollment. 

Kd. I'erry, tearing along on his 
way to Idaho, met up with Herb. 
Ilishop at the Hotel States, Buffalo 
and attended the theutei with < units 
Lieber at Culm's Grand Opera, Chi- 
cago, Ed's address is KnunatL. Ida- 
ho, care of Audrew Little. 

M. A. C. was represented at the 
meetings of the American Associa- 
tion of Economic Rotomokigista, 

held lust week, by Ml funnel students 

of her entomological department; a 
large percentage of the total attend- 
ance. The men theie s\eic I'.unies. 
Fernald and Simmons. At the meet 
ings Kicker was ejected associate 
member of the aHQClatioB. 

Lettet recently received bore the 
following heading : "Kiugflther CI 
lege. Kingfisher. Oklft. Dept. of 
Athletics, 0. \Y . Rich, director and 
fnauager.** Send mail to Mux 91*, 
Kingfisher. "A bird of e town." 
Gil writes. 

What lie Iter objecl lesson to pro- 
spective students at Aggie than a 
bunch of walking images of Old 
Prosperity' Therefore, scintillate 
back if you can for Alumni DftJ, 
Feb. 'J. 

••Ked Darling, Stan Hall, C\ 
Little. General Palmer, Heinie 

Hid Herb 

liatifjuet 

s 



You can get just the right preterit 
here for your "Wile", Father or 
Brother : something that is personal 

and they will use unci appreciate. 
Here are :i lew .suggestions; 

Silk mufflers, fifty cents to three fllty. 

Smart new ties for every taste, fllty cents to one 
fifty. 

New patterns in shirts, made in every style 
known. We specialize in Custom made rever- 
sible collared shirts. Priced at from one to 
four dollars. 

Gloves, lined or unlined, one to five dollars. 

High grade traveling bags and suit cases. 

Boston bags, collar bags, handkerchiefs, sox, 
jewelry, tie racks. 



vv 



e Wll 



agent is "Hud"" Ross. 



be glad to have you come in and lunk around. Our 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



harl Sihaffner & Marx Clothes 



School and College Photographers . . . 




lJUDIO 



LOCALLY: 5^ Center St. 

Main Okkh ft; 

1540 1 $.48 Hroadway, 

New York City 



Northampton. Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass 

These Studio» otter the best skilled 
jrUsts and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



wish to keep this secret from all bill 
collector*. 

Sam Moberg has begun his work 
as assistant manager of Cedar Hill 
Farm, Walthatn. 

lull Doran is now located in l)ed- 
''■'"II, N, H. The ehief disadvantage ; Wal k er. Whistle Woollev 
of his position is that it is a long j Walkden gathered in tl 
distance from that place he has heenj na u D f the l*. S. Hotel. Ikislon. on 
visiting so often ''somewhere in Con- 1 Christmas evening. They rejuve- 
"ectieut." inaled thfi wild day* Of their youth. 

"Cbet" Bishop will begin about both in action and words, After 
January flrat a* herdsman of Land- : feasting, theee seven congenial *©n« 
holm Farms, Wells, Me., considered witnessed the -pR^ing Show of 
the Model Dairy Farm of Maine. I'.MO.* -Verily," .piolh they all, -ii ! ii 
They put out the very best tlairy n worthv protluclion." And they h ted 
prodncts, and "without queitlon [ themselves liomewanl, resolved to 
these must be obteined from Guern- j have these little get-togeilu -rs often 
«ev cows.** If not more frequently." 



DID YOU RAISE 300 BUSHELS OP 
POTATOES PER ACRE THIS YEAR f 









If yon did aoi i 

itoes .11 .Miu 

profitable crop 



• ii 



ire losing part of your profit*, 

* .• , prr bushel are the mod 

the f.trm. Oil I b o k , 



Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

Write to day for 



w . 1 1 insure yOor full profit 
your Copy. 



Lot»l A*tncy Pf an»**r 
THK COE-MORTIHER COMPANY, 51 Chambers St., New York Cily 

Hiti,i.ti..i» i.f Hi,, viiii-ri, nil Aittlriillural t lirm|<-al lit 

Na«.f.et,r«««f E# FRANK C0E FERTILIZERS 

1357 Tlia 1u1b*m Faman* Sta«**r* fee SUtr t»n 1917 





















Mkwkmk-m 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1917. 



BOARD PRESENTS RULES 

! Continued from itftise ll 



more-freshman contests : 1, football ; 
2, BJx-nnui rope-pull ; 3, indoor ritte 
team ; 4, hockey ; . r ), basketball ; 6, 
baseball. 

Section 2. Any one who has 
played at least one-half of a regular 
annual sophomore-freshman football, 
hockey, basketball, or baseball game, 
and the mauageisof said teams, pro- 
vided the games be won by the cluss, 
shall be eligible to teceive class num- 
erals. 

Section 3. Any one pulling on the 
winning team in the auuual sopho- 
more-freshman six-men rope-pull, aud 
the manager of the winning team, 
shall be eligible to receive class 
numerals. 

Section 4. The five highest men 
on the winning iudoor rifle team, pro- 
vided they shoot uinety-tive percent 
score or over, and the manager of the 
winning team, shall be eligible to 
receive class numerals. 

ARTICLE IV. 

BOMH fOB THE INTKKCI.ASS SEUIKS. 

Section 1. The following sports 
are considered as having a regular 
iuterclass series : 

a. Fall Cross Country. 

b. Winter ludoor Track. 
C. Baseball. 
il. Spring Tennis. 

Section 2. Any one who has 
scored Brat, second, third, fourth, or 
fifth in the regular annual iuterclass 
fall cross-country run shall be eligible 
to receive class numerals. 

Section 8. Any one who has 
played in I majority of the regular 
iuterclass basketball games for at 
least oue-hulf of each game, provided 
the team win the regular iuterclass 
basketball championship, and the 
manager of the championship team, 
shall be eligible to receive class 
numerals. 

Section I Any one who has won 
first or second or tied for first or 
second in the regular annual iuterclass 
winter meets, aud the manager of the 
winning class track team, shall be 
eligible to receive class numerals. 

Sectiou "». Any one who has 
played in a majority of the regular 
spring iuterclass tenuis matches, pro- 
vided that -the team win the cham- 
pionship, and the manager of the 
championship team, shall be eligible 
to receive class numerals. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 




Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Economic Botany 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, » 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doieters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Seveuteeu Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

M. A. C Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

lnterclass Athletic Committee, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary— 454- W 



H. ML Gore, Secretary — 408-11 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer— 403- M 
B. Robbins, Manager— res. 62- W 
L. T. Buckman, President— 416 
.1. A. Chapman, Manager — 8314 
U. 1). Hawley, Manager— B$U 
O. 8. Flint, Manager— - r >44-M 
M. R. Lawrence, Manager— «3 1 7 
N. Moorhouse, Manager— 8364 
S. F. Tuthill, President— 41fl 
A. F. Williams, Manager— «3(',4 
I). M. Lipshires, Manager— 416 
F. W. Mayo, Manager— 8314 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8347 
I). O. Merrill, President— 4 1 6 
.!. H. Day, President— 8377 
L. T. Buckman, President— 4 Hi 
M. J. McNamara, President— 580 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston, 

MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AUUIE COLLEQE for HOI - 
YOKE at IS mill, past the hour. 

CARS 



Th«r« are Se**n Good Reawii* why you ihould 
boy your 



COAL 



Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 sod *7 mlo. past the hour. 



or 



ELDER 



HIGH COST OF LIVING 

HITS AGGIE MEN HARD 

The high cost of living is no re- 
specter of persons, and it hits the 
college man along with the rest. 
Increased prices of foodstuffs have 
caused hoard at the dining hall to be 
boosted to |fi per week and even 
then there i» the possibility of a 
deficit. Laboratory fees have also 
suffered from the great malady sad 
are now increasing anywhere from 
15 to M» percent to meet the high 
cost of materials. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

, 7 Main St, Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass, 

Lunche s, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUiml mh Mm I A. M »4 A. M 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turnera Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage -rtoderai 
Eq u ips — t — Traw Dispatch- 
ing System Freight and Ex- 
press Service ever entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



■t 



AMHERST V SUNDERLAND ST. W. CO 



, , ( TKMI'SY PAHUOK 

ClMmaiBB Pr»M»«e H*p»»rln B 
U ,,ick«ii MfflM, B«t W«rk, U»«*«« ITl« • 
All woik c*r«fjiUT done. Work «"**<?' "J 
delivered. OMts* overcoat*, taiti., pant* »nd 
coat.. UiWta |a*a suits s »P*J"| ,V ,. 
Tesms will call «ve» 1 d»* st M. A l 

WM. rRANKUIN. Prop 
Rear Nash !»•», AmaerU. T«l No J4» < 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade ColUge Work 



Jacob Reed'i Sow are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
form! worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of oar product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

M akers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1414-1426 CMM SU Philadelphia, Fa, 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



1015c 
1 1 ic 

t t-K 

48c per Aoi. 
- 30c pe' A " 1 - 

DRY CLBAHIHG AUD PRESSING 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 § B ' U for *' °° .. 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, »« 5° » i,u " 

AH Mils payable at Co-o P . Wort and pat** 
left ttasrt will receive prompt attention 

OasYSoN *t1. Aarot , 

llh.mHHMtHK It, ASSt. *«*" 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 9, 1917. 



No. 13 



SUCCESSFUL GRADUATES 
WILL ADDRESS CLASSES 



New Scheme Being Tried Out for 

This Year's Alumni Day, 

Feb. 9-10. 

It is planned to introduce some 
new features into the Alumni Day 
program for Feb. 9 th. In the first 
place the fraternity banquets which 
have usually come on Friday even- 
ing will be held Saturday evening. 
Friday is to be Alumni Day proper. 
A plan is being worked out which 
calls for a suspension of some of the 
regular faculty lectures, and the 
classes thus affected will be addressed 
by alumni. This is done with the 
idea that the alumni talking from 
their experience may be able to dis- 
pense some valuable information to 
some of the undergraduates who are 
blundering through their courses, 
•^optical regarding the vain** of 
some of their work, having confused 
ideas on what they are driving at, 
wondering about the opportunities 
and difficulties awaiting them on grad- 
uation, etc. Then, too, there is the 
lance that the remarks of the alumni 
ay atir the undergraduates to do 

iter work. The endorsement of 
: is plan bv several of the facultv 

1 the value assigned to it by lead- 
in the student body seems to jus- 

' this appeal to M . A. C. graduates, 
jj the alumni are responding favor- 
'' j. Details relative to this will be 
published in s later issue. 

Friday afternoon it is planned to 
hold what may be called an Alumni 
Forum presided over by President 
Bulterfteld. The meeting will give 
an opportunity for the discussion of 
timely questions. The program for 
the round table discussion will be 
announced later. 

All students and all faculty mem- 
>>ers are asked to he present with the 
alumni at the Alumni Dinner at the 
Dining hall Friday night. Immedi- 
ately following this attraction the 
uusical clubs will conclude the day's 
program with one of the best enter- 
tainments they are capable of pro- 
ducing. 

■Saturday afternoon will be devoted 
t<> athletic events the feature of which 
will be the varsity basketball game 
with New Hampshire State. Sstur- 
day evening the fraternities will lake 
iiarge of their respective alumni at 
their initiation banquets. 






"TY" COBB IN MOVIES AT 
STOCK'JRIDGE THIS WEEK 

Unusual Photoplay, Featuring Base- 
ball Star, for Friday and Saturday. 
Also a Five Reel Release. 

Through the influence and co-oper- 
ation of Frank Anderson '16 now of 
the Suubeam Photoplay Company, 
the student body will be given an 
opportunity Friday and Saturday 
eveniugs to witness the clever and 
famous "Ty" Cobb as a moving pict- 
ure actor in a six reel feature film 
entitled "Down in Georgia." This 
is the first time this production has 
been exhibited in New Knglaud for it 
is at present being syndicated out, 
and it is counted n rare privilege in- 
deed by the Social Union Committee 
that they are able to bring it to the 
college. In addition another live reel 
release will be shown making a well 
balanced and entertaiuiug program 
throughout. Admission for non- 
liokters 01 .Social l mou tickets 
will be 26 cents. Short course 
men are urged to take advantage of 
the opportunity to purchase such 
tickets at the treasurer's office for a 
dollar and thus be in a position to 
enjoy this and future entertainments 
at a greatly reduced ux|>ense. 

DEBATING TRYOUTS 

Russell, Sampson, Burt, Newbold, 

Reutnann, and Stockwell Make 

Varsity Team. 

Tryout.s for the various debating 
itig teaina were held hint Saturday 
afternoon under the supervision of 
the pubic speaking council , The fol- 
lowing men were chosen for the var- 
sity team: II. L. Russell *1K, of 
Worcester; F. B. Sampson '18, of 
Fall River; II. I. Hurt T.i, of West 
Somerville; D. T. Newbold '1'J. of 
Northampton. K. Sidney Stockwell 
*1 9, of Sharon, and Theodore Neu- 
mann '18, of New Bedford . These 
six men are to make up the varsity 
squad from which two teams will be 
chosen. The Judges were ; Dean 
Uwis. Professor Kami, Professor 
Patterson and S. S. Smith '18, man- 
ager of varsity debating. The first 
debate is scheduled for February H> 
with the University of Vermont at 
Burlington, 

••Ham" Foster Kx-'l* has been 
assigned as jlieuteiiant in the ;»4lh 
LI. S. Infantry, Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. 



EMORY GRAYSON ELECTED j Q. t. V. FRATERNITY BUYS 
CAPTAIN OF BASKETBALL „_ D _ mm p RO p ERTY 



Has Always Been Prominent in Inter- 
class Series. Eleven Men 
on Varsity Squad. 

Kmory E. Grayson '17, has been 
elected captain of varsity basket- 
ball. Grayson "prepared" nt Mil- 
ford High, where he was captain of 
his team. He was captain of his 
Freshman team and has played on 
his class team for three years, work- 
ing both at center and in the forward 
positions. He is now playing at 
center on the varsity squad, where 
he is putting up a consistent game. 
The varsity squad is composed of the 
following men: K. (liayson '17; 
Hagelstein '17 ; Irving '17; Squires 
*17; Gasser '18; F. Grayson '18; 
Hawley '18; McCarthy '19; Park- 
hurst '1 *J ; Horn! *!!*; and Sedgwick 
'1'J. Those men making up the 
Freshmen first team are : Davis ; 
Harrington; Lent, Lolhrop ; Rich- 
ards ; Steadmau ; and Vigezzi. 



POULTRY JUDGING TEAM 

TAKES HIGHEST HONORS 

At the poultry ahow held Dec. 80, 
I '.»!«; at Madison Square Gardens, 
the M. A. C. poultry judging team 
took highest honors. lirooks Light 
'17 of Hrookline won the highest in- 
dividual prize, a gold medal. The 
final standing of the contesting teams 
is as follows i 

Massachusetts, 17. r >0 
New Jersey, l.W/i 

Connecticut, 1550 

North Carolina. M90 
Cornell, H«.*. 

The individual standing of the M. 
A. C. team was as follows : 
Brooks Light *l 7 of Brookliue. 080 
O. S. Flint*17of Lowell, 610 

Marv Floershof Nashville, Tenn., 510 



SUNDAY FORUM 

At four o'clock Sunday after- 
noon Adelphia will conduct a 
Forum in the old chapel to discuss 
the oiieslion, "Is anything wrong 
with our student government, and 
if so, why?" A live argument is 
expected and the invitation is ex- 
tended to everybody interested to 
attend and take part in the dii< 
•Mission. Remember, Sunday, .Ian. 
It, at 4 i*. m., in the old chapel. 



Includes Lot of Acre and Half. Res- 
idence to be Used as Fra- 
ternity House. 

The A mhei. nt Corporation, Q. T. 
V. fraternity, has completed ar- 
rangements to purchase the residence 
of Mr. II. I). Fearing, including a 
lot of about one aud one-half acres, 
situated on the corner of Pleasant 
and Fearing streets. The property 
will be bought for use by the active 
chapter as a fraternity home. 

One of the finest pieces of prop- 
erty in Amherst, it is at once con- 
venient to the campus, the town 
center, and the trolley line, and ia a 
house in which the fraternty takes 
real pride. The house stands back 
from the street, aud there is ample 
room for tennis courts which will be 
built. 

The house itself, desigued bv ,M. 
Kim, Mead and White, is an Am- 
herst landmark, and unusually well 
constructed. Id the number aud 
arrangement of its rooms it is well 
adapted to fraternity use and at lea*t 
■jr, men ran he accommodated. 

Q. T. V. fraternity owned a large 
tract of land on Lincoln avenue, uear 
the veterinary building, on which it 
was plauued to erect a fraternity 
house A few years ago, however, 
the college authorities made known 
their desire to acquire this land for 
building purposes, sud the fraternity 
has been disposed to secede this 
wish. \A'tk of funds bss prevented 
the trustees from taking over the 
property and this bss forced the frs- 
lernity to postpone, from lime to 
time, the building of a house, plans 
for which were completed some years 
■go. The time having become ans- 
picious for the acquiring of s home, 
the fraternity has decided to locate 
elsewhere rather than to build on 
land apparently needed for the future 
development of the college. 

HAVE PEES. BUTTERFIELD 
President K. L. BaUerfield has 
been suggested as a candidate for the 
coming constitutions! convention 
from either the 3rd Hampshire repre- 
sentative district or from the fsd 
congressional district. The conven- 
tion will meat In Boston during the 
summer to draw up a new constitu- 
tion which will then be submitted to 
the people for adoption or rejection. 









I 






2 



ThelMassachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



PLEDGES FALL SHORT 

Lack Over $400 of the $1700 Asked 
As a result of the pledgeB made at 
last Wednesday's assembly toward 
the Alumni Field fund, $1*286.20 
was pledged out of $1700 asked 
for. The class of 1917 was not 
asked to give anything, but pledged 
$87.50. All the other classes 
fell short of the amount they were 
asked to give. 82000 is needed to 
complete the field, although only 
$1700 was asked for, as there is about 
$.->00 in pledges out in the student 
body, yet unpaid. This $2000 is to 
be expended as follows : $300 for the 
completion of the fence ; $700 for 
grading ; $1000 to complete the track. 
A little over $400 is needed, beyond 
what has already been pledged. The 
amounts each class was asked to give, 
aud what they did pledge, follows: 

\kkki». I'I.KIh.KH. 

1D17 $ 87..-.U 

ID 18 $400.00 851.2* 

191'J GOO. 00 843.85 

1920 700.00 604.10 



HATHAWAY AND BUFFUM 

TO HEAD 1919 INDEX 

At a regular meeting of the sopho- 
more class held Friday evening the 
1919 Index editoi -in-chief and the 
business manager were elected. It 
was also voted that the other posi- 
tions should be open to competition 
to the whole class. First, a blind 
ballot was taken, and the three high- 
est men were balloted on to ascertain 
the choice of the class for the posi- 
tions. On the blind ballot for editor- 
in-chief, Hathaway, Pierson, and 
Hurt were nominated, but as Pierson 
declined, Hastings became third 
choice. On voting again, Hathaway 
was elected. For business manager, 
Hurt, Ferris, aud Huffum were nomi- 
nated. Buffuin was elected. A 
motion was also made to the effect 
that each man in the class be taxed 
$5.00 for the Alumni Field fund. If 
a man had already pledged $5.00 this 
year he is to be exempt, and all 
pledges made this year are to count 
toward the amount taxed. 



VARSITY TRACK 



Squad Now Hard at Work. Start 
Training Table. 
Varsity relay practice is now in full 
swing with something over fifteen men 
at work daily ou the board track. 
This year due to the shortened holi- 
days, candidates were called out the 
week before Christmas thus giving 
Coach Dickinson *10 an opportunity 
to size them up before starting work 
ou the banks and tagging. Captain 
Fratt '17 is the only letter man left 
from last year's speedy quartette but 
Bell and Clough'17, hundred yard 
men, Uainbridge, Hakci, Wooding, 
Gillette *1« aud Carpenter '19 form 
a nucleus around which the yet un- 
tried material may he shaped. Train- 
ing was started in force this week 
with the establishment of a training 
table at the Dining Hall. Manager 
Flint has bo far been unable to bring 
his negotiations with several colleges 
to a definite schedule outside of the 
Coast Artillery meet Jan. 27 when 
they line up against either Tufts or 
Khode Island and the B. A. A. meet. 
W. P. I. will attempt to make good 
her decisive defeat of last year. 
Tentative dates have been arranged 
with Trinity at Hartford and New 
Hampshire State. 

FRESHMEN START RIGHT. 
At a meeting held last Wednes- 
day after assembly 40 Fieshmen sig- 
nified their intention of attending 
the annual banquet of the Greater 
Boston Club, which will be held at 
the Boiton City Club, March 80, 
1917. Last year about a hundred 
"Aggie" men dined at the City Clnb 
and prospects look bright for a larger 
attendance this year. "Ned" Ed- 
wards assures the undergraduate or- 
ganization of the hearty co-opera- 
tion of the Alumni. It is expected 
that the "Aggie" musical clubs will 
furnish the music for the occasion. 



CHEER LEADER COMPETITION 

As a result of Westman's call for 
candidates from the sophomore class, 
the following men have signified their 
intention of competing for the posi- 
tion of assistant cheer leadei, to 
which l'aul F. Hunnewell *18of Sora- 
erville was recently elected : H. Bax- 
ter. J. Callunuu. P. Faxon, W. 
Hathaway, S. Johnson, (J. Peck, If. 

Morse. 

The competition will be run in the 
same manner as competition for assist- 
ant managers of athletic teams. 
F.ach competitor will be required to 
hand in at least a uew cheer, run a 
special trip, and attend all practice 
lhat is held. A special exam will 
be held in June which will count as a 
part for the selection of the men. 

BARNES TURNS UP AGAIN 

Coal-passer, fireman, and seaman 
were the niches filled by Herbert 
Welesley Barnes ex-'17, now *1S, of 
Whitinsville, during his travels on 
board the Norwegian tramp steamer. 
He visited, in the seven months trip, 
ports of France, England, Italy, 
Algiers, Tunis and South American 
ports, stopping at Buenos Aires for 
a while. Following his trip he was 
engaged in floiiculture work at Ruth- 
erford, N. J. He has now returned 
to college and expects to finish the 
floriculture major with the class of 
•18. 

STUDENTS COMPILE CATALOG 

Students in Agricultural Educa- 
tion 51 are co-operating with Prof. 
Hart in compiling a catalog of au- 
thors of and articles pertaining to 
pedagogy as found in the magazines 
and books at the library. This work 
besides being credited is of unlimited 
value to those intending to enter the 
fields of education. 

'14.— Miss Mary B. Chase ha§ an- 
nounced her engagement to Stanley 
B. Freeborn, both of '14. 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 



FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

Free delivery to Amherst of 
any purchase — large or small. 

JOEDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

OfltoaHoUX*: 1-3, M p. m. Sunday and 
other noun* by appointment. 

Croysdale Inn 

>im;TII KADLBI . MASK. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone 2^*- W. Hotioke. 

Cox Sons & Vining 

72 Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

jj j r t% A. for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



RUM'S INN 

Northampton. ftUaaachuaettt 

EUROPEAN FLAN 

1 □• Heat Place to Dine 
AH Hindi of Sea Food 

BperhU luncheon from 11-W to 1 p. ni . 

— -A U carta eerrice — 
t*30a.m. I«II-30».sb. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar L. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Mass. 

FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 




FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orown »y the Florlcultural Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rate* 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums sod sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone JOO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Tible d'Hote Dinner, $1.25 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr- 



TO HOLD JOINT CONCERT 

Musical Clubs to Combine With Those 
of Tufts Jan. 25 in Northampton 

A joint concert with the Tufts col- 
lege musical clubs, at the Academy 
of Music, Northampton, Thursday. 
Jan. 25, 8 i>. m., is the feature of the 
concerts to be given by the combined 
musical clubs of the college for Jan- 
uary, as announced by Manager 
Lipshires. The schedule also calls 
for a concert and dance at City Hall. 
Holyoke, Jan. 12, and a concert at 
Florence, Jan. 10, 

The joint Tufts-M. A. C. concert 
promises to be one of the musical at 
tractions of the winter seasou. The 
management has been fortunate in 
securing this joint concert as Tufts 
have their usually good musical clubs 
this year and are very popular where- 
ever they have been. Among the 
patrons and patronesses will he Presi- 
dent and Mrs. K. L Butterfield, M. 
A. C, President aud Mrs. Alexander 
Meiklejohn, \mherst college, Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Marion Leroy Burton. 
Smith college, and Mayor and Mrs. 
A.J. Morse of Northampton. 

Tickets for the students will go am 
sale by manager Lipshires, Thurs- 
day, Jan. 11, Y. M. C A. (Hike. 

The schedule for musical clubs fol- 
lows : 

Friday, Jan. 12— City Hall, Holyoke ; 
concert 8-9-80 ; dancing until 1 
a. m. College orchestra will 
play. 

Friday, Jan. 19 — First Congrega- 
tional church, Florence ; concert, 
8 1*. m. 

Thursday, Jan. 25 — Joint concert 
Tufts College musical clubs, 
Academy of Music, Northamp- 
ton, 8 P. M. 



BULLETIN ON FEEDSTUFFS 

"Inspection of Commercial Feed- 
stuffs" by P. H. Smith M. Sc. is the 
latest publication of the Massachu- 
setts Station, listed as Control Series, 
Bulletin No. 5. In addition to the 
tabulation of the analysis of all com- 
mercial feedstnffs sold in this state 
'luring the year ending Sept. 1, 1010 
there is a general discussion of their 
feeding value, with comparisons, 
which should be valuable to the farm- 
ers. A special article "Net Weights 
<>f Feeding Stuffs" and a tabulated 
list of the wholesale cost of feedstnfTs 
for the year, based upon the Boston 
rate, also appear in this bulletin. 



VAUDEVILLE COMMITTEE 
That 1917 intends to make a suc- 
cess of their class vaudeville per- 
formance, and at the same time re- 
»f'w an old custom, is shown by the 
appointment of a live executive com- 
mittee in the shape of Philip R. Bab- 
««>ck, David H. Buttrick, Louis W. 
Ross, T. Palmer Wilcox and Ed- 
inund B. Hill chairman. Several 
clever acts have already been solidi- 
fied into a basis for an excellent 
)• rformance, the probable appear- 
ance, of which will take place dining 
flw week of Feb. 12. 



ECONOMICS MEETING JAN. 10 
The Economics dub will bold a 
very interesting meeting on Wednes- 
day evening, Jan. 10, in Clark hall, 
Room B, 7-30 r. m., at which Mr. 
Rutledge of the Economics depart- 
ment will speak ou "The Technique 
and methods of Civil Service exami- 
nations required for admission to the 
Bureau of Markets. Washington, I). 
C." 

This is a very important question 
not merely for those who are contem- 
plating government service, but also 
for thoHe who are desirous to learn 
the technique of government exami- 
nations. Every one interested is 
cordially invited to attend. 



TO PLAY PITTSFIELD 

Owiug to bad ice conditions, the 
fre.shmau hockey game scheduled 
with Ptttsfleld high for last Satur- 
day, Jan. (1, was postponed to uext 
Saturday, Jan. IS. The game with 
Amherst high scheduled for that date 
will be played during the week. 

The freshman squad is composed 
of 29 men, who show possibilities of 
a good team. No cut has been made 
as yet in the squad. A training 
table is being arranged at the 
Dining Hall which will enable the 
men to keep in better condition. 
The team will be given a hard week 
of practice, if the ice holds good, in 
order to whip the team in to shape f<>i 
Saturday'** game. 



Semi - Annual Clearance Sale 



$3 and $4 Derbvs and Soft Hats Now $2 and $2.50 

Aquascutum Overcoats, Regular Price M to $35, Sale Price $20 to $25 

PATEICK MACKINAWS 

Regular Price $ o ami S.2. . . . NOW $7.50 and $8 

Sheep Lined Coats, Regular Price £18 to $21, 

Sale Price $13.50 to $15.50 

—At— 

CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 

For 10 Days Only 



Come i«> us for 



IMPERSONATES A 8HANACHIE 

Seumas McManus in his lecture 
Saturday evening in Stockbridge 
Hall impersonated a Bfcsnachie or 

story-teller, and gave, to an appre- 
ciative audience of about loo, 

samples of the Irish folk-lore. The 
tales he told were KMHC of the myriad 
related about the peat-lire of the 
little cottages throughout Ireland 
to men. women, and children. For 
an hour and a half he kept his hear- 
ers facinnted by hifl tales. He 
closed by recommending to the pe- 
rusal of hi* audience hi* latest col- 
lection of the folk-lore in, "Around 
the Chimnev-Corner." 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

f'OR forty years we hare tendered faithful service. For forty 

" years we have tried In make each year • service mw neatly 

ideal. Thi» untiring effort hat built lot us not only The World*! 

Largest Mai' Order Seed Burnett, but aim a Wodd Wide 

reputation for EfiideBey and undisputed leaderJur,. IV 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee's Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" k brighter and 

bett-i than ever. It is mailed free. A postcard will bring it, 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Building. Philadelphia 



F*««;^*^ 



Itloc* 



tore 



TELL OF M. A. 0. C0UR8ES 

"Boost Old Aggie" spirit prevailed 
at the city hall auditorium, Brockton, 
during the Christmas holidays when 
the Agricultural club of the city com- 
posed of college men met the high 
school pupils. Aggie life and tin 
studies available at M. A- C. were 
the subjects placed before the high 
school pupils by the Aggie men. The 
following men were present ; George 
Erickson 'IH.Birger H. Uoseqtiisl *18, 
Milan Logan r tl, '.uslaf Anderson 
*2o, Conrad J. Johnson '20, Henry 
Hall '-'0. 

During the meeting a cup was 
given the best team of the stale for 
H'l-1 in the raising of market produce. 

Three Aggie men flgmei. Gust An- Qry anf j p anC y Goods and Choice Family Groceries 

ilerson '20, as captain of the team, ■**/ *■ * * 

Milan Ixigan *19 and Henry Ball '20. 



Kx 



Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
per>1 W*.«i>i l Iiri i ■«: -R«3Sit lesitlse^r* unocI 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



liKALRRx IN- 







I 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE6IAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOA HI) <>F EDITORS. 
RICHAKI) W. 9MITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL (>. LANPHKAR18. M'glng Editor 
MILPORO R. LAWRENCE IT. AllllUnt Editor 
WILLIAM SAVILLK, JR. 1L Alumni Editor 



ASBOCIATK Ei>itokb. 

JOHN T. OIZKK 11 

JOSEPH r. WHITNEY '11 
FRANK J. HLNKB'IM 

NATHAN W. (ill-LETTE MS 

ELIOT M. MJiTUM '19 

MVRTON K. EVANS 19 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER 11. Hualneaa Manager 
JAMES C. POWELL 'IS. 

Asalatant Utialneaa Manager 

IUK-.&K R. ROSKUI 1ST IS. 

Advertising Manager 

SubBcription |S.O0 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aaaecond-i-laaa matter at the Aniheitt 
Post office. 

Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Jan. 9. Mo. 13 



Mm 11 criticism, some well-grounded, 
some simply * 'crabbing, " is afloat 
among the patrons of the dining hall 
concerning the reasons for the recent 
increase in the price of board. We 
can only adviBe these discontented 
people to refrain from generalizations 
and half-thought-out suppositions, 
and reserve comment until their argu- 
ments have the force of facts behind 
them. To steal a phrase from Ray- 
mond Robins, "What we need is 
more light and less heat " The facts 
are not yet available, ami until they 
arc, we do not care to express any 
opinion either one way or auother. 
We consider it not beyond our prov- 
ince to ask the patrons of Draper hall 
to do the same until the true facts 
are all gathered. 



be any basis for an argument. With 
this in mind, Adelphia has selected 
as the topic for discussion at Sunday's 
forum the question, Is anything 
wrong with our student government 
and if so,why ? The two expressions 
of opinion recently printed in the 
Coi.lkgian proposing certain changes 
in our preBeut system are, without 
minting words, frankly challenging 
the student government to justify its 
existence. Wherefore that govern- 
ment must either defend itself openly, 
or by a failure to take a stand, admit 
its tiaelessness without an argument. 
We would be hypocritical indeed to 
pretend that it ia entirely useless, but 
no less hypocritical is it to pretend 
that there is no phase of the situation 
which can bear improvement. The 
question proposed is a live one, and 
doubly bo because of the fact that 
the men of the opposition do not in- 
dulge in destructive criticism, but set 
forth a very definite and clear cut 
program, which we believe can event- 
ually be worked out. The issue, 
as we see it, is whether this college 
community can best be led by a group 
of men chosen for their popularity or 
by a group of men chosen to repre- 
sent every elemeut in the institution. 
The coming discussion will be valu- 
able even if it does no more than 
simply clarify public opinion in the 
college, and if every man will Bpeak 
out hia own convictions it will at 
least go down as one of the real signs 
of progress. 



SENIORS AND SOPHOMORES 
WIN THEIR GAMES FRIDAY 



Second Year Men Have Close Call 
With Juniors. Freshmen Lack 

Confidence. 
The 1917 inteiclaaa basketball 
aeries opened last Friday night with 
the Spnioi-Freshman game, in which 
the former were the winners by a 
score of 19 to 12. The freshman 
were Bomewhat wild in their passing 
and lacked confidence. The older 
ten m, which was somewhat heavier 
than their opponents, showed supeiior 
team work and held a safe lead 
throughout the game. Stedman 
starred for the 1920 team, gathering 
in a good share of the oaskete for the 
losers, while the shooting of Mack 
featured for the seniors. 

rllKMIMKN. 



E. B. DICKINSON.D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams block, Amherst, Mass. 

Offlre Houra 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-M to 6 p. m. 



BOYS 



h 



rg. Qni Si 

Itiilit'its, Herman 

c Armstrong 



During Kxams don'i worry aliout 
what you are going to give your wife 
for Xmas. 

We have his brand of tobacco or 
cigarettes in Xmas packages. 

She'll '° ve vou belter next teim. 



Without making a frenzied cry for 
a place to develop intercollegiate 
athletics, without even suggesting 
the need of a place to play big games, 
Professor Hicks has appealed to the 
undergraduate body to finish an Aggie 
project, begun and financed so far 
by Aggie men. The completion of 
Alumni Field is notso important from 
the standpoint of 'varsity athletics 
as it is because it will furnish ade- 
quate recreal'onal facilities for every 
man in the institution. The cinder 
track, tennis courts in plenty, and 
scats for more spectators, all these 
make a proposition so wide in the 
extent of its usefulness to the stu- 
dent body that even the most selfish 
of men will admit that there is some- 
thing in it for him. The self-respect- 
ing roan, and we are notconcerned with 
other types,will make sure that there 
is something in that Held from him. 



Hi i for the fact that every ques- 
tion has two sides there would never 



DR. JOHN M. THOMAS TO 

SPEAK AT SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The speaker for next Sunday 
chapel services is a man who should, 
at least through collegiate relations, 
lie more or less a friend of the stu- 
dent body for he is Dr. John M. 
Thomas, President of Middlebury 
College, Middlebury, Vl. After 
passing a boyhood in his birthplace, 
Fort Covington, N. Y., he received 
his A. B. in 1890 aud his A. M. in 
1893 from Middlebury and was or- 
dsined into the Presbyterian minis- 
try. From 1893 to 1908 be wss 
pastor at East Orange, N. J., during 
which time he studied two years 1893- 
5 at the Union Theological Seminary 
and in 1903 attended the University 
of Marbury. Higher honors were 
still to be bis for Middlebury in 1907, 
Amherst iu 1908 and Dartmouth in 
1909 gave him D. D. and the Univer- 
sity of Vermont honored him with 
LL. D in 1911. Since 1906 he has 
been president of Middlebury Col- 
lege, serving on the State Board of 
Education. He is the author of the 
"Christian Faith" and the "Old Tes- 
tament "besides being a contributor on 
religious subjects to various maga- 
zines. 

FOOTBALL ASSISTANTS 

The following sophomores hire 
been elected assistant managers of 
varsity football % S. P. Batcbelder of 
North Heading and R. D. Chisholm of 
Melrose. 



BXMOK.* 

Korstrom, li 

Mink, rf 

Harlow. c. 

jj aVi iu n. Mcudmaii 

Hijrjjinbotbaiu, Ifl ''• Ball 

Boors -s*niois i'.». PrasbuMS W. Goals 
from floor— Hay, Harlow, Hack a, Sow 

Iroin. I5all. Mediiian. Goal) irom ronls 
|>a% t, Sirilman 4. IrUMlMag 4, 

i;.ii-n« aeale] "' Isahotsl Hiee 
ao - re l nutc balsas. 

The Junior-Sophomore game was 
a much closer contest. The first half 
saw the junior* with a lead of 9 to 6, 
but the orange jerseyed team csme 
back strong in the second half and 
tied the score, necessitating a five 
minute overtime period, in which 5 
baskets were scored by the sopho- 
mores, putting the game on ice for 
them. The shooting of Minor and 
Vickers featured the game. 

SUplloMOMKS, JI'SIOKH. 

BaM'brlder. VL kco.. II nt. Ilahhilt 

Pfttsrson, I row.-. ii l«,«rajr ( I la In bridge 

PUnrksrfl. t e.Cottoa 

William.. Ig rf. Milieus 

Whittle, rtr "• Minor 

Score — Supb-iiniofe* 81, Juniors 18. 
<.<.»]» Irom Hour— Blanobard 4. Crowe, 
Virkerc 4, Minor J, OottOtt. »mj«I» from 
funis - Peterson, Minor «, Ulllette. 
Keferee— Ashley of Amber*!, SO-mln- 
ute halve*. o-mlnaln overtime period. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



FREHHMEN DEFEAT SMITH 
The freshman basketball team 
opened its season bat Saturday Bight 
with a win OW Smith's academy of 
Hatfield by a acore of *6 to 4. The 
visitors did not get a besket from the 
floor and seemed somewhat loot ia the 
large ball, as their home playing sur- 
face is coaaidarably smaller. 

The 1910 defense played a good 
game. The pasting of the team as a 
whole was not up to expectattea, and 
fumbling waa prevslent. 

FftKiUIIIKK ***** ACADEMY 

l,»!hnrp.rf rg.rtuek 

Ulrharoa.BaM.rf.c la. I». By an 

Harrington, •? ■« < * **** 

l«ni.U lfPral J 

Vige»*l, \M*t*. rg rf, ruaek 

Store of u^tpM'A A » 1»W 28: 
Hmlth. 4. itaoU *«»« the lluor l»- 
ihrop 8, BkkaHs », Harrttwfitrri a, Lam. 
Bail. c«.»I« rr..m b»nl* Lathi »n «» 
Kuwk 4, Helen* Vickerw B*. *»• 
BltHUte h»l*e*' 



0£ LAVAL 

Separators 

Save in Seven Ways 

t|UAKTm of «r*ani that no other »«|*- 
i.tnr will aa cO f S t i-oiupletelr 

i/l A MTV or €-rr»n» a* evidenced bjr l»e 
i..iui butter always ■< orlng hurbeat In 
■very inii*>rtaiu conteat, 

I. Alton lii every war over *u> gravity win 
tem or other aeimrator. by turning 
eaaler, being eauler t<i rlwiii and re- 
quiring no ad nutnjent. 

li M K over any ararlty ayates or «*tber a«|i- 
arator. by reaaon of areater t ai*iit> 
and the Miiie re«aona I hat save labor. 

tiJHT In ttoat tbe l>* Laeal will MM finw ten 
o. twenty yean, while other eeparatar* 
wear out and require to be replaced In 
from one to Ave yeara 

I'HOKIT In more and better (-ream, with leaa 
labor and effort every tine milk la pat 

I hrough the machine. 

SATIBF ACTfOX wbleb can enly come front 
knowing joulhave the beet neparatoi 
and ere u all time* aeroBBHahtas the 
beat potMlble reaolts. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



iSft BariAPWAr 
NEW YORK 



»E. MAPianH Si 
rillCAOO 



The Ufa of 

Chilean Nitrate Deposits 

A. D. 1917 

Totaal ) 720 

Nitrate deposits ? million 
in Chile ) tons 



300 
years 



Estimated life 
if deposits at 
present rate of 

WotMs 
consumption 

Fer Reliable Information Writ' 

Dr. Wni S. MYERS, W*ctor 

Chilean Nitrate Propaganda 
Aeoaaa, Nms York 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

I .Notice* for thla column ahonld be dropped In 
at the Com, koi ax office or banded to Nathan 
W. Gillette '18 on or before the Monday pre- 
ceding: each laaue.l 

Wkdnkhuay, Jan. Ill 
2-10 I*. m. — Assembly, President Ken- 
yon L. Butlerliclcl, 

4-15 p. av— /iif/cr Boaa. alumni Field. 
6-45 H. m.— Mandolin Cluh Kehearsul, 

Hoeial 1'iiion. 
T-HU i*. m. — AKrii'ultuia] Bconomles 

Cluh. "Civil Sei\i<e Kxains." 

Tiu'iishav, Jan. 11. 
fl-45 i». M.-Orebestra Ueliearsal, Social 

I'niou. 
7-<Mi v, m.— [>andsi'upe An Club, Wilder 

Hall. 1'roi. ll, ( . Taoatpaua 

spoaksr. 

7-tK) f. m.— Flor'nits and Uardeiieih (lull. 
lYsaefa Hall. Audrey llntler 
ol ltullei and rilinan. N'oiili- 
aiiiptoii. speaker. 

Fit i hay, .1 v.\. 1^ 
7-UU r. m. — Movies leaiuriii" "T.\ '"('old» 
under auspiees Social rnioii. 

Btockbridgs Hail. 
T-lo r. M.-lntei-.-lass l.asketltall. luill 
Hall. I1U7 vs. 1D1H. t'.i|s rs. 

mo. 

7-UU r. m.— Fresliiuan baskotball. IfWP 

vk. Kasihainploii Hiyli at 

rfaoltlSIMOtOW. 

H vn i:u v^ . Aw. UJ 
J ;ill f. M. Fieslinian lloekes llc'ti \s. 

1'illslield on I lie rink. 
.I-.HI r. m. Intonnai in I lie Drill || a ll. 
T-tMl f. m. -Movies at Siockliridiie Hall. 
M KbAI . Jan. 7 

•i-iii v. m. ihapei. Di. ,i. m Taoatas, 

I'resideni ..1 Miiidldliur> ( »)- 
leiie. Midillelmry. Vl. 

MM p. m.— Forum in tat rbapal. suii- 

je« i."U ilieiean\ (hiim wioiiu 
with our nludenl i4«i\elli- 
tnem .' 
MO p. m,-v. M. ( . \ Meeiino. Social 

1'nion. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Henry B. Peirsoo. of Bradfoni. 
Iia* pledget) Kappa Sigma. 

Prof. E. L. Quaife will apeak at 
Ibe Connecticut Agricultural College 
abort course. Storrs. Conn., this 
week. The subject of this lecture 
will be swine. 

Prof. Arno II. Nebrling, head of 
Department of Floriculture has 
recently been appointed state vice- 
president of tbe National Society of 
American Florists and Ornsmentsl 
Horticulturists. 

Mr. Ezra 1. Sbaw of the National 
Forest Service, stationed at Missoula. 
Montana, has been visiting bis par- 
ents in Amherst recently. He is tbe 
author of an attractive article on 
Montana's Newest Pleasure 
' • round," published In the Christmas 
nnmber of the Northrt-Mpjin MotoriM. 



STUDY SICK TOBACCO 

Research work in the so-called 
"siek" tobacco soiIh ia being under- 
taken by the department of botany in 
addition to the field work that the 
department is doing. During the 
winter they will take up in detail the 
bio-chemical ami pathological aualy- 
sis of the soils and plants In one 
end of the greenhouses experimental 
beds have been established. These 
beds have been tilled with the differ- 
ent tobacco soils that have been af- 
fected in our region. In addition to 
that a uumberof pot experiments are 
under way. These have more in 
particular to do with the working out 
of practical soil treatment for abnor- 
mal soil conditions as well as for root 
rot. The department expects to tike 
up again iu the summer the field 
work on the plot*, located in different 
points in the tobacco growing region. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



BASKETBALL MANAGERS. 
The following men hare been 
tinted managers of class basketball : 
W7, A. V, Noyes of Georgetown; 
ltli f W. A. Foley of Palmer j If If, 
K * oderre of Southbridge ; while L. 
Fiillisf of Lowell and L. P. Mai tin of 
M .en are candidates for tbe 1920 
•aaigertttp. 

♦ —"Beer Willie has paid his 
' 'iiKoua subscription. Who's next? 



AGGIE MEN AT WASHINGTON. 

The meeting of the American Civic 
Association in Washington, last 
week, brought together a number of 
Aggie men. A. D. Taylor '()."», ap- 
pealed on I he program, as did \i II 
Francis '10, of Syracuse N. V., and 
Frank H. Cullev '|o, of Ames, la , 
Alfred F. Muller '1l\ who was 
killed the week before, had prepared 
an important paper for the meeting, 
which was read by the secretary. 

Professor Wuugh presided at one 
of tbe sessions and delivered an ad- 
dress. Prof. P. II. Slwood, for- 
merly of the Landscape I lepai'f meiit 
st M. A. C, wss present as a mem- 
ber of the Country Planning Com- 
mittee. Tell W. Nieolet '14, was 
represented in the exhibition of 
country planning work which was a 
feature of the meeting. 



TO LECTURE IN SPRINGFIELD 
Prof. F. C. Sears of the pomology 
and Dr. A. K. Cance of the eco- 
nomics departments are to give lec- 
tures Thursday at the Hampden 
County League conventions at 
Springfield. 

1913 NOTES 

The following 1918 men took part 
in the 4th Annual Conference of 
County Agricultural Agents and 
Vocational Agricultural Instructors, 
held at the college, Dec. l9-23ad. 

Ralph II flask ill. County Ageut, 
Bristol County. Address, Segre- 
ganset. 

Fred D. Criggs, Assistant Secre- 
tary Hampden County. Address, 
Springfield. 

Allister F. MacDougal, County 
Agent, Hampshire County. Ad- 
dress, Northampton. 

John S. Carver, Instructor in 
poultry, Essex County Independent 
Agricultural School, Hathornc. 

Lawrence A 



'!>;-» — W. H. Lewis, who has had 
charge of constructing the Shark 
Hiver Jetties at Belmar, N. .L, has 
accepted a position with Westing- 
bouse, Church, Kerr *s. Co., to build 
a masonry dock and sea wall at 
at Matanzar, Cuba. Address, Apar- 
tado No. 98, Matanzar, Cuba. 

'97. — J. Gerry Curtis is president 
of the .1. (Jerry Curtiss Co. Inc. 
Forestry and Landscape Designers, 
lie is Borough Forester in Wilkins- 
burv, Dormont and Mt. Lebanon 
boroughs iu and about Pittsburg, Ib- 
is also superintendent of the \\ est- 
inghouse Estate En Pittsburgh 

*02.— Prof. C. I. Lewis he id ol 
the Horticultural Depaitment of the 
Oregon Agricultural College is the 
author of a serial article entitled 
"The Physical Handling of Fruit'* 
which is appearing iu "Uetter Fruit" 
tbe fruit growers magazine of the 
North-west. 

'12. — F. B. Hills has resigned his 
assistant professorship of Animal 
Husbandry at Delaware College, and N/|$H BLOCK, 
has taken eharge of the publicity' 
work of the American Guernsey Cat- 
tle Club with headquarters at Peter- 
bora, N ll 

'14. — Nathaniel K. Walker is with 
the I. iimi A. Sweet Shoe Co., of Au- 
burn, Me. He is head of the Plann- 
ing Department, while P. B. l-.atoti 
Fx-'lo is Assistant Sales Manager 
for the same concern. They have 
■in apartment Bl if Elm Street. Au- 
burn, Maine. 

'14. — C. II. Peters bas returned 

from his work in Canada and is again 
at Cooperstown, N V.. with F. de- 
Puvster Townsend. Landscape Anln 
tect. 

'16 — Dwight Barnes was uiairied 
to Mabel Maker, Dec to, at Brook 
lyn, NY. 



THE 



United States Hotel 

lUiiirh, Lincoln MMl Klnovtun sic , 
BOSTON, flASS. 



Onl> two lilnck* Ikiiii Houtti TiTiiilnnl Hte- 
llun, and caalli nwheit fruin North Station 

lis Klevaled Hullwuy, mid ( nnvciiiiMit ilil<- 

III I 111- |il I'll I lflilil:«l|ll|IH!Hlll llll-.|lltMH I IMIIII 

uImi tn tin- iiii-aiics null ptKHnf Interval 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

lihlr mid *VT\ lee 1111*111 |u»iiiil 
ltuiiMrt .1 In I ||H|I a0 II I HI'iiH Hpplli "itliiii 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 

Pr piietor Manager 






WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good Work .speaks (or Itsrll. 

AMHERST. MASS 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 

\Kf*nt* ft** K*'% 1 ^ i«'»f ti#*f 

F. M. Cl'KRAN CM 1 . DVI-K 

MAMSM'S SAMIAKN 

Students' Furniture 

RUOS AM) CAKPP.1S 

k 1 1 mv i;mi 1 -r \ 1 1 

Stephki* Lank Imhi.kh Ire. 

MAWtra*AVrUWII*a rfiri»Rit,aian» 



: hi, MlfiU l>VV A V 



.VRW VORk 



U1ATH A Nil tfH.t.Wirn 

rivs AND itlNi.-H ^ 



milH, •,,,»•»>;« 4 *#», mi ,./r uanii< 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB TO 

INSTITUTE NEW SCHEME 
A well trietl and inccesaful wbenic ' Kea 
is to be iiiHtiiuted by the Laadecapel 

Art Cluh in the form of awtgneil j t itMrai IkIcfi 
tracingH which each man will do and 
hand in to tbe club at each meeting. 
This will insure, at the end of the 
.season, a set of |iIrdi taken from ibe 
different authoritative aonrces which 
would be iftacceeeible to a number of 
the students, due to the prohibitive 
cost and number of volunien required ! 
to get the direree trncing« which the 
set will contain. This idea wa.s car- 
ried out Niiccessfnllv at the Timors- 
itv of Illinois by the landscape men. ; 



- JOIN THE BUNCH AT 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING 

■•■I iivr |.<t,t olhce UpMaafSlgl' 

Pressing aid Cttuiif I SpCiW(| 

-n Tat r» *• 



College Stationery 

With Class Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and JHatloaer 



APPOINTS OIFT COMMITTEE 

With tbe idea of making 1017 die* 
tinctive among tbe alumni as a gift 
clasa, the following committee has 
been appointed to investigate and 
Kevan, Instim tor, H11 j MM v \ Hl , t |,,. |,iirch:»8c and presenta- 
Norfolk County Agricultural School. t j on n f gc Iaeegifti Alfred Booth, 
Address, Walpole. Horace Marchant, Richard W. 



B. A. Ltindgren, Agricultural In- 
■tractor in the high school, Orange. 



Smith, William Thayer and Kolam 
W. Rogers chairman. 



Gallup at Holyoke 

J *Jl-sj7 H«rH hi 
- HKI.I.s 

Hart Schaffner & 
Marx Clothes 

» ortip down lo llolyfike amd !W» ««uf 
big more 















I 






Wfflb'" 



j 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

» 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Prescription* Filled. Broken Lenses 

Accurately Replaced, hine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Evei y 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

American ami European I'lans 



" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our Specialty -And other good things to eat, 
MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOri.AK KUNDAY SKRVICK AT 1 P. «•■ 

Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

IWTEOPATHH' PHYSICIAN 

305 LAMBIE BLD6., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 
TeleptwtM 

IllV VOI H 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etc-., of 

A, W, HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I call at the Worms ami Fraternity Houses. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe. Valves 
ind Fittings for Steam, \* ater and Was, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water HjatiM, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boilei and Engine 
Connections. Holyoke, Maw. 



COLLEGE ASKS LEGISLATURE FOR $488,200 

Library, Dormitory, and Many Improvements Called for in 

Annual Budget. 

LEGISLATIVE BUDGET FOB 1017 AS APPROVED BY THE BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES. 



Library, 

Equipment and Improvements, 

Poultry Building, * 

Student Dormitory, . 

Dining Hall Improvements, 

Rural Engineering Shops, 

Power Plant, Turbine House, Steam Line Tunnels, 

Total, 

Following is a brief statement from | a few years ago, 
President Butterfield of the need for available for 



$250,000 

75,000 
1,200 

50,000 

10,000 
9,000 

90,000 

$488,200 



Middle Street, 



Tel. 415-W 



Hadley, Mass. 



The Highland Hotel 

Comer of llillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Deoot, is • modern hos- 
Teh-y run on the Kuropean rW It 1 just » s ep 
from M.i in Street, away from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its room* are well furnished arid comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices • I and up; rooms 
with bath (single) •!.»«» and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and wel! ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant '^ m °^ v '" r n ¥ H 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

Highland Hotel, Sprlngdelrl, Mnee, 

WHITE'S MUSIC STORE 

1IKNKY K. WIIITK 

mi Mam erase*, nomthamitok 

Mandolin*. Genuine Hawaiian Ikuleles. Picks. 
Strings, etc.. and umsle for all Instrument* and 
all valets. Instruments mar be had OB trl;.l. 



HIICKMAIV'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

'* HAMP" 



Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the time to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 



funds were not 
construction of 
suitable storage facilties in the base- 
ment. The need for these has be- 
come more distressing each year, 
but no relief has been granted by the 
Legislature. The project, :ia now 
outlined, contemplates the construc- 
tion of a separate storage for pota- 
toes, storage for one hundred tons of 
coal, and a complete refrigerating 
plant for meat, butter, eggs, fruit, etc. 
the college staff is* Rural Engineering Shop., $9,000. 



the appropriations as requested : 
Library-$250,000 
In my report last year I dwelt at 
some lengih on the very pressing 
need for adequate library facilities. 
I feel that I can do nothing more this 
year than to reitterate those argu- 
ments, and state that the need is 
even more apparent today than a 
year ago. 1 think the consensus of 
opinion among 



uir 



vour Bulletins. 



Johnson Book Go. 

Babbitt Woouworth 

Alpha Siuina Phi HoUSO. 



iiilM* 

Illlltll l iHag 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS \ND POULTRY DRESSF.RS 

tTHOMfiai.lt om.\ 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau 
sages, Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



'H 




A 



BlaukMuite. North iui'i Sorta ( i-iiii. streets, 
BOSTON, .... MASS. 



SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local Agent for 

H V PRICE CO., LAMM CO., BROWNING, KING A CO.. 

Custom Tailors 

OUK DISCOUNT TICKET SAVKS YOU 5% 



{arptrvUr & Morehous*, 
PRINTERS, 

No. 1, Cook Place, Amherst, Mm 



that a new library represents the 
most pressing building need of the 
institution. 
Equipment and Improvements— 

$75,000 
For three successive years the leg- 
islature has made inadequate provis- 
ion for much needed improvements 
and new equipment at the college 
The requests for this year, therefore, 
represent accumulated needs. 

Poultry Building-$4,SOO 
The equipment for the poultry de- 
partment is still far from complete, 
dee in part to the fact that this work 
was undertaken in a large way only 
six years ago. A much needed addi- 
tion is a poultry breed and judging 
laboratory, 20x104 feet, which will 
provide a poultry bouse containing 
twenty-four small pens and laboratory 
space for general demonstrations; 
also a large room on the second floor 
adequate for the accommodation of 
t wenty.fi ve to fifty students in work 
in judging poultry. 

Student Dormitory —$60,000 
This is the seventh successive year 
in which the college has asked the 
Legislature to provide funds for a 
small dormitory. At a time when 
student expenses are increasing 
materially, due to the high cost of liv- 
ing, it would be extremely desirsble 
from the standpoint of the college to 
check the increasing living expenses 
in some small degree by affording 
comfortable living accommodation* 
on the campus for a larger percentage 
of its students. The plan, as pre- 
sented, will provide a dormitory to 
house fifty students, and estimates 
indicate that the building will pay a 
fair percentage on the investment 
represented, as well as provide rooms 
at a relatively low cost. 
Dining Ball Improvements, $10,000 
When the dining ball was remodeled 



The Legislature of 1916 appropri 
ated $1*2,000 for the construction 
of a one-story factory type of build- 
ing for laboratory work and instruc- 
tion in rural engineering. Whereas 
this provides the initial equipment 
for work in rural engineering, the 
building is not yet adequate. The 
expenditure here contemplated is for 
a unit 82-ft. x 126-ft. providing a 
forge strop and an additional room 
for field machinery. By the addi- 
tion of this unite we would l«? able 
to offer a complete court* of instruc- 
tion in the repair of farm equipment 
including forge work. It will alw. 
enable us to bring together into 0M 
laboratory all the farm machinen 
used for instruction purposes. The 
work is rural engineering is appre- 
ciated by the students, and the large 
number who elect the conreea are 
making unusual demands upon the 
department, particularly with re- 
spect to laboratory faculties. 
power Plant, Turbine House. aa« 
Steam Line Tunnels— $90,000, 
Owing to the buildings which hate 
been erected at the college afiioe the 
power plant was built, some «igb* 
teen years ago, the requirement* 
made upon the plant have been in- 
creased many fold * thus, eondiliooi 
at the plant are in need of prompt 
attention if efficiency in heating aaC 
lighting is to be rendered, In th* 
boiler room there is st prrteesl no 
emergency equipment. 

Minor changes in the ©Mtfrwtfoii 
of the present plant will be invo'el 
in the installation of this apparatus. 
The total coal of this equipmenl wiS 
be approximately $86,000, 

It has been found that the lo- 
tion can generate Its own electr 
at a coat which represents * ■ ■•' 
saving over the price which would 
paid if purc h a sed outside of 



ite 



college. With the additional demands 
made upon the lighting system, due 
to new buildings, another dynamo is 
necessary, and it is proposed to 
install this in a separate turbine 
house to be constructed north of the 
present powerplant. The cost of the 
turbine house, dynamo, switchboard 
and crane, together with the cost of 
installing these, would be approxi- 
mately $29,500. 

It has been necessary to make 
Borne rather extensive improvements 
in certain sections of the present 
underground steam line, and the 
engineer deems it advisable to under- 
take these repairs and alterations, 
looking somewhat into the future. 
We are asking, therefore, for an 
appropriation of about $24,000, for 
initial improvements. The plan con- 
templated for 1917 is to construct a 
concrete tunnel from the power plant 
to the drill hall, a distance of about 
1400 feet. In this connection it will 
be necessary to replace about 1150 
feet of the steam line uow used in 
this locality. 

MARKET GARDEN STATION 



Equipment and Improvements— 

$25,000 

Maintenance to Be Available Until 

Dec. 1, 1918— $10,000 

The Legislature of 1916 appropri- 
ated $8,000 for the purchase of land 
to be used for a Market Garden Field 
Station under the direction of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
A site has been selected in Lexing- 
ton, Mass., snd the purchase will be 
consummated at an early date. For 
properly improving this area and for 
providing suitable equipment for the 
prosecution of experimental work in 
market gardening, an appropriation 
of $2;"), 000 is requested. A sum of 
* 10,(100 is requested for labor and 
other maintenance costs for a two- 
year period ending Dec. 1, 1918. 



SK VERAL CHANGES MADE 

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

1. The Physical Education De- 
partment requires of Juniors, Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen three hours per- 
week of supervised physical exer- 
cise for seven fnll weeks beginning 
Ian. I, 1917. 

2, Each student must register for 
one of the following forms of physi- 
cal exercise and continue in that 
branch for the entire seven weeks : 

s. Indoor Clssses. 

These classes are offered every 
day but Saturday 10 to 11, 11 to 12, 
^ to 8, and 3 to 4. 

Students electing this form of 
exercise must indicate on their reg- 
istration cards the three sections per 
w*ek that they will report. No stu- 
dent will be allowed to elect succes- 
sive sections. 

Attendance will be taken at 
' -nty minutes past the hour. Each 
ffi^n is required to wear the regula- 
' 1 suit of white running shirt and 
puts and white rubber-soled shoes. 



Kach man is expected to take 
a bath at the close of the period. 

b. CrosB County Walking. 
Treks will start every Saturday 

at one p. m. from Drill Hall. Ten 
treks will be conducted. Each stu- 
dent electing this form of exercise 
must take seven. 

c. Track. 

Men electing track must re- 
port three afternoons each week, be- 
tween three aud five p. m. To get 
credit each man, when ready to go 011 
the track, must report to men taking 
attendance in the locker room. 

d. Hockey. 

Men electing hockey muBt re- 
port three afternoons each week be- 
tween three and live P. m. Attend- 
ance will be taken at the rink every 
half hour and each man must report 
to man in charge in order to get 
credit. 

If at auy time there is no ice, 
attendance will not be taken but the 
required number of hours will have 
to be made up at the end of the sea- 
son. 

e. Basketball. 

This heading includes Varsity. 
Freshman and Interclass teams. The 
practice hours of these teams are 
posted in Drill Hall. Men electing 
this form of exercise not outfitted 
with a team uniform must wear the 
regulation indoor uniform. 

f . Special Exercise. 

Students elect this form of ex- 
ercise only upon advice of the Physi- 
cal Director. Regulation uniform as 
above stated will be required if ex- 
ercise is taken indoors. 

:i. The grade given for the work 
will be based upon attendance. Ab- 
sences, not excused, will reduce the 

term mark. 

More than two absences from 

classes will constitute a failure. 
Students electing cross county walk- 
ing and failing to take seven out of 
the ten treks offered will fail the 

course. 

No make-up work will be per- 
mitted. 



RAISE TUITION 

Tuition and board at Mt. Holyoke 
college will cost $500 a year begin- 
ning with the next entering class, it 
has been announced by President 
Woolley of that institution. The 
action of the trustees in raising the 
fee was attributed to the increasing 
cost of living and of maintaining the 
institution. The college has not been 
able to pay its running expenses by 
means of the endowment fund and 
the fees paid by the students. 

The college it was announced, will 
make every effort to assist those to 
whom the increased amount might 
make a college education impossible 
The present rate at ML Holyoke is 
$425, of which II 50 is for tuition and 
$275 for board and room. 



SHEEP SKIN GOATS AND ULSTERS 

at the lowest prices in the state. Incidentally we have the best 
assortment that you have seen. 






Custom Made Reversible Collared Shirts 



From $1.25 to $4.00 



Some real values. 



Freshmen Toques, 60 Cents 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5 2 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mesa 



Main Office: 

15461 548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the beat skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



DID YOU RAISE 300 BUSHELS OF 
POTATOES PER ACRE THIS YEAR ? 



If you did not you are losing pari of your profits. 
Potaloes at almost *2.oo per bushel are the most 
profitable crop on the farm. Our book, 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

will insure your full profits. Write to-day for 

your copy. 



Local Afvaer JtaaaSer 
THE CQE-WORTIMEB C0MFAKT, 51 Chambers St., Wew TorH City 

SHlmidlary of On* Atinrli-an Agriiultural C SSBiteSl Co. 

Manufacturer, of £ FRANK C0E FERTILIZERS 
1857 fSVSuilaw *■«■•«* Standard f»r SiKty T«ar» 1917 



UWAVJAV. 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1917. 



1916 NOTES 

"Lather** Verbeek is enrolled as in- 
structor of agriculture at Proctor 

Academv, Audover, N. H. Also 
teaches some mathematics and couches 
tlie athletics there. 

The hoy a are drifting WestO. K. 
Here's Dick Potter, discovered at 
16M Wisconsin St., Racine, Wis. 
Wish we could quote hia whole letter 
—it's done right, believe us. Dick 
is conuected with the the J. 1. Case 
Plow Works. 

1916 men should begin marking 
Feb. 9 and 10, 191 7, in the little red 
memorandum books aa g date for ap- 
pearance ou the campus. Alumni 
Day is coming "lie There !" 

The class of 1916 has paid its hist 
out-ataudiug bill, and now owes no 
living mortal even a new dime. Hut 
1G of the 'lG's men owe '16 $77.^8. 
That would help a lot toward the 
Hig Reunion. The conscience fund is 
now open. If your conscience pricks 
you write to Oould M. A. C for in- 
formation pertaiuing thereto. He 
will break it to you easy. 

Frank L. Davis, agricultural in- 
structor, lock box 1 1, Harwich. Mass. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College mmm PEN s 



Otters courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Economic Botany 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Moore's $wan'» 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Carlton Upham has been in Sand- 
wich. Mass., for the past six months 
as assistant to the editor of the 
Sandwich liuhjxoideuL 

Sanderson is workiug in the Arnold 
laboratory of Brown university in 
research bacteriology. "Sandy" is 
trying to rind an organism wl.ich will 
bleach cloth. 

"Jim" Hicks reports that ou Oct. 
:\ there was born a husky heir to the 
throne, named Chester SputYord 
Hicks. Jin is teaching iu Wilbra- 
huin academy. 

"Tich" Whitney writes that he is 
poultry mauager for the Hirchfield 
farms, South Dartmouth, Mass. On 
April 14. 1916, Miss Dorothy Ben- 
nett Jenkins, Ethical Culture college 
17, of Ml. Vernon, N. Y , mid Mr. 
Harold Tiehenor Whitney were 
united in marriage. 

"Let*" Fielding, care of Aluminum 
Cooking Utensil Co., Boston, Mass. 
He has his name on the company's 
stationery, which has a "made good" 
look to us. 

"BUr*Brastl,269 Lafayette avenue, 
Brooklyn. N. Y. The prosperous 
farmers of Long Island are buying 
fertilizer of Bill, who is with the 
American Agricultural Chemical Co. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercol. Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non- Athletic Association, H. 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteeu Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

lnterclass Athletic Committee, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454-W 
H. M. Gore, Secretary— 4U8-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer— 4U3-M 
E. Robbins, Manager— res. 62- W 

It. T. Buckman, President — 416 

J. A. Chapman, Manager— 8314 

R. D. Hawley, Manager— 8314 

O. S. Flint, Manager— 544-11 

M. R. Lawrence, Manager— 8347 

N. Moorhouse, Manager— 8:164 

S. F. Tuthill, President— 416 

A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 

D. M. Lipshires, Manager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8317 

K. M. Buffura, Manager— 8.164 

1). O. Merrill, President— -i 1 6 

J. H. Day, President— 8377 

L. T. Buckman, President— 4 1 6 

M.J McNamara, President— 580 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 834 7 



ATTENDS CONFERENCE 
Prof. Curry S. Hicks of the phys- 
ical education department attended a 
series of annual holiday conferences 
under the auspices of the Society of 
Directors of Physical Kducation at 
New York for the purpose of consid- 
ering intercollegiate athletics and 
physical training. At a later meet- 
ing of the National Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association at Columbia Uni- 
versity over 200 colleges were tcpre- 
seuted- 



Thertare SffM Hood Keaions why you should 
buy your 

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or 

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WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass, 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CU$*t only frmn i A M to 4 A. M 



The Connecticut Valley 

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From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mile* of Trackage Hodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
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press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



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We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR OERT. 

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THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave AOQIE COLLEdE lor HOI - 
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CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEUE at 7 and J7 mln. neat the hour. 

IfKWCtnit 



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All woik carefully done. Work «»^J° r "J 
delivered. G«nt»' overcoat*, suit*, pant» »no 
coats Ladies' fine linen suite a speciajte. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. b 

WM. FRANKLIN, Hro|» 
Rear Naah Bl'k, Amherst. TsL No 34» ♦ 



Amherst 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
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are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



CO-OP LAUNDRY 

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- /■ 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 16, 1917, 



HOCKEY SEPTET TO MEET 
SPRINGFIELD TOMORROW 



Game to be Played on New Rink. 

Probable Lineup. To Play 

Dartmouth Saturday. 

Springfield Y. M. C. A. college 
will meet M. A. C. tomorrow, Wed- 
nesday afternoon, at 9 :15 in the first 
hockey game of the season for both 
teams. The contest will be played, 
in all probability, on the new rink on 
Alumni field, which has been worked 
over steadily during the past week in 
an effort to get it in good shape. 

As to the prospects for the game, 
little can be prophesied with any de- 
gree of accuracy, because of two 
reasons, — comparative lack of prac- 
tice and the necessity fot using 
much material heretofore untried in 
varsity contests. Of the strong 
septet which represented M. A. C. 
last year all but two were loBt by 
graduation, Captain Buttnck '17 at 
the goal, and L. W Ross '17 at 
point or cover point. With men of 
their ability as a nucleus, however, 
the defensive element will be well 
cared for, with the assistance of 1). 
Hobs '19, who works with his brother 
st point or cover point. 

On the offensive, Richardson '18 
and Seavey '19 have been tried out 
in the wing positions with Stiles '17 
and Chisholm '19 at rover and center. 
This seems to be the probshle line- 
up for tomorrow's game. Harwood, 
Hunnewell and Thorpe *18 have been 
substituting in the wing, and R. P. 
Holmes '18 on the defense, and these 
men may yet gat into action. Hard- 
ing and Mansell "111. leaders in fresh- 
man hockey last year, are ineligible, 
as is Dowd These men have beeu 
practicing with the squad daily. A 
long practice session was held on the 
Alumni field rink Saturday morning, 
and a two-hour scrimmage was held 
yesterday afternoon, with encourag- 
ing development showing. 

Springfield has as yet played no 
■ "ie. and their practice has been lim- 
ited more or less. Jenkins, the fast 
right wing of last year's team, now 
captains the visiting team, and a 
lively contest is cer» ,n. 

Hie team will leave for Hanover 
Friday noon, to meat Dartmouth 
there the next day. The showing of 
the Green thus far has proved them 
one of the strongest teams iu New 
England. In their first trip of the 
[Continued on pe#»» I 



EXCELLENT LIST OF ALUMNI 
SPEAKERS FOR FEBRUARY 9 



Hazen '10, Ooldthwaite '85, and Tap- 
per '05, Among Those Mentioned. 
Students and Faculty Urged 
to Attend. 

Mr. Myron S. Hazen '10, presi- 
dent of the Coe-Mortimer Fertilizer 
Company of New York will be one 
of the speakers at the Alumni Supper 
at Draper Hall the evening of Feb. 
9th. Mr Hazen. while making his 
way to the Presidency of one of the 
largest fertilizer concerns in the 
country during the last six years, 
has not lost sight of Aggie nor the 
problems of a college man. He is 
certain to have a message full of en- 
thusiasm, encouragement and will 
undoubtedly bring some live ques- 
tions for M. A. ('. men to think 
about. 

Dr. Joel K. Ooldthwaite 'H.') and 
Bertram Tupper '0"», County Agent 
for Plymouth County will also have 
something worth consideration of the 
undergraduates. Other speakers will 
he announced later. 

All members of the faculty are in- 
vited to attend the gathering which 
promises to be the one big College 
Night of the year. All students not 
eating at the Dining Hall are urged 
to take in this Alumni Supper even 
though they happen to be boarding 
elsewhere. There will be entertain- 
ment by the orchestra and quartet, 
as well as mass singing. A good 
live evenings entertainmeut is being 
provided for. Keroeinl>er the date, 
Friday evening, at D-tB at the 
"Draper." 

PLAN TO GET PERMANENT 

RESIDENT SECRETARY 

Through the influence and backing 
of a number of prominent alumni, M. 
A. C. will soon have a permanent 
resident secretary for the student 
Young Men's Christian association. 
Dr. Joel E. Ooldthwaite *86, of Bos- 
ton presented the plan before the stu- 
dent body in chapel Friday morning. 
Among the prominent alumni who 
are backing this new proposition are 
President Daniel Willard ex-'82, of 
the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, C 
F. W. Fell *86, chief engineer of the 
Santa Fe system, Newton Shultis '96 
of the Boston chamber of commerce, 
.John K. Wilder '82, of Chicago. 111., 
j William D Russell *71, of New York 
1 city, Dr. Joel E. Goldthwaite *8fl, of 
Boston and Atherton Clark *78, of 
I Boston. 



BASKETBALL SEASON TO OPEN 
SATURDAY WITH C. A. C. GAME 



First Intercollegiate Game Since 1009 
Comparative Record and Line- 
up of Teams. 

In a game which promises to be 
replete with good playing on both 
sides, M. A. C. starts the first inter- 
collegiate basketball game since 1 909, 
with Conn. Aggie at the Drill hall, 
Saturday, Jan. 20, at .'{ h. M. The 
s<)u:ul has been practicing hard for 
the past month, and Coach Gore haa 
rounded out a well balanced team. 
which only needB a little experience 
to weld it into a powerful quintet. 

The team wdl be handicapped 
somewhat in Saturday's contest by 
the fact that this will be the first 
game of the season. C. A. C, on 
the other hand, has already played 
three hard games with strong col- 
leges, and besides has a veteran team. 
However, M. A. ('., because of its 
versatile, consistent playing, is sure 
to put up a strong game with every 
prospect of success. 

A brief review of C. A. C. games 
thus far is interesting. Wentworth 
Institute was tieaten by the quintet 
from Storrs "i6-I3 { later, Wesleyan, 
undefeated this year, after a hard 
fought contest on her own Boor, was 
able to win by 38-21 ; while recently 
N. H. State, with the best team in 
the history of that college, was able 
to defeat the Connecticut players 
82-23. From the above it can easily 
l>e seen that Saturday's game prom- 
ises to be hard fought throughout. 

M. A. C. will probably Htart the 
game with Captain Orayson at cen- 
ter; Pond or F. Grayson as right 
forward ; McCarthy or Squires left 
forward *, right guard, Parkhurst or 
Pond, and left guard Sedgwick. 

The students will have a chance to 
see the team in action on Wednesday 
evening, 8 r. m., when team A will 
play team B. Robert Westman, 
cheer-leader. will conduct the 
cheering. 

The probable line-up of the two 
teams on Saturday is as follows • 



No. 14 



M. S. i 

Pond ht F, < i ray son. rf 
McCarthy or Squires, If 
k, i ii.ivHiiu (capt.), c 
I'Rrkhiirpt, Pood, rn 
Sedgwick, Jg 



rf, Barluw 

If, Dickinson 

Norton (capt.) 

rif, Tonry 

iK.Traurijr 



To facilitate approach to the new 
microbiology building, the grounds 
department has constructed a stair- 
way leading from the lower road. 



F.K.BAKER AWARDED PRIZE 
FOR NON-ATHLETIC SEAL 

Design Symbolical of N. A. A. Activ- 
ities. Emil Cuba '19 Men- 
tioned as Second. 

The Non-Athletic Hoard has made 
its award for the best design, repre- 
senliug the various branches of non- 
athletic work, the eompetition for 
which has been going on for the past 
six months. Foster K. Linker 'IK of 
Fairbaven was awarded ten dollars 
for his design, which the board placed 
first; second choice being given to 
Kmil Guba *\$ of New Bedford who 
teceived five dollars for bis design, 
from which several features were 
taken which will be incorporated in 
theollicial design itself. 

The seal is indeed neat and attrm 
live. The upper section ia repre- 
sented by scroll, book, musical pipes, 
etc., each of which is symbolic of var- 
ious non-aihlc'wC activities such as 
literary work, debating, musical clniw 
and dramatics. In the renter is the 
lettei "M" which will be in gold 
The words •'Non-Athletics" "M. A 
C." will appear on the lower portion 

All medals awarded by the Non 
Athletics Hoard in the future will beat 
this new design, which should be an 
added incentive for all men to engage 
in the various branches of non 
athletics at the college. 

NEW CAR SCHEDULE 

Sevsral Change* Made in Running 
Time of Hoiyoke and Sunder- 
land Cars 

Due to a recent ruling of the 
Holyokc Street Railway Company 
the schedule of cars for Amherst has 
been changed considerably. Cars 
now leave Amherst for Hoiyoke on 
the half hour until 14*30 P. m. Cars 
leave Hoiyoke for Amherst at 2« 
minutes past the hour, running hourly 
until 1 1-W P. m. The 1 1 -28 car from 
Hoiyoke waits for the ll-l. r » train 
from Springfield. Printed below is 
the schedule of cars from the cioss- 
walk to Amherst center. 

Amherst for H.A.V.mni North its 
karat- 6-flft, Ml, 7*00, 7-:w>, h-oo, h i;. 
u-15, MS, 10-15, iu-:su, i lift, I MM, 

12-80, 12-4f>, and at half pr*sf ami i|iiarl«i 

pasi tin- hoar until in;{n. then st II <<■ 

anil 12-Hll A, M. 

crosswalks fur Amherst iii annul 
H-2H. «-4«, 7-'i3, 7-W, h-oh m-;;h ;i.|s 
o-jw, 10-88, lo-:w, U-«B, 11-37, 12 £J, Mis. 
ami at H minutes [taut and l'.', fiast until 
10-OH, then nt 10-ftH ftn«l 11-39 I* M. 






I 



2 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



SOPHOMORES WIN FROM 

SENIORS IN FAST GAME 

Puts Second Year Men at Top of In- 

terclass Basketball Standing;. 

Juniors Lose to Freshmen. 

The sophomores continued their 
winning ways in the M. A. C. inter- 
class basketball series, by defeating 
the seniors 19 to 8 last Friday night. 
The victory gives thern a clean slate 
<»f two victories and no defeats. 
The seniors and freshmen are at a tie 
with one victory and one defeat to 
their credit, while the juuiors are in 
last place, with no victories and two 
defeats. 

The sophomore-senior game was 
fast and both teams were aggressive 
throughout the contest. The sopho- 
mores exhibited the most of their 
"fight" in the second half, also scor- 
ing the majority of their points in the 
latter session. The inability to make 
fouls count proved to be a big handi- 
cap to the seniors, as only four out 
of 20 chances were caged by Mack, 
while Vickers lost only seven with the 
same number of chances. 



JUNIOR PROM PRELIMS TO 

GO ON SALE WEDNESDAY 



BOPHOafOBIM, SKMons. 

Virkers, If rb, HftjiobothaiO 

PMemoBi Hate elder, rf 

ll>. Day, Qoldateifl 
Ulamliiird..' < , Mack 

Williams, H' r *. Kelsey 

Whittle. rl» If, IluHtrmn 

Score — Sophomom ll». seniors 8. 
llasketslroni BOOT— VU-kers,l$Ht«-helder, 
Whittle, Kelsey, Mark. Fouls- Maek 4, 
Vickers 13. Fouls missed — Mack Hi, 
KftlMJT, Vu-kers 7. Ueferee— .Swalield. 
Time— go-minute h;ilv<-. 

The junior-freshmen game was a 
much tamer affair as there was little 
real basketball exhibited by either 
team. The score stood 6 to 3 in 
favor of the juniors at the close of 
the first half, but effective playing by 
Hall and Armstrong pulled the 
younger team from behind in the last 
half. The contest furnished much 
excitment during the final minutes of 
play, however, when, with only a 
short time to play the score stood at 
a tie and baskets by both teams 
caused much enthusiasm among the 
cheering sections along the side lines. 
The game ended with the freshmen 
in the lead bv a score of 13 to 10. 



Promenade to Come February 33. 
Committee Desirous of Early Sale 

of Tickets. 
Preliminary tickets for the Junior 
promenade will go on sale Wednes- 
day, Jan. 17, in room 6 North Col- 
lege. The price of the prelims will 
be one dollar. All men who intend 
to go to the prom should buy these 
early so that they may make out u 
satisfactory dance order. The price 
of prom tickets will be as usual ten 
dollars, or nine dollars with a prom 
prelim order. 

The prom committee is very desir- 
ous to get at least sixty men to signify 
their intentions of attending the 
promenade this year. Due to the in- 
creased price of decorations, music, 
programs, etc. the expenses will run 
unusually high. Sixty paid couples 
will mean that the class just breaks 
even, less than sixty, that the class 
goes in debt. Last year there were 
only forty- two paid couples at the 
prom. Less than fifteen juniors at- 
tended their own promenade. This 
is a very poor showing, to say the 
least, and it is hoped that this year all 
classes will make a much belter at- 
tendance. 

The decorations for the prom will 
probably be iu the form of a formal 
garden scene. The promenade will 
come in the evening of Feb. 23. 
MuBicwillbe furnished by Wittstein's 
orchestra of New Haven, In the 
afternoon there will be a hockey game 
between M. A. C. and Williams on 
the college rink. Saturday afternoon 
there will be a cabaret dance in the 
Drill Hall and in the evening the 
Roisier Doisters will present the 
comedy "The Arrival of Kitty." 

If there are any men who are con- 
templating going to the prom but 
have difficulty in getting a room or 
arranging for board, the prom com- 
mittee sincerely hopes that they will 
report all such trouble at once, The 
prom is open to any one who wishes 
to attend, regular students, specials 
or short course men. It is hoped 
that all classes will be well repre- 
sented. 



KHESI1MKN. 

Kail, If 
Graves, if 
Armstrong, <• 
LUtlerleld, lb 
Herman, rb 



.11 NIOKS. 

rb, Qraji 

lb, Ual>l>it, Kennedy 

«•. Cotton, Chambers 

rf. Gillette 

If. Minor, Francis 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 



FOR generations we have served 
the college men "and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

g>nrirttj Iranh (Blatipn 

Free delivery to Amherst oj 
any purchase — large or small. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



.Score — Freshmen 18, juniors 10. 
Baskets from floor— Bill 8, Armstrong 
8, Graves Gillette 2, Cotton. Fouls- 
Hall 3, Gillette 4. Fouls missed — IJall ft, 
Armstrongs, Minor, Gillette 8, Ueferee 
— Swaflelu. Time— 20-minute halves. 



BECOMES EXTENSION AGENT 
R. W. Henninger '17 of Williams- 
port, Pa. has been appointed Exten- 
sion Agent in charge of the Poultry 
Club Work of Massachusetts. Hen- 
ninger has been very prominent in the 
poultry work of the college ; he was a 
member of the poultry judging team 
and was secretary of the market 
poultry show last year. 



PROFESSOR NEHRLING HAS 

SEVERAL OUTSIDE DATES 

Professor Nehrling, head of the 
department of floriculture, in addition 
to his class work, is much in demand 
as an outside speaker. On the even- 
ing of Jan. 25, he is to address the 
Worcester Horticultural society on 
the subject "Practical Management 
of the Home Flower Garden." Feb. 
S, he will give an illustrated lecture 
in Boston before the MaB*. Horticul- 
tural societv, using as his topic "Per- 
ennials We'bhould Grow." Many of 
the slides he will use in the illustra- 
ting will be of material in the depart- 
mental garden so that the affair will 
favor stronglv of M. A. C. March 
5 and 6 he will spend at the Univer- 
sitv of Maine, in a series of talks on 
"The Development of the Floricul- 
tural Industry in America." 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale Inn 

SOUTH HADLRY. MAMS. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone ifuffl-W . Holf ok«. 

Cox Sons & Vining 

•ft Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowds 
Hoods 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St. Holyoke, Mas, 

FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 




FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Grown by the Florkultuml Dcpt. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rites 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

(JROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton Maaaacliutettl 

EUtOPEAN FLAM 

Toe liesv Place to Dine 

AU Hindi ef See Feed 

BfjeciRi luncheon from 1140 tolp.m. 

Ala cart* wreiaa— 

6-30 a. m. to 11-30 p. m. 

R. J. RADAR, Prop. 



The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 

Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Mil's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table d'Hote Dlnmr. $1.25 

GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



STUDENT FORUM 



Live Discussions on Student Govern- 
ment. Many Good Ideas 
Brought Forward. 

At the Forum, held in the old 
chapel, Sunday afternoon, there was 
a serious and thorough discussion of 
student government as it exists today. 
There was considerable criticism of 
the senate, pro and con, there was 
not the hesitancy about expressing 
ideas which has been noticeable in 
previous forum meetings. A new 
method for electing the seuate was 
suggested ; by which each of the 
nine fraternities would elect one rep- 
resentative to the senate, the Com- 
mons club would elect two represent- 
atives — that is, each unit of 30 men 
is represented by a senate member — 
and one senator for every 30 unorgan- 
ized students would be elected. This 
system, it was thought, would bring 
the senate into closer relation with 
the men and make it a more truly 
representative body. When this 
suggestion was put to a test vote, 
however, the Forum favored the pres- 
ent form of senate by a vote of 66-13. 

After some discussion the follow- 
ing recommendation was made to the 
seuate : that a committee of three be 
selected from the senate to investi- 
gate student government at other 
state colleges with conditions similar 
to M. A. C. Jt was further recom- 
mended that the senate put their find- 
ings before the entire student body 
at s forum . 



SENATE MINUTES 

[Kditurs' note — At the request nil he 
iiillefie Senate the Com. if.i an will luic- 
after publish the minutes of all Senate 
meetings.] 

A special meeting of the Senate 
was held Sunday morning, Jan. 14 
Grayson, Chapman and Messenger 
were absent. The proposal of Pio- 
fessor Hicks and Chairman W. 1). 
Hurd of the Celebration Committee, 
that Pageant Master Langdon work 
up and stage a spectacular student 
performance with Alumni Field as 
the theme, was considered. Voted 
to meet with Mr. Langdon to deter- 
mine how much time it will require of 
the students. 

Voted that Westman draw up rules 
for the establishment of the Cheer 
Leader Competition on a firm and 
standard basis. 

Voted that the Infirmary Commit- 
tee inquire further as to the advisa- 
bility of an insurance tax, getting ad- 
vice as to some exact amount and 
the Dumber of days' treatment it 
would entitle the student to. 

The recommendation of Adelpbia 
that the Freshmen be allowed to 
wear hats and caps other than the 
prescribed Freshman bat on street 
cart when leaving town, and on Sun 
day, was read and rejected. 



08.— Roland H. Verbeck is attend- 
ing the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion of Harvard. Verbeck spent his 
•itmmer vacation at Flattsburg. 



TUFTS-M. A. C. CONCERT TO 

BE A RECORD-BREAKER 

Much enthusiasm is being shown 
on the campus over the joint concert 
of the musical clubs of Tufts and the 
Massachusetts Agricultural colleges 
which is to be held at the Academy 
of Music, Northampton, Jan. 25. 

Although other college organiza- 
tions, such as Dartmouth, Harvard, 
Tech and Williams, have visited 
Northampton, this is the first time 
in its history of 31 years that a Tufts 
college musical organization has 
visited the western part of Massa- 
chusetts. 

It is with an entirely different 
spirit that the rival organizations 
meet. On the athletic field there is 
the keenest competition, but here we 
find instead the mutual feeling of 
co-operation to help make the affair 
a musical triumph. 

Tufts college has always been 
famous for its musical clubs, and the 
Boston Herald is entirely fair when 
it recently published that "Tufts has 
one of the best college musical clubs 
in New England." Their reputation 
has been built on mainly u speciali- 
zation in humorous numbers. This 
year's program is no exception. 

The Tufts' clubs have recently re- 
turned from a very successful trip in 
New Hampshire, Maine and Ver- 
mont. Everywhere they met with 
the entire appreciation of all audi- 
ences. The CiaxemoDt, N. II.. 
Daily EutjU- says, 4 The concert at 
the Town Hall was a decid d suc- 
cess in every way." The Burlington, 
Vt., /'Vcf /'reus tmd Tnncs says, "It 
was more than a concert, it was an 
all around entertainment." 

At Northampton the Tufts musical 
program will consist of six glee num- 
bers and two reading selections. 
The M. A. C. clubs will present 
three glee club numbers, two mando- 
lin club selections, and also special- 
ties by the quartet, Hawaiian sextet 
aad a solo by Harlan N. Worthley, 
the leader of the glee club. Taken 
all in all this joint affair promises to 
be one of the bright spots in the his- 
tory of the M. A. C. musical clubs, 
as well as in the musical program of 
Northampton for the season of I1M6- 
1917. 



"THE VILLAGE DOCTOR" 

John Thomas Concert Company to 

Give Sketch Saturday Evening 

In Auditorium. 

The John Thomas Conceit Com- 
pany will present the sketch "The 
Village Doctor" Saturday, at 7-00 
p. m., in the Auditorium, under the 
auspices of the Social Union Com- 
mittee. John Thomas is a well- 
known comedian and was very well 
received when he was here in UH.">. 
To those who have social union tick- 
ets admission will be free. The 
price of tickets for the public will be 
fiftv cents. 



■09, —Elmer F. Hathaway is in the 
wholesale bakery business with his 
father in Boston. 



Semi - Annual Clearance Sale 



$3 and $4 lierbys and Soft Hats Now $2 and $2.50 

Aquasculum Overcoats, Regular Trice $zS to $35. Sale Price $20 to $25 

PATRICK MACKINAWS 



Regular Price $ o and $12, 



. Now $7.50 and $B 



Sheep Lined foals, Regular Price $18 to $21, 

Sale Price $13.50 to $15.50 

—At— 

CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 

For 10 Days Only 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Alw.'.ys glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING A HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



re* 



forty y*ri we h«*e rendered faithful terwice, hot forty 

• yeara we have tried to make each year'i *er*ice more neatly 

ideal. Th« unttnnj effort hat built lor u* n«jl only The Wor!d*» 

Large* Mail Order Seed BlIIJMII, but all© a World Wide 

reputation for Efficiency and uadbpyled leadefthtp. The 

Fortieth Anniversary Edition of Burpee'* Annual, thr 

"Leading American Seed Catalog*' is brighter aad 

better than ever. It is mailed free. A poMcard will bring it. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Building. Philadelphia 



Largest Stock— Lowest Prict -^ 
Expert I-*** i>*tl ■'!■■«:— I3c?»t KMitlieruniMl 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALBRS IK" 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS CftLLNIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOAK1) OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Rditor-ln-Cblef 

MARSHALL <> t.ANl'HKAR'IS. M'gtng Editor 
MILKORD K. LAWRENCE 'It. AMlitsnt Editor 
WH.T.IAM 8AVILI.E. .IR. '17. Alumni Editor 



\rtr,i.c i \ i k Bt»rtx»B». 

HiHN I. I>l/K|{ 'H 

.lORKl'll K. WHITNEY 'IT 
FRANK .1. HINKR '!• 

NATHAN W. (ill. I. KITE 1H 

ki.iht m. rorruM •!» 

MYRTON K. EVANS »» 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER IT. Huiineil M»ni|«r 

JAMES C. TOWKI.I. 1*. 

AsiUtant KuainDM Manager 

BIROER R. ROSKUITST '1». 

Advertising Manager 

Subscription $:>.»H> per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aaiecond-.-laaa mattar at the Aniberat 
Poat Offica. 



Vol. XXVII. Tuesday, Jan. 16. Ma. 14 



Ask any "loyal Aggie man" and 
he will tell you that this is the most 
democratic college thisside of Utopia. 
■ veritable hotbed of democracy. 
Some of us now are beginning to 
speak of the traditional Aggie democ- 
racy, unconsciously inferring that it 
exists only in the dim recesses of the 
past. Perhaps that is a rather mor- 
bid view to take, but can a man be 
blamed for thinking thoughts like 
these when ho sees so much convinc- 
ing evidence? Take as an example 
the inteifrateinity relay schedule. 
Does that look democratic? Appar- 
ently the non-fraternity men are not 
good enough to run against the 
(ireeks, or can it be that they 
are too good, and consequently 
in danger of winning a cup? It is 
only a small matter, this confining 
the contest for the cup to a strictly 
fraternity participation, and in doing 
so the fraternities were perfectly 
within their rights From the stand- 
point of a fraternity man, however, 
we cannot but express our disgust at 
the pitiful Braallnef s of mind which is 
here exhibited. If the men who set 
themselves up to be above the com- 
mon herd have not sufficient breadth 
of vision to see the folly of this form 
of exclusiveness, then "traditional" 
is the best adjective to describe 
democracy. 



body who was able to give his whole 
time to the direction of its work. 
Through the generosity and interest 
of certain alumni, this present lack 
will be supplied. What the alumni 
ask in return i» no more than fair 
and reasonable, namely, that the 
students enter into full co operation 
with the new secretary when he comes, 
and help him to build up a worth 
while work here on this campus. 
This means something more than just 
"moral support," in fact the Y. M. 
C. A. is already suffering from too 
much of that misnomer, which mani- 
fests itself so easily in hymn-singing 
but lacks the punch when it comes 
to leading boys' clubs or doing depu- 
tation work. Moral support is a 
pretty wobbly foundation for any 
organization, most of all a Y.M.C.A. 
What the new secretary will need 
when he comes is a body of men 
willing to give more than they can 
ever expect to get, men with person- 
ality and leadership, who will make 
some sacrifices for the good of the 
work. With real backing from such 
as these, Aggie can show her alumni 
that Bhe is awake to her opportuni- 
ties and responsibilities, and co- 
operates with them in workiug for 
the best type of manhood she can 
turn out. 



Things are apparently moving. 
Meanwhile we are conteut to watch 
for results. 



f 



We do not believe there is a man 
in college so contented with himself 
and the world that he would not wel- 
come the advent here of a real live 
Christian Association such as Dr. 
Goldthwaite proposed Friday. With- 
out getting down to personalities we 
can honestly say that that type of 
organisation does not exist here 
now and h*a nVt for some time, prin- 
cipally because of the fact that there 
was noone outside the undergraduate 



When a hundred Aggie men dis- 
cuss a subject for two hours and a 
half, speakiug frankly and handling 
delicate matters without gloves, that 
in itself is an accomplishment worthy 
of some comment. Sunday's forum 
was the first real discussion that has 
taken place outside of small groups 
this year. It brought out some ideas 
and facts that were pretty generally 
unknown and still more which were 
well known but had uever before 
found public expression. This, in 
our mind, was the big object, and 
whether the new proposals won or 
lost was of comparatively little con- 
sequence. Since it is the opinion of 
the majority that no change in the sys- 
tem of student government is desir- 
able at this time, we shall ally our- 
selves with those who purpose to 
make of the present system a more 
efficient means of directing student 
opinion. Their idea is first of all to 
inquire how large a measure of self- 
government is enjoyed by other col- 
leges having similar problems to 
face, with a view to increasing the 
powers of the senate on the basis of 
facts, not fancies. They clearly 
demonstrated that without more 
power, thiB governing body, no mat- 
ter how chosen, can govern only in 
name. It has been further proposed 
to the senate that a modified form of 
the initiative and referendum be 
adopted by them to bring about a 
cloaer relationship between the stu- 
dent body and their chosen represen- 
tatives. Both the foregoing ideas 
should find ready response on the 
part of the senate, and if adopted 
will do much toward clearing away 
the fog in which it is now shrouded. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notice* for ttata column ahould be dropped In 
attheCoi.i.MiAit office or handed to Nathan 
W. Gillette '18 on or before tbe Monday pre- 
ceding eacb laatte.l 

Wkdnknuay, Jan. 17 
2-10 p. M.- Assembly, Dr. W. I>. Weath- 

erford, Nashville, Tenn. 
ft>15p, m. Hockey game Varsity vs. 
Springfield. 

4-J0 p. «.— -Basketball. Kreshman vs. 

Hopkins Academy !■ Drill 

Hall. 
".-(HI e. m. — Uelay ttaees. lnlcrfraler- 

niiy. 
0-45 e. m.— Mandolin Olub Rehearsal, 

Social Union. 
7-00 p, il.— Microbiology Chili in Micro- 

bioloff* Laboratory. 
7-oo p. m.— Btockbrtdgc Club. Mr. 

Barwood "7~>. 
7-:lo p. m. - agricultural Rconoailea 

Olub meeting. 
K-00 p, m.— basketball. Varsity Team 

A vs. Team B. 
Friday, .Ian. 19 
.-.-00 p. m. — Interfraternity Keluy Kates. 
7-00 p. M. — Interclass Basketball, Drill 

Hall. 1911 vs. HUH, IMP vs- 

1020. 

Saturday, Jam. 20 

Varsity Hockey, M. A. < . vs. 
Dartmouth at Hanover. 

•2-H0 p. m.- Freshman Hockey 1020 vs. 
Drury Hlfffc. 

:t-00 p. m.- basketball, Varsity vs. Con- 
necticut Biggie in Drill Hall. 

7-00 p. m.- Freshman basketball. 1020 
vs. Deeritold Academy in Drill 

Hall. 
7-00 p. m.— John Thomas Concert Com- 

pany at Btoekbridge Hall. 
Ni m>ay, Jan. 21 
0-10 a. m. — Chapel. Sidney A. tiold- 

stein Of Free S> DUgOgUe, New 

York City. 
0-00 p. m- Y. M. ('. A Matting, Social 

Union. 



E.B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block. Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-30 to 6 p. tn. 



THE BIG FOUR 

Black and White Cigars, 5c 

Black and White Little Cigars, 15c 

Black and White Tweenies. 10c 

Black and White Cigarettes, 10c 

If you have not tried them 
you have missed something. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



TELLS OF PLANS FOR 

ANNIVERSARY PAGEANT 

At Wednesday Assembly, Jan. 10, 
William Chauncy Langdon, who is to 
write and direct the pageant for the 
fiftieth anniversary of the college, 
told of his work and plans for the 
production. In nature the pageant 
will probably be a drama consisting 
of the following episodes: The 
Puritan period with its ceaseless 
struggle with tbe Indians, disease, 
and the rigors of New England 
climate ; the Homespun period with 
its homesteaders raising all their 
food and clothing on their little 
farms; 1862, the age of agricultural 
awakening, the foundation of agri- 
cultural colleges like M. A. C, the 
beginning of scientific research in 
agriculture and the extension ser- 
vice ; consecration to the future of 
our college, state and nation. The 
most important of these periods is 
that which witnessed the foundation 
of Old Aggie under the Morril Act 
passed during the trying hours of the 
Civil War by the action of President 
Lincoln himself. Under the able di- 
rection of Mr. Lsngdon who has suc- 
cessfully staged similar dramas for 
many occasions, the pageant will un- 
doubtedly be the feature of the cele- 
bration. 



01 LAVAL 

Separators 

Save in Seven Ways 

i|UANTJTY «f cream that no other m-i«- 
rator will recover completely. 

QI'ALITY of cream aa evidenced bjr l>e 
I .;, v ;il butter always •coring' highest in 
every Important contest. 

I, AltOK In every way over any gravity »y»- 
teni or other separator, by turning 
easier, being easier to clean and re- 
ituirtng no adjustment. 

TIMK over any gravity system or other s»p- 
iirator. by reason of greater rapacity 
and the same reasons that save labor. 

t < >8T in that the lie Kateal will last from ten 
to twenty years, while other separators 
wear out and require to be replaced In 
from one to five years 

I'ROKIT in more and better cream, with less 
labor and effort every time mllklts put 
through tbe machine. 

SATISFACTION which can only come from 
knowing you&ave the best separator, 
and are at all times accomplishing the 
bent possible results. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



1ST. Bhoapwav 
NEW YORK 



•.".< K. Maihso* St. 
CHICAGO 




IT TAKES 400.000 cars to carry 
American Fertilizers to Farmers 
and Plantersevery season, Fortv 
per cent of this is useless Filler r J 
quiring 160,000 canst Insist on hav- 
ing less Filler and all high grades 
with Available Nitrogen, namely: 

Nitrate of Soda 

and thus cut freight bill*. 

Crop production from such FertiHwrt 
rn'-ans greater outbound tonnage lor read* 
■ad bigger purchasing power for Farmer; 
Railroads and everybody wouid benefit 

Larger food crops thus grown wat»k ! 
give increased prosperi ty to all It is op to 
you, Mr. Fanner. 

Send Mr "Cert el AvaHrtk Nitrate" " 

DR. WM. S. MYERS 

Dirnfr, ( hiua* Numtt frepaiamd* 

Sf Madtaoa Avenue Mew York 

No Branch Ofvicks 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



SPEAKERS FOR THE WEEK 



Sunday Chapel. 
Dr. Sydney S. Goldstein of the 
Free Synagogue of New York City 
will address ths students at Sunday 
Chapel, Jan. '21. Dr. Goldsteiu 1ms 
been prominent in the Jewish relig- 
ious workers of New York state, lie 
has been uuder the famous Jewish 
leader. Rabbi Stephen Wise, as an 
assistant to that able social and relig- 
ious worker. He Bhouhl have an 
interesting and unique message to 
Aggie men. 



Wednesday Assembly 
Mr. Joe Mitchell Chappie of Bos- 
ton, editor of The National Magazine 
will addiess Wednesday Assembly. 
.Ian. '24. Mr. Chappie was born in 
Iowa in 1867. He received the de- 
gree of A. M. from (irinnell college. 
Iowa in 1904, and in 1915 the degree 
of L. I,. D. from Lincoln Memorial 
University. His chief interest has al- 
ways been along literary lines. Indeed, 
he began newnpaper work at the age 
of sixteen by editing a paper at Grand 
Kapids. Later he became the editor 
and proprietor of the Ashland Daily 
/Vess which he still owns. He con- 
tinued his newspaper work in Chicago 
until 1897, at which time he took 
charge of the BostonUlM and changed 
the name of this periodical to The 
National Mmjaune. Mr. Chappie 
did not con line his alteration solely to 
newspaper and periodical writings for 
he has written numerous books, 
among which aie "Heart Throbs," 
"The Panama Caual," and "Mv 
Wanderings." 



FRESHMEN DEFEAT AMHERST 

The Freshman Hockey team came 
through with a win in its initial game 
of the season which was played with 
Amherst High, on the pond last 
Wednesday. The learns were at 
dead-lock at the end of the first half, 
both sides having scored one goal. 
However, during the second frame, 
the clever stick work of Hall netted 
the 1920 team two goals giving them 
a'so a safe lead, which they kept 
throughout the remainder of the con- 
test Line-up and score : 

I'KKSIIMKV. AMIIhlihT IIM.il. 

DoUCetl*', K if, < %* ley 

HeddinK. Douglas, < p 

p. Bush. lla»bmuck 
Mellon p p. Sanctuary 

craft*, r r, Dickinson 

Ball.tf <\ I'u.al 

.Johnson, r » I w. Toole 

Uedding, 1 w i w, Uullis. 

Score — Freshman ;i, Ambers! I, froals 
first half, Dickinson (A) B mm.; 
' rafta (M), 10 min. ; second half, Dick* 
MM (A) 1 mln.: Ball (M), U min. Re- 
feree — Bntterick *17. Tirm — l"> min. 
halvt- 



GREATER BOSTON BANQUET 

Two hundred alumni and 150 un- 
dergraduates at the big get-together 
on March .SO; this the plan of the 
Massachusetts Alumni Club and the 
Grealer Ronton Undergraduate Club. 

Dr. Joel K. (loldthwaite 'Sn, the 
president of the Alumni Club, ex- 
pressed his hearty approval of the 
new plan of a co-operative Aggie 
gathering, while he was at the col- 
lege last week. 

"It is sura to lie the biggcHt event 
of the year. We greatly appreciate 
the action of the Alumni Club Di- 
rectors, which has brought about thin 
opportunity for 'boosting old 
Aggie." "say the olli.iis of the Un- 
dergraduate Club. 

Details and arrangements hav« not 
been announed as yet, but it is sure 
that the combined musical clubs will 
be present. 

Tin- following committee has been 

elected to aid in planning for the 
banquet : Weslinan '17, Chapman 
'lx, Worthies- '|H, S. S. Smith '18, 
liaxter '19, Faxon '19. Hunker '20. 



ALUMNUS TO ADDRESS 

THE STOCKBRIDC.E CLUB 

PBter M. Ilarwood. M. A. C. '7.'», 
will addresH the Stockbridge Club 
Wednesday evening at 7-00 in Room 
114 Stockbridge Ilia talk will be 
illustrated throughout by lantern 
slides. 

Since graduation from college Mr. 
Harwood has been extremely inter- 
ested in the dairy business. Me has 
been more or less of a practical farmer 
running abmii (00 heads of registered 
stock. Kor a tune he was Professor 
of agriculture at Michigan and for the 
last eighteen year* has been dairy 
agent for the state boaid of agricul- 
ture. He is to talk on his observa- 
tions, both in the dairy business and 
in general agriculture, as ihey have 
appeared to him abroad and at home. 
The lecture will be over in time for 
the basketball game scheduled at H-00 
p. H. 



1916 NOTES 

Preparation of agricultural copy 
is among the duties of T. Carlton 
I 'imam on the Kitchbcrg tkt&f .W»ics, 
the reporting stall of which he 
recently joined, lie will also con- 
duct an editorial department. Mt. 
Ipham went to the ffeies from the 
Shawm ft*n of Sandwich, a Cape 
Cod syndicate publishing tbe Sand- 
wich independent and seven other 
local papers. 



BOTANY OLUB TO MEET 
The regular meeting of the Tucker- 
man Botanical club will he held at 'A 
i*. k, Thursday, Jan. 18, in Clark 
hall. Wise Aimer Stokey of Mt. 
Holyoke college will speak on "The 
Work of Stephen Hales " All those 
interested are cordially invited to 
attend. 



SCORE SUCCESS IV HOLYOKE 
The combined Aggie musical dubs 
gave a very successful concert in 
Holvoke eilv hall Fiidav evening. 
Jan. 12. Kvsry number on the 
program was encored. Kspecially 
pleasing was the solo work of Harlan 
N. Worthley, leader of tbe glee 
club. The attendance was gratify- 
ing, as over 1000 tickets were sold. 
The program closed with the CUetOffi- 
ary "Sons of t >Id Massachusetts" by 
the entire clubs. Dancing followed 
the regular program. 



FRATERNITY PLEDGES 

< >nly nine men were pledged to 
fraternities at the second pledge dav 
Monday morning, all but two being 
from the freshman class. They will 
be eligible to initiation with the men 
pledged last October. The men 
were pledged as follows : 

u. T. V. 

Carroll W. Hunker "20, Somerville 
Robert L. Jones '10, North Kaston 
Willard K. French 'lit. Worcester 
Dean W. Sanborn 'IK, Nantucket 

Al.l'llA BtQlU Mil 
Guy MacLeod '20, Lowell 

BETA KAI'l'A Mil 

Irving E. Gray *20, Wood's Hole 
LAMBDA < hi vii'HA 

Hairy L. Dixon 'SO, Barrieeiilc 

Theodore M. Hill '20. 

•lefferson Valley, N. Y. 
Ileniy K. Lyons '20, Rockland 



W I I.NI-MiAV. .1 \ -.. 17 

i.luM.l. KARKYMORK in " iiih (JUITTKR 

Till KHI \\ . .1 \ \. 1h 

Tllll\!\s Ml.ll HAS :inil ANITA KIM. In 

"TIIK IIKIH TO TIIK KOORAM." 

KaittAi , Jax, is 

THJCOA BAR A in Hl.lt lux mi, I till.' 

Sui UPAY, Jan. -1> 
l.l« I I M.I is In "TIIK HW who STOOU 
BTtr.L.' 
Mujtn *v , .1 \n 

< LARA hi Ml! XI I .Mil Ml In Nil Mm U.I S II 
Vim.lV" 

I I IHI'II. .1 i\ 

AtSttM'ie-IIAVAKAWA In soil. o| hi in 
R \V 

PLAZA NORTHAMPTON 



K0W IS THE SOLE WITH YOU ? 

I.il >nni »Imh'" l.i|i|ii i| at 

GINSBURG'S, Amity St. 

\\ urfc lawtt)) tiiMM' s.iit.i.i. t iuh irimraiiiiwnd 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 
Gents' Furnishings 

lull Dress Suits to Rent 
Caps and Gowns for Sale or Rem 

Also Ladies' Tailoring 
Out Wofk ia Guaranteed 

v» • ■!., i»>.inLi i 'leaning, RttsUrtae •""' Pwssfc^ 
I'IIom; SRMI 

1 1 AMITY STREET, AMHERST, MASS. 



The wise ones read 

our advertisements 
It pays. 

Kvcry young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious — or In 

"dead one." 



< >ur specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

JSERBITT CLARK & CO., %%£££ 

WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH ? 

Make it on one of out small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

l-.isy to care foi and no danger of fire 
Alto a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



THE 



United States Hotel 

iii'ai'ii. i.iiicniit ami Kingston RM , 
RObTON, rtASS. 



Onl> Ihu liliirks from Smith liTinlnul Ht4i 
thin, unit easib nwlit'd frotu North Htatlm, 
liy r.li'\ii(i>il lt,,l!«av, hikI coini'iilciit bIIIih 
tn tin- u'H'iit ii't:iilM»,|>H:inil IitiHlneiMM'fntti' 
alio> in the theutioH ami |>]a, i>« ,>r Itttvfwl 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

Tut>l* .nul «i*r\M*t' iiii*iii p.iHfti'd. 
BiHtkh'? mil maji*riit tiftuii iti>i>!if*Ht inti 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photograph \ 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 



NASH BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 



I ounlain Perm 



t£4*fti£ f'H k'**'\ I \ (•#'« | l!i*l 



F. M. CURRAN 



C. F. DVIk 




M \kstr.x SANIIAKV 

Students' Furniture 

Rids AND CARPETS 

I 1 1 M \HHII WH I I 



I' -T. ....... I mrj 

Stkimikn Lank FoLOXV. inc. 

tOMITAI'I'I'MtMl .IWVU.Ht' 

l»M> IIK(MI>W,\ V. N'KW VOKK 

i'l^HII A. Nil « i»l. I, I 1,1 
I'INK AND KIMiH # 

mil,n. ari.vwtt »>«i» Mlt<t<rKN «tai>Al.M 

JOIN THE BUNCH AT — 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

M«» toe*t»d »*«r po»t '>thrr t'|i on» flight 

Pruslng aid Cliwlpg i Specialty 

> ttMtti Tlekct SysUw lei. J6- M 



College Stationery 

With Clans Numeral*. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and stationer 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



Gallup at Holyoke 



*«a*»97 High Si 



SELLS 



Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down lo Holyoke and «ee our 
big slorr 






f l 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER «& OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
Oculist*' Prescription* Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Keplaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quirt and Comfortable — Every 

facility Tor 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

1 mericaii nod European Plan* 



« BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Out Specialty— And other Rood things to eat. 
MKS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 41 5- W 

The Highland Hotel 

Comer of Hillinan and Harries Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot. i« • modern hoi- 
telrv run on the European Plan. It is iust ; step 
from Main Street, awav from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business distiict. 

Its I mi mi ire well furnished *nd comfortable, 
ha»init a telephone and hot <nd cold running 
water in every room. Prices »t and up; rooms 
with bath (single) BI.IM" and up. 

Itsesc^llent cuisine a- i *" v ventilated dining 
mom makes a meal a peasant ineoior v-every 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and vou will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RBOITI.AK MUNOAY SKBVIfJK AT 7 P. H, 

Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

OHTKul'ATHU I'llYSM IAN 

305 LAMBIE BLD6., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone 
111 V VOI i; 

Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etc.. of 

A. W, HAMLIN. AMHERST. MASS. 

I call at the liornot and Fraternity Houses. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and BlW»Plp«. JMg 

and Fittings for Menu. W atei ana (jl, \soestos 
and Magnesu Holler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to sketch. Mill Suprhes. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot VVatei Heating. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boile. and Kngir-e 
Connections. Holyoke. Maaa. 

Candies and Ice Cream 



•• IIAMI 



» »» 



WITH THE FACULTY 

Prof. Frank A. Waugh of the 
horticultural and landscape garden- 
ing departments is the author of an 
authoritative and well balanced article 
entitled -'Unhyphenated American 
Fruits" which has appeared in the 
last two issues of the Country 
Gentleman representing in a more or 
less summarized form, the history of 
the development and future prospects 
of our native small fruits. 

Prof. Robert J. Sprague of the 
department of humanities is the 
author of a one aud two-thirds column 
letter-article in a recent issue of the 
Springfield Repuhlkan entitled "Mili- 
tary Training and Camp Life" in 
which he discusses, as a by-product of 
a national defence policy, the physi- 
cal, intellectual, social, and patriotic 
advantages derived. 

In reply to Dr. Sprague, Professor 
Waugh yesterday had a one column 
communication in the Republican 
assuring his readers that the benefit!* 
and good results obtained fioni com- 
pulsory training in draw poker would 
lie just as great as those derived from 
military training. 



Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the time to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletins. 



To bring some western ideas east 
and take some eastern ones west Pro- 
fessor Nehrling of the floriculture 
department is attempting to arrange 
an exchange professorship with the 
University of Illinois whereby Pro- 
fessor Dorner of that institution will 
spend a week or longer at M. A. C 
while Professor Nehrling is taking 
care of the work at Illinois. 



SEED JUDGING TEAM GETS 

THIRD IN SPRINGFIELD 

G. L.Sargent '17 carried off the 
the honors as the highest individual 
scorer in the field crops judging con- 
test of the New England Agricul- 
tural colleges held at the winter 
meeting of the State Board of Agri- 
culture Thursday, Jan. 11, in the 
Auditorium of the Municipal Group 
at Springfield. Sargent had a score 
of 95.4, against 1)2.3 scored by his 
nearest competitor, R. N. Fitch of 
New Hampshire State. Both of 
these men were awarded cups by Sec. 
W. K. Wheelei of the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

The team representing Aggie, 
which was made up of G. L. Sar- 
gent '17. S. F Tuthill'17, P. W. 
Latham '17, placed third with a 
final score of 2665. The aggrega- 
tion from New Hampshire State se- 
cured first place, scoring 2744, 
Storm Agricultural college of Con- 
necticut second, scoring 2682, Uni- 
versity of Maine fourth with a total 
of -'658, aud the University of Ver- 
mont last with a final standing of 
2484. Rhode Island State was not 
represented. Three men made up 
the team representing each college. 
The contest included seed identifi- 
cation, seed judging in respect to 
quality and adulteration, as well as 
the placing of different classes of 
corn, potatoes and grains. 

New Hampshire State, the winner 
of the contest, was awarded a beauti- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



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ful cup, given by the coaches of the 
different teams, who acted as judges. 
Prof. Earl Jones of the agronomy 
department represented the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college. 



LAUDS M. A. C. COURSES 

ON RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Prof. Sanderson of Chicago Places 

College as a Leader in New 

Field of Science 

After a careful study of "The 
Teaching of Rural Sociology" 
Dwight Sanderson of the University 
of Chicago declares that, "The 
Massachusetts Agricultural college, 
under the inspiration of President 
Rutterfield, remains the only institu- 
tion which has endeavored to furnish 
a complete series of courses in rural 
sociology for those wishing to take it 
as a major subject." 

The article, appearing in the Jan- 
uary number of the American Jour- 
nal of Sociology, indicates quite con- 
clusively that Rural Social Science, 
which President Butterfield defines 
as "the application of the principles 
of the social sciences, especially of 
economics and sociology, to the 
problems that confront the American 
farmer," is being recognized as a 
logical part of an agricultural educa- 
tion. 



Sixty-four per cent of the 48 land 
grant colleges are teaching rural so- 
ciology. President Butterfield, in 
1904, as president of the Rhode Is- 
land college, gave the first course in 
rural sociology given in any of the 
land grant colleges. As the colleges 
of agriculture begin to see that their 
effort should be devoted to the eleva- 
tion of country living, these courses 
are being established. Prior to 1910 
hardly a dozen institutions were 
teaching rural sociology, and fully 
half of those now offering courses 
have established them within the last 
three years. 

Since 1908 the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural college has beeu the leader 
in the careful, thorough development 
i of courses in this science, so 
I that today it may be looked to 
by the 99 other institutions in 
the country, interested enough to 
teach the subject, as an authority. 
And, concludes Dwight Sanderson, 
"the interest in the subject is 
genuine, for, though originally in- 
spired bv a few prophets of the rural 
awakening, it now engages the keen- 
est interest, not only of all progres- 
sive leaders iu country life, but of 
increasing numbers of people on the 
land." 



INTERFRATERN1TY TRACK 
TO COMMENCE WEDNESDAY 

The first races scheduled in the new 
interfraternity track series will be run 
off Jan. 17, when Q. T. V. will run 
Phi Sigma Kappa. From that date 
races will be ran Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays until the schedule 
is completed. Rules governing the 
races are as follows : 

1. All races will be run in the 
order scheduled and will be held on 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
afternoons at five o'clock . 

2. Only such men as are approved 
by Varsity Track Coach Dickinson 
shall be allowed to compete for the 
different fraternities. Pledges shall 
be allowed to compete, 

3. Each fraternity mast compete 
on the day scheduled. There will be 

The schedule for the interf raternitv 



no postponements except on approval 
of the Interfraternity Conference 
Committee and then only when all the 
scheduled races for a particular day 
must be postponed. 

4. The officials for the relay races 
will be furnished by the Interfrater- 
nity Conference ( ommittee and will 
act under the supervision of Coach 
Dickinson. 

5. Four men will constitute a 
team. Each man will run two con- 
secutive laps in a race. 

6. The Interfraternity Conference 
offers a suitable trophy to the frater- 
nity winning the highest percentages 
of races. 

8, Each fraternity shall select a 
manager for its team who shall act 
with the Track Committee of the 
Conference. 

races is as follows : 



Q. T. V. # 2 K KZ K T * B K ♦ 8 X Z » E A I A AI4 



Q.T. V. 



Jan 17 Jan 10 Jan 24 ,lan2fl Jan 31 Feb 2 Feb Feb 
1 ill 1 3 1 ' 



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1 



Feb? Jan*2 Jan 26 Jan l» Jan 81 Feb fi Feb 14 
13*2211 



K £ Jan 10 Feb 7 

a 1 



K I' -J- Jan 24 Jan 22 Feb 12 
1 8 1 

IK* Jan 2» .Tan 26 Jan 17 Jan SI 

12 2 3 

8 % Jaa SI Jan 19 Jan 24 Feb 7 Feb 5 

1 S 2 1 3 



Feb 12 Jan 17 Jan 24 Jan 2« Feb 2 Feb.'. 

1 I 1 1 I __£_ 

.I.ni31 Feb 7 Jan 17 Jan 20 Feb 2 

I 2 8 2 2 



Feb I Feb 7 Feb 12 Jan 22 

3 8 3 2 

Feb 12 Jan 29 Jan 20 
S 1 3 



1#E Feb 2 Jan 81 Jan 26 Jan 17 Feb 7 Feb 12 
8 18 8 3 2 



Jan m Jan 24 
1 I 



AX A Feb 9 Feb 5 Feb 2 Jan 29 Feb 12 Jan 22 J an S8 Jan 19 

1 1 1 S 3 1 1 ' 



A 2* Feb* Feb 14 Feb fi Feb 2 Jan 22 Jan 20 .Ian 24 J an tt 
g 1 11 g 8 3 1 



Ken- The lower numbers Indicate the order in which the rates ot a parti, 
ular afternoon shall be held. 



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The Mo— rhnnctte Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1917. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

U r ».— Albert I). Taylor has an- 
nounced his engagement to Miss 
(ieuevieve H. Brainerd of Lakewood, 
Ohio. Miss Brainerd was graduated 
in 1911 from the College for Women, 
Western Reserve university. After 
graduating from Aggie Taylor took a 
master of arts degree at Cornell uni- 
versity. He is now located in .Jack- 
sonville, Fla., where he is following 
his chosen profession of landscape 
architecture. 

•06.— W. C. Tannatt, Jr, has 
resigned as town engineer of East- 
hampton. He has formed a partner- 
ship with others to conduct a gen- 
eral engineering business with otlkes 
in Boston and Kasthampton. 

•OS). —Charles H. l'utnam is again 
teaching at Lahasuahina school, 
Lahaina, T. H., after having spent 
the summer in New England, where 
he visited many of his classmates. 

•09. — The Guernsey herd of V. P. 
Krasier and Sons, Ipswich, Mass., 
which is under the management of 
B. F. Barnes, won many ribbons at 
the National Dairy Show in Spring- 
field. 

•15.— Lieut. Ralph E. McLain left 
Saturday, Dec. 30, 191i>. for Fort 
Leavenworth, Kans., where he will 
attend the Army Service school for 
three months. He has been assigned 
to the 84UJ U.S. Infantry by a recent 
order of the War department. He 
served with the troop* on the Mexi- 
can border last summei . 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College F0UNTAIN pens 



Offers curses o( instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture. Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Economics 
Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Sociology 



Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



C A. Peters, Secretary — 451-W 
Associate Alumni, ,, ■ h. M. Gore, Secretary— 403-M 

Joint Committee on lutercol Athletic, "• T, e asurer-403-M 

\i a f Athletic Fie d Association. *■>* s - *»"-*»» **" w 

M. A. U Atnietit rs».w ^° Bobbins, Manager— res. fe2-W 

Non- Athletic Association, »'• ,„* au 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

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We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



HOCKEY WITH SPRINGFIELD 

(CoMinaMl from t*t* 1 1 



seasou Daitmouth by fast team work 
defeated Princeton 6 to 8, Wednes- 
day, and then Saturday lost to Har- 
vard in a contest which was said not 
to have brought out the best hockey 
of either team. The defensive work 
of Bnttrick and Ross, however, 
should assure a small score contest. 

The game announced us pending 
with M. I. T. for Tuesday, Jan. 30, 
in Amherst, has been definitely ar- 
ranged for that date. The Williams- 
town game with Williams college, 
originally scheduled for Saturday, 
Jan. 2 7, has been changed, at the 
request of the Williams management 
to Friday, Feb. 9, and will be the 
Prom game for that college, just as 
their return game in Amherst Feb. 
23 will be the M. A. C Prom game. 

Plans have now been completed 
for the "All New England Brown 
Dinner," which is to be held Tuesdav 
evening. .Jan. W, at the Copley- 
Plaza Hotel. The acceptances indi- 
cate that «00 men wiU attend. 
Among the speakers will be Charles 
Evans Hughes, who cornea to speak 
as a Brown graduate; President W. 
H. i\ Faunee, who will represent the 
university; and Judge Arthur L. 
Brown, class of I87fi, of the U.S. 
District Court. His Excellency 
Governor Samuel W. McCall is also 
on the program. 



The College Senate, 
Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association. 
Hockey Association, 
Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



MODERN REPAIR OCPT. 



L. T. Buckman, President — 410 
.1. A. Chapman, Manager— «3 14 
U. D. Hawley, Manager— 8314 
(). S. Flint/Manager— ."»4I-M 
||. R. Lawrence, Manager— ^"17 
N. Moorhouse, Manager— B364 
S. F. Tuthill, President — 116 
A. F. Williams, Manager— BS8 I 
D. M. Lipshires, Manager— 41 fi 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 83 17 
E. M. Burtiim. Manager— 8:u» I 
D. O. Merrill, President— » 10 
J. H. Duv, President— 837* 
L. T. Buckman, President— 410 
M J. McNamara. President— 580 
(). G. Pratt, Secretary— 834 < 



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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 23, 1917. 



VARSITY PUTS SCARE INTO c - *• c - F ""> s maroon five 
DARTMOUTH PUCK SHOOTERS T0 ° FAST AN aggregation 



Loses to Green Team Only After Hard 

Fought Battle. Score 2-0. 

Very Strong Defense. 

Playing a fast offensive game 
throughout, Dartmouth was able to 
defeat M. A. C. at hockey Saturday 
in Hanover by a 2 to score. Both 
scores resulted from clean shots by 
Paisley, the fast Green wing, after 
receiving clever passes from a team 
mate, one coming within 3 minutes of 
the start and the other about 10 min- 
utes afterwards. 

Dartmouth clearly out played M. 
A. C. in the first half, but in the 
second period play was more even, 
with much more agressivenees on the 
part of the losers. The sterling work 
of Captain Buttrick at goal together 
with brilliant breaking up of promis- 
ing Green attacks by "Bud" Boss 
kept the score down and drew fre- 
quent applause from the slim gather* 
ing who braved the extreme cold. 
Aggie's offensive play was unable to 
get going, but showed a decided im- 
provement as the game progressed. 

Aside from Paisley, Dartmouth's 
strongest player was Captain Tyler, 
who played a strong individual game. 
The passing of both teams was weak 
except the winners' work from behind 
their opponent's goal. 

In general the play of the M. A. C. 
seven was a decided improvement 
over the quality shown in the Spring- 
field game and augurs well for the 
Yale game Wednesday night and the 
remaining games of the season. 

The line np 1 

n.MlTMol ill M. \. i . 

Keycrnti, Birkfonl. Praetor, Iw 

rw. Neifey 

Viistiii, Mm |!i . c, SlUea 

Tyler (Capf.i. r r, Chiihulm 

faisley, rw Iw, Kicbarrifttn 

f'nirler. Austin, tp ep, L. Ron« 

IJ, Gale, p p, I ». BOBS 

I <»ale, J. Ho**, g a, Uuftrnk (f'apt.) 
Score— Dartmouth 'I. M V. V, 0, 
i»(»al« — Paisley I. Heferees — .1. W. 
Ihiwler and <». Ueran- TlnnT-\. A. 

\. Kublii. Time 20-minute halves. 



NEW ASSISTANT MANAGER 
Charles G. Mattoon, of Plttoneld, 
third in the competition for assistant 
track managers last year, has been 
elected to take the place of Richard 
Walt* of Middlefield, who is ineligi- 
ble. The other assistant manager is 
Walter Graves of Brookline. 



Varsity Rings In Basketball Season 
with 33-12 Victory. First Inter- 
collegiate Game Since 1900. 

Victory for the Maroon and White 
marked the reinstating of basketball 
as a varsity sport Saturday after- 
noon when Connecticut "Aggie" was 
set back by the score of 38-12 in a 
well-played contest. The game was 
watched by a big crowd of rooters 
who filled to its capacity the tem- 
porary bleachers erected in the Drill 
Hall. The Bay Staters were some- 
what bIow in getting a start and many 
of their first shots went wild. For 
the first few minutes the score stood 
in Connecticut's favor, but the clever 
passing of the home team soon put 
them ahead with a safe lead which 
the visitors could not overcome. 

Pond's pretty exhibitions of dodg- 
ing and passing made bis opponents 
look foolish at times. He worked 
well with McCarthy in the forward 
line, while Sedgwick played a strong 
game on the defense. Captain Gray- 
son was high scorer with three bas- 
kets and seven goals from free tries. 
For Connecticut, Norton and Dickin- 
son did good work. 

The line-up : — 

MAMACIItJUKTTH i <>\".NK< Tlrl-T 

McCarthy, HagelMein, 

Squires, If rh 
INhhI, rf 
K. Grayson, e 
F. Grayson, Gamer, Ih 
Sedgwick, l'arkbumt. 
Babbitt, rh If, MaklssMM, Hussar 
Score: MaHnarhti*i-n* H8, Connecti- 
cut IS, GoaU from the Moor- 'McCarthy 
3, .Sqniren. Pond 4, K. Grayson 1, ¥. 
Grayson, Nedtfwlek, Dickinaon, Shea, 
Norton, Goals from free tries — E. Gray- 
Bon 7, Diekinnon H, Norton •. Kefem 
Adpinall of Hpritijflleld. Timer ---f)erl»>. 
Scorer — Moorhouse. Ttnie— 80 minute 
halves. 

TO WAY ANNUAL VI8IT 
The committee on agriculture of 
the State Legislature will pay its an- 
nual visit to the college during the 
week of Jan. 22-27, to inspect these 
buildings and grounds snd try to get 
into closer touch with the present 
and the progressive needs of the col- 

leg«- 

ELECT 0LAJ8 CAPTAINS 
Donald Lent of Maynard has been 
elected captain of the freshman 
' basketball team. 

Nathan Gillette of Revere has been 
chosen to captain the 1918 class team. 



Ihirlow, Sesrs 

Ih, Traurig 

c, Norton 

rf. Shea 



ALUMNI HEARTILY INDORSE 
SCHEME FOR CLASS TALKS 



Enthusiastic Over Opportunity to Ben- 
efit Men Now in College. 
Alumni Forum the 9th, 

In all probability there will be 
between 25 and 30 alumni on the 
campus Alumni Day who will be back 
for the purpose of talkiug to under- 
graduate classes. This respouse of 
the alumni speaks of an interest in 
college affairs not always apparent to 
the younger men. It puts upon the 
undergraduates the necessity of re- 
sponding to the alumni in this effort 
they are making for the ttenefit of the 
men now in college. 

Alumni, old and young, are enthus- 
iastically voicing their opinions : 

■■Will be on hand Feb. :uh," writes 
Evan F. Richardson '87. "1 shall be 
glad to be of any assistance that 1 
can on Feb. 9th," says Joseph H. 
Putnam '94. 

Paul A. Davis '08 : »*Will say that 
yon can count on me, unless some 
unforeseen event should prevent," 

"I think the idea of alumni lect- 
ures an admirable one," chimes in 
Fred Nick less '10. 

"I certainly approve of the plan to 
bare alumni talk to the classes, and 1 
know such talks would have been 
very helpful to me and others when I 
was in college. I regard it as one of 
the best ideas developed at college 
for a long time," is the testimony of 
Josiah C. Folson MO. 

And George A. Post '1.1, the man 
who went back to Martinsville, N. J., 
and started in on the "ole fabtn" 
without letting the neighbors know he 
was a college graduate, and who now 
manages to bring in "about 100 a 
mo.", echoes the spirit of the occa- 
sion when he volunteers. 

•• Perhaps I can save others some of 
the mistakes I have made, and J 
know I'll be glad to hear what the 
other alumni have to say." 

Indeed, the plan ha* future possi- 
bilities if any alumni agree with 
Henry W. Walker *16 when he ven- 
tures to remark, **I really have one or 
two points in mind which should, I 
believe, be brought to the undergrad- 
uates' attention, but will wait until 
some fsr distant date before taking 
the stand on that account." 

The attention of the alumni U 
again called to the Alumni Forum. 
The meeting will be held Friday after- 
noon, Feb, 9th, at 3 p. m. In Stock- 

[Geatlasea on pa* • SJ 



No. 15 

BASKETBALL QUINTET TO 
MEET R. I. STATE SATURDAY 

In the Drill Hall at 8 P. M. Oppo- 
nents Have Lost to Amherst 
and Boston College. 

Rhode IhIuihI Stale will line up 
against the varsity basketball team 
in the Drill Halt, Saturday evening, 
in what promises to be one of the 
fastest games of the season. The 
Uhode Island quiutel has already 
played three games. She was hadls 
defeated by the sttong Amherst five 
in her first game, due to Home extent 
to lack of practice. The following 
week, however, the team came hack 
with a rush and defeated Northeant- 
ern college by s ll>Sfi score, LaHt 
week it took lloston university an 
overtime period to defeat Rh<»le 
Island 24-22. The team is coached 
by •■.Inn" Baldwin, the old Dart- 
mouth athlete. Malloy aud Spencer 
are probably the individual stnr* and 
will bear watching Saturday. 

Though the M. A. C line-up in 
uncertain, the Rhode Island quintet 
will probably be as follows : rg, \a ■ 
Boeuf ; Ig, Smith ; <-. Malloy or 6od« 
dartl ; rf, l^awrence, If, Spencei . 
The game will be called at 8 1*, m. 
Saturday in the Drill Hall. Cstl 
Reed of Micldletown will officiate. 

The freshmen have two basketball 
games scheduled for the week, both 
on the campus. On Wednesday st 
I 1*. m. they will meet the F<a«tbamp- 
ton quintst and on Saturday at 8 
r. m the strong Hstfleld high five. 



WASHINGTON CLUB MEETING 
The annual meeting and dance of 
the M. A. C. Club of Washington. 
I). C. will l>e held Friday evening. 
Feb. 2, at $-90 o'clock, at the Home 
Club, 14 Jackson Place. Washington. 
D. C. Visiting Alumni and Isdies 
are invited as usual. Those intend- 
ing to attend are requested to notify 
the acting secretary, II. L. Knight, 
1420 Buchanan St, Washington. 
D. C, 

TO GIVE CONCERT FOR ELK8 
A concert and dance will be given 
by the combined musical clubs of Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural Collegeat the 
annual ladies' night of the Elks 
Club of Northampton, on Thursday, 
Feb. 1. The clubs gsve a very suc- 
cessful concert a year ago at the 
Elks Lodge, when they had open 
sight. 














I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1917. 



GOOD SALEJOFJTICKETS 

Joint Concert With Tuft. Thursday 
Promise* to be Hit of Year. 
Practically every available seat 
has been sold for the combined 
Aggie and Tufts musical club con- 
cert, which is to be given at the 
Academy of Music, Northampton, 
Thursday Jan. 25. This new type 
of rivalry between the two colleges 
bids fair to unearth one of the best 
musical programs which may be heard 
in this vicinity this year. The pro- 
gram of the evening is as follows : 

i'\i;r iink. 
1. "Comrades in Arms," Adam 

M. A. <\ Glee Club. 

I, 'InvutuB," HrunoHuhn 

Tufts Glee Club, 

•'Ringolil." Sweeley 

M. A. 0. Mandolin Club. 

Beading, "fboottag of Dm m<- 

firue," Robert W. Service 

Mr. IUee, Tufts '18. 
"Defiance," Attenbofer 

M. A. C. Glee Club. 
"Princess Pat Selections," 

Victor Herbert 

Toftl Mandolin Club. 
Hawaiian Selections, Selected 

M. A. C. Sextet. 



t. 



G. 



8 



ii. 



10 



M 



12. 



13 



14 



I'AKT TWO. 

"The Jumbo Canteptic," 

K. \V. Newton '90 
Tufts <ilee Club. 
Popular Medley, Selected 

M. A. 0, Quartet. 
"Houte Maivhiir," Stock 

M A. C. Glee Club. 
"Some Little Bug," Burt 

Tufts Glee Club. 
"Sword Of Ferrera," liulkin! 

Mr. Worthley M. A. C. 
"PilRrltu ChoniB," Selected 

M. A. C. Mandolin Club. 

a. "Brown and Blue," E.W.Newton 

b. "Sons of Old Mass'chusetts," 

Kniul.t '02 
Combined Clubs of Tufts and M. A. C. 
The patrons and patronesses of 
the concert are : President and Mrs. 
Burton of Smith college, President 
and Mrs. Meiklejohn of Amherst 
college, President and Mrs. Butter- 
field of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college, Dean and Mrs. Olds of 
Amherst college, Dean and Mrs. 
Lewis of M. A. C. ; Dean Ada M. 
Comstock of Smith college, Mayor 
A. J. Morse of Northampton M. A. 
C. '96, Professor and Mra. Robbies, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Kenney and Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Fleet of M. A. C, 
Mrs. Billings and Mrs. Ferguson of 
Smith college, Dr. Cordorette and 
Dr. E E. Thomas of Northampton. 

COAST ARTILLERY MEET 



SPRINGFIELD EASY PREY 

IN INITIAL HOCKEY GAME 

In the first game of the season, 
with but two of last year's men back, 
the varsity hockey team defeated 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. college on 
the new rink last Wednesday, 9 to 1. 
Shinny playing characterized a large 
part of the game, and little team 
work on either side was noticeable. 
Three minutes after the opening 
whistle, L. Ross skated away from 
his opponents and scored the first 
goal. Even playing, with attempted 
shots by both teams, followed the 
first score until nearly the end of the 
first half when Richardson scored 
again for Aggie. Stiles added to the 
total by scoring just before the period 
ended. 

The second half was a veritable 
slaughter of the Springfield goal 
tender. The varsity showed better 
team work both in defensive and 
offensive playing and had little trouble 
in running up a large score. 

Captain Buttrick at goal Btopped 
many passes in his usual manner, 
and L. Ross, Stiles and Richardsou 
played fine hockey in their positions. 
Jenkins and Hobart, a former Am- 
herst high school star, showed up 
well for Springfield. 
The line-up : 



M> A- c. mnwnu) v. u. < . v. 

Uichardson. lw rw, Atkinson, Sampson 



Stiles, Hunnewell, c 
CbiBholm, r 
Seavey. Harwood, rw 
D. Boss, cp 
L. Ross, p 
Hut trick, h 

Score-M. A. C. 9, Sprin^lield Y. M. 
C. A. 1. Goals-Stiles 4, Richardson 2, 
Cbisholm 2, U Ross 1, Hobart 1. Ket- 
eree— W. Need ham. Tlroe-80 minute 
periods. 



c, Heraey 
p, Hobart 

lw, Jenkins 
cp, Hodge 

p, Jonannet 
it. Benatre 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 

FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

0orirtij Irano (Eln%a 

Free delivery to Amherst of 
any fur chase— large or small. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 



M. A. 0. Relay Team to Bun Rhode 
Island State. 

The first appearance of the relay 
team comes at the Coaal Artillery 
meet Boston, Saturday, Jan, 27, 
where they are pitted against the 
Rhode Island State team. The 
Rhode Island State squad has only 
one veteran back this year which is 
a similar situation to that of Aggie's 
team. The contest promises to be 
close fought to the finish. Men 
have been entered in the 75 yards 
and 220 yards dashes. 



AGRICULTURAL LEADERS 

TO VISIT THE COLLEGE 

That the college will hold a great 
deal of the attention of the agricul- 
tural world is indicated by the an- 
nouncement that at least six of 
the national bodies which comprise 
the leaders of agricultural teaching 
and science will make their head- 
quarters for their annual conventions 
at Springfield in connection with the 
Kastern states exposition and will 
hold several meetings at Amherst. 
The convention of the agricultural 
college and experiment station rep- 
resentatives will thua have intimate 
relation to the fiftieth anniversary cele- 
bration next fall, continuing from 
Oct. 8 to 12. The associations rep- 
resent 64 colleges and experiment 
stations and together with several 
allied organisations may be said to 
represent agricultural United Stales. 
The credit for bringing these conven- 
tions to Springfield and the college 
at such an auspicious time belongs 
to President Kenyon L. Butterfield 
and William D. Hard* director of the 
extension service. 



21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

(Miice Hours: 1-3,7-8 j». m. Sundav and 
other hour* by appointment. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 



Croysdole Inn 

SOUTH iIAHLKY. MASH. 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone w/m-W, Holyoke, 



54 S utt.. Ik St. 



Holyoke, Mass. 



Cox Sons & Vining 

71 Madison Ave,, New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
Hoods 

IE If' tk A for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLER6Y AND CHOIR 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 

Northampton 




'•Pete" Simmons and "Herb" 
Waikden '16 were on the campus this 
week. 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. MMtMbowtW 

KUtOPtAM FLAN 

The BMt Plies to Dine 
AO K I a d • • f S • a P 00 d 

Special luncheon from 11-80 to J p. m. 

——Ala carts w ri ca — 

6-30 a. m. to 11-30 a. m. 

R. J. RAHAR, Prop, 




FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florlcultursl Deal. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 
Telephone SOO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTEL 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Men's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Talle d'Hote Dinner, SI25 

GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1917. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

Odd Tear Men Win Their Games. 

Freshman Sophomore Contest a 

Thriller. 

Repitition of their first uuccess car- 
ried the seuiors near to the lead in 
the final race for the medals of the 
interclass basketball series. The 
juniors led them during the first but 
their lead was overcome in the second 
half. Mack was the individual star 
of the play for the seniors. 

The line-up : 
1917. tttl& 

Kelsey, rf ll», Gray 

Hariuw, If rb, Upuhires, Munition 

Ma.k.. v, Gillette 

Korstioin. rli If, Francis 

Day, lb rf, Minor 

Score -Seniors M, juniors 18. Ueieiw 
— Ashley. Goals from the floor Koltoy 
8, Uarlow, Mack 7, Francis 8, (JilleteL. 
Fouls— Mack 4, <iilleitt- 7. Time- 20- 
minute halves. 

1919 vs. 1920. 

Ths sophomore-freshman game 
was the thriller of the evening, being 
closely contested to the end. The 
first half ended with the score tied 
and the final whistle showed the 
sophomore team to be in the lead by 
one point. The final score was — 1919, 
15; 1920, 14. 

The line-up : 
nun. 1990. 

Vickers, If rb. Herman 

Hatchelder, rf lb, l.ittletield 

Blanchard, c c Armstrong 

Williams, lb rf. Graves 

Crowe, Wbiitle, rb If, Hall 

Scon- — Sophomores lo, tresbman 14. 
<;<>hI» from floor— Vickers, Uatchelder, 
Whittle 8, Ball 8, Graves, Armstrong. 
Fouls— Vickers 5, Ball ft. Referee — 
Ashley. Time-30-minute halves. 



GERRETT REAPPOINTED 
Frank Gerrett of Greenfield has 
been re-appointed a member of the 
Board of Trustees of this college. 

DR. GEO. A. HAS WELL 

Osteopath 



Central Chambers, Center Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

Phone io27*W 

AMHERST SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

The Best Shine la Town. 

-itm- 
Mlioe Wtpiilrlnu; 

V-.it 1* and M«i)ckb ilimi- 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Best 

Fhoto-Flay 

Features ... 

Are ■hewn, 

PROGRAM CHANGED DAILY 



CHOOSE DEBATING TEAMS 

The two varsity debating teams 
which will represent M. A. C in the 
intercollegiate debates have been 
chosen. Howard Russell '18, cap- 
tain, Theodore H. Keumann '18, 
Douglas T. Newbold '19, and Harvey 
'19, alternate will compose one team ; 
while Henry Burt '19, captain, Fred 
1$. Sampson *18, Sidney Stockwell 
'19, and Flavel Clifford "18, alternate, 
will make up the other team. 

The men are hard at work under 
Professors Patterson and Hand in 
preparation for the first debate which 
comes Feb. 16, with the University 
of Vermont at Burlington. Trinity 
College, Hartford, Conn., will be de- 
bated later in the season. Boston 
University* Union College, and 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. College may 
also be debated sometime during 
the winter. 



WIN CLOSE GAME 



Freshmen Defeat Hopkins Academy 
Five by 24-20 Score, 
lu a fast and close game, played 
Thursday afternoon in the Drill ball, 
the Freshman quintet proved them- 
selves the superior of the Bpeedy 
Hopkins academy basketball five. 
Lent and Harrington showed up well 
for the 1 920 aggregation and Majeski 
and Phillips for Hopkins played a 
clean, fast game. Majeski was a 
marvel at putting iu counters from 
the foul line, getting 8 out of 11 
tries. Score : 

HtKSIIMKN. IIOIKINh At AM MX. 

I);i\is. rf Is, Philip* 

l.othro|>. Ii rf, Majeski 

Harrington, Richards, i c, KMridge 

Lent, Yijjezzi, rli lit. Kokoskl 

Stediuan, lb rb, Cook 

Score — Freshman M, Hopkins acad- 
emy 90, Goals from floor- Davis *£, 
Lotlnop 2, Harrington B, Lent 2, 1'hiHpfl 
;{, Majeski H. Goals from fouls l^>th- 
rop ii, Majeski 8. Referee - Vickers '19. 
Time - 20 mimue halvi«, 



INCREASE PLEDGES 

Since the last figures were pub- 
lished the pledges of 1918 and 1919 
for Alumni Field have been increased 
so that the figures for these two 
classes are now as follows % 

1918. 1*.M9. 

Former pledge 1231. M $343.35 
Last M lO.on 167.60 

Total 261.25 :#02.95 

This increases the amount pledged 
to $1455,80 out of 11700.00 asked 
for, leaving 9244.20 yet unpledged 
of the amount needed to complete 
Alumni Field. Are we, or arc we 
not, going to turn Iff. Hicks down, 
and not complete the field ? Think 
about it! 

TO STAGE TWO PLAYS 
The Graduate club has begun re- 
hearsals on two one-act plays, "The 
Twelve Pound Cook** by Barrie, and 
"Food" a tragedy of the future by 
DeMille. These two playlets will 
form the major part of an entertain- 
ment to be given in Stock-bridge hall 
in the near future. 



Semi - Annual Clearance Sale 



$3 and $4 Derbys and Soft Hats, ..... Now $2 and $2.50 
Aquascutum Overcoats, Regular Price $28 to $35, Sale Price $20 to $25 

PATRICK MACKINAWS 

Regular Price $,o and #12, . . . NOW $7.50 and $8 

Sheep Lined Coats, Regular Price $\$ to $21, 

Sale Price $13.50 to $15.50 

—At— 

CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 

For 10 Days Only 



Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 



Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING A HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 



a vrari 



forty yean we hare rendered faithful servica. Far forty 

years we have fried hi make each ye«r*i service more neatly 

ideal. This untiring effort lias bah let ui not only The World * 

Large* Mail Oder Seed Busmen, but also a World WVi- 

repulation lor Efficiency and undisputed leadefshir.. The 

Fortieth Atiarveriary Edition of BttrpWs Annual, the 

"Leading American Seed Catalog" m brighter and 

barter than ever. Il is mailed free. A postcard will bring if. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Grower*, 

Burpee Buildlnga PWkrWpbia 



I*&LfC&*m JShoe Store 

Largest Stock— Lowest Prices 
Expert RepalHnB-B««t leather uaed 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IIf« 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



.'• 






1 




Thr y^hu^tts Collegian, Tucaday^an^, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIA^ 

"^ubliiheTTrery Tuesday e»eniiiK 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH 11 Editor tn-ChUf 

MARSHAIXO. LAM HEAR 'W. M *lM ■*** 



ABROl'IATK ETIITOKB. 

.iohn t. umai '" 

J09KIM1 F. WHITNEY 17 
FRANK .1. MSKB'IH 

NATHAN W. (illXElTE *18 

EI.IOT M. BUKFim 1» 

MYRTON F. EVANS *19 



7-00 i- 



8-16 P. 



4-:«» p. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MEURIIX P- WARNER MT. Bu.ine.. Manager 

iiurar POWEI.I. '!«. 

JAMKB t. ru 1|iW ,,i Kualnew M.nWtr 

■nui'RK R ROSKQI'IST '18. 

BIR«*ER R. Kun w AdTerUilng Manager 

Subscription »2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
bribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered a. second-HaM matter atthe A inherit 
Post Office. 

Tol. XXVII. Toeiiay, J**!*** **' 1S 



The Collegian takes this oppor- 
lunity to extend a welcome to the 
members of the legislative committee 
on agriculture who are now visiting 
the college. It would be useless 
here to point out all the improve- 
ments which are needed in the shape 
of new buildings and equipment, and. 
:l bove all, dormitories. These needs 
•ire written in letters so large that he 
who runs may read. We hope and 
trust that the visitors may take back 
to the State House such impressions 
of M. A. C. as will insure the pas 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

motto for tbi. column should b. ** **** 
at the OotxKOtA* office or ^J******^ 
W . Gillette '18 on or before the Mono., pre- 
ceding each lMue.1 

Wednesday, Jan. 24 
2-10 i». M.-Mr Joe Mitchell Chappie, 
Sioekbridge Hall. 
m. -Mandolin Club Rehearsal 

Social Uuion. 
7 . (K)p M __ Agricultural Economics 

Club meeting. 
M— 'Varsity Hockey, M. A. C. 
vs. Vale, Yale Arena. 
TiiiiKBDAY, Jan. IB 
M . —Special Assembly for State 
Legislative Committee on Ag- 
riculture, Stockbridge Hall. 
M . -Florist's and Gardener's 

Club, French Hall. 
M.-Musical Clubs Concert, 
Tufts and M. A. C. Academy 
of Music, Northampton. 
Fisiday, Jan. 26 
700 ,. M ._interclass Basketball, Drill 
Hall. 

Saturday, Jan. "27 
•2-30 P. m.- Freshman Hockey, l'itts- 
tield High School vs. M. A.C. 
1920, Alumni Field. 
8-00 p M -'Varsity Basketball, It. I. 
State vs. M. A. C. Drill Hall. 
Sunday, Jan. M 
.,-10 k. M.-Chapel. Uev. Philip 8. 
Schenck, Pastor Plymouth 
Church, Framingham. 
6-30 P, M.— Y. M. C. A Meeting. Social 
Union. Mr. Arao Itano. 



7-00 i- 



H-00 P. 



COMMUNICATION 

TO THE EDITOR OK THE CoLLEOIAN : 

While the editorial columns of the 
Collegian are ringing with the cry 
for a real Aggie democracy,— a more 
broadminded and far-seeing policy 
of dealing between fraternity and 
non-frateruity men, may I ask that 
you print the following, that was 
recently published in the Boston 

n*e of an adequate appropriation \Tranncrtpt. 

bill at this session of the legislature.) I realize that the question ,at_ M 



lege life than another? Ib it undem- 
ocratic for brain, to count and en- 
ergy to be rewarded ? la there lack 
of "democracy when a man who is 
continually trying to give as much as 
he can of himself to his college re- 
refuses his respect to the man who 
ia continually trying to get as much 
as he can out of the college? Of 
what, in short, does democracy con- 
sist? The Quadrangler believes 
that a college body is democratic 
when it offers an equal opportunity 
to every man, when it bestows its re- 
wards onlv on those who merit them 
and when pre-eminent fitness is the 
prerequisite for a place on any team 
or an office of any sort. Cliques, 
election deals, etc., have no place in 
the general scheme, but the fact that 
certain men have chosen to band 
themselves into a club for social 
purposes is no indication of a lack of 
democracy. In -very college there 
are men-many of them— who de- 
serve to be alighted and Bhunned. 
Every move they make and every 
hand they turn is for a selfish pur- 
pose. To them the college as such 
means nothing. They are in college 
solelv for what they can get out of it, 
and a avstem which deprives them of 
every possible advantage is not un- 
democratic. By their actions they 
count the contempt of their fellowB 
and theyahould get it. No: it is 
not yet time to abolish the Princeton 
clubs or the Yale societies. They 
serve many a useful purpose, not the 
least of which ia that they give a lot 
of well-meaning persons something 
to talk about." a>w _ Sm , 17 . 



E.B. DI0KINSON,D.D.S. 



DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hour. 9 to a. m.. 1-80 to 6 p. m. 



THE BIG FOUR 

Black and White Cigars, 5c 

Black and White Little Cigars, 15c 

Black and White Tweenies. 10c 

Black and White Cigarettes, 10c 

If you have not tried them 
you have missed something. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store 



01 LAVAL 

Separators 

Save in Seven Ways 

QUANTITY of cream that no other sepa- 
rator will recover completely. 

QUALITY of cream as evidenced lu l>e 
Laval batter always scoring highest in 
every Important contest. 

I ABOR In'every way over any gravity sys- 
tem or other separator, by turning 
easier, being eaaler to clean and re- 
quiring no adjustm«nt. 
T1MK over any gravity system or other sep- 
arator, by reason of greater capacity 
and the same reasons that save labor. 



In the Springfield Republican of 
.Ian. 19, prominent space on the 
sporting page was given to an article 
which said that M. A.C has found 
graduate football coaching a failure 
and was bidding for the services of 
"Tom" Cotton of Dartmouth as heap 
coach. Tl>«a statement has, of 
courae, no foundation in fact, for no 
one considers last season a failure 
by any means and furthermore, no 
action" whatever has been taken by 
the athletic committee in regard to 
this vear'a coaching. Mr. Cotton 
himself denies that he had any knowl- 
edge of the rumor which prompted 
the Re t ,»t>l »■«»'» » rt " ,,e - H evidently 
originated in the imagination of 
some correspondent in Hanover whose 
hvnger for news exceeded his judg- 
ment. Such an article does rank 
injustice to the Aggie coaches who 
worked so hard last fall and turned 
out a creditable team in the face of a 
8t iff schedule. It is depressing, to 
„ay the least, that what little news- 
paper publicity the college geta is 
often twisted in such a manner as to 
do more harm than good. 



Kx jiy,_john Smallwood 
the camptw recently. 



visited 



A. C. is not the breaking down of 
the fraternity system, neither, I 
hope, is it the fallacious idea that 
"if a fraternity is good foroue, why 
is it not good for all,"— yet ! feel 
that this extract is pertinent, never- 
theless : 

"The Quadrangler has heard much 
about the Princeton clubs, both from 
prejudiced and unprejudiced observ- 
ers. He cannot see wherein they 
differ a great deal from the aocieties 
at Yale or Harvard or from the fra- 
ternities at Brown, Tufta or Wil- 
liams. And what is more, he does 
not like this glib use of the word 
"undemocratic." He is not sure, 
indeed, that he knows just what col- 
lege democracy means. He thinks a 
clear definition of the term, a defin- 
tion that would be intelligible to all 
minds, would do a whole lot toward 
making a rational discussion poaaible. 
4 'Is it undemocratic for a man to 
choose as his closest frienda men 
who are congenial to him, or shouldn't 
be have any cloaeat friends at all? 
Ia it undemocratic for a man or 
group of men to cultivate the ac- 
quaintance of other men who are 
prominent in college lif«» or shouldn't 
one man be more prominent in col- 



FRAT. RELAY RESULTS 

The interfraternity racea have 
rounded the third marker in their 
progress with the results bringing 
out a slower time in the last series, 
due to the high wind prevailing. In 
the first set of contests the results 
brought victory to Phi Sigma Kappa 
over Q. T. V. ; to Kappa Sigma 
over Beta Kappa Phi; Kappa 
Gamma Phi forfeited the race to 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. The second 
group of racea gave victory to the 
following: Kappa Sigma over Q.T. 
V. ; Lambda Chi Alpha over Alpha 
Sigma Phi; Phi Sigma Kappa over 
Theta Chi. The Monday contests 
added to the laurela of the following 
teams :Lambda Chi Alpha over Theta 
Chi; Alpha Sigma Phi over Beta 
Kappa Phi ; Phi Sigma Kappa over 
Kappa Gamma Phi. 

The following men have been 
elected by their respective fratern- 
ities to manage the inter-fraternity 

relays : 

Q, T. V M F. Bainbridge '18 
# S K, L. M. VanAlstyne '18 
KS, E. H. Skinner '19 
AX A, G. H. Schlough'18 
A % ♦, B. R. Rosequist '18 
B K ♦, I. W. Ingalla '18 
®X, E. Ritter'18 
S#E, C. F. Mattoon '19 
K r#, J. E. Callanan '19 



( OST In that the l>e Laval will butt from ten 
to twenty years, while other separators 
wear out and require to be replaced In 
from one to five years 
PROFIT in more and better cream, with less 
labor and effort every time milk Is put 
through the machine. 
SATISFACTION which can only come from 
knowing yonthave the best separator, 
and are at all times accomplishing the 
best possible results. 



THE OE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



lfi6B«<>AT»WAV 

NKW YOKK 



29 K. Madison Ht. 
CHICAflO 



What Does 

Silage Cost? 

The acres used and culti- 
vated time and again, and 
the area to be gone over to 
get the fodder are the big 
items in Silage cost 

Nitrate of Soda, as a Top 
Dressing worked in when 
cultivating, will cheapen 
production of your Silage, 

Bigger, more succulent 
stalks and bigger ears wUl 
be yours. 

Send post card for free book •* 

"Corn Cultivation" 

DR. WILLIAM S. MYERS 

25 Madison Avenue, New York 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1917. 



DEERFIELD FALLS TO 1920 

The freshman basketball team, 
although outweighed and playing 
against a veteran team, defeated 
the fast quintet from Deerfield 
academy, Saturday. The defense of 
the freshmen was like a stone wall, 
while Richards and Harrington per- 
formed well on the offense. : 

The line-up : 
M. A. <*. 1020 Dkkiimkui A<\i»K.\n 

Lothrop, u ib, Graham 

(Ball,) Harrington, tt U>, Callahan 

Richards, c e, Winn, (Davis) 

I-enl, lb rf. Tmiiey 

Fifeazl, rb it, Wright, f'lapp 

Score — Fresh in an Iri, Deerfield Acail- 
eruy 15. Uoalw from Moor — Lothrop, 
Harrington 2, Richard* 8, Tumey I, 
Wright, Clasp. PcroU — Lothrop 4, 

Tumey 7. Ueferee - Swafliehl of Brown. 



DENNIS MACCARTHY, POET, 

TO SPEAK AT ASSEMBLY 

Dennis Aloysous MucCarthy, poet, 
editor and lecturer will address the 
student hotly at Assembly, Wednes- 
day, Jan. 31. Mr. MacC'arthy is a 
native of Ireland, being born in Car- 
rick-on-Suir, of Tipperary County. 
Since 1901 he has been associate 
editor of the San'erl Heart Review, 
Boston. He is a well-known lect- 
urer on literal v, patriotic and social 
topics. As the author of "A Round 
of Rimes" and "Voices from Erin" 
his fame is established. He is a 
member of the Massachusetts Pil- 
grim Tercentenary Celebration Com- 
mittee. 



FRESHMEN DEFEAT DRURY 

The Freshmen won an 8 hockey 
victory over the Drury high school 
septet on Alumni field rink Saturday 
afternoon. The North Adams boys 
were clearly outclassed from the 
start and their defense was weak. 
The Freshman played a clever pass- 
ing game featured by the good stick 
work of Hall and Crafts, while Vad- 
ium and Kuvard allowed tip well for 
Drury. The line-up : 

I -IIKMIMI .\. D|;l |;\ 1 1 1 < . n sillnnl.. 

Doucette, g K) Mokaxds 

Douglas*, i> |,, porter 

Mailon, cp up, Hlattman, [Juaglaa 

OaftN, r ,-, Vailiiais 

Ball, c c, Uletidonning 

Spenser, Sauderton, i« u, Euvard 

Bedding, In r«, ftsy, Gale 

Soon -Fresh men H, Drury llitih 0. 
Goals Ball 1, (rails :{, Bedding. Hi I 
erec Kcnialil of M. A. C. Time 16 
minute halves. 



RIFLE TEAM TO SHOOT 

FIRST MATCH THIS WEEK 

The rifle team is shooting the first 
match of the season this week under 
somewhat different conditions from 
previous years. The targets are dif- 
ferent in form, the bullseye being 
about one half the size of the former 
ones. The entire bull to be shot at is 
now about two instead of three inches, 
and the inner bull is about one quar- 
ter instead of one half inch in diame- 
ter. The targets are to be shot. 10 
shots offhand then ten shots prone. 
Although the match is due to be shot 
in time to get the targets to Wash- 
ington by Thursday, the team does 
not know who their opponents are. 
Ill*- team at present is as follows i 
(apt. Canlett, Parsons, Barton, 
Kiellick, Davies, Sweeney, Taylor. 
I'hipps, A. Loring, W. Mack. 

A new plan proposed by Capt. Can- 
lett is to change the lowest three men 
ou the team for every match, thus 
,'iving opportunity for the twenty men 
Ml the squad to try out. 



TO ISSUE NEW BULLETIN 

National Farm Loan Associa- 
tions," Extension Bulletin 18, by Dr. 
Alexander E. Cance and Ralph M. 
Itntledgeof the department of eco- 
in'inics, will be distributed Friday, 
•In. -26. It treaU of the Federal 
Fare Ivoan Bill, of bow it affects 
Mnisachuselts farmers, how farm 
loans are made, and of how farm 
l'»«»i associations are formed. 



TO RUN AGRICULTURAL FILMS 

The Department of KconoinicH is 
going to run a series of films on the 
cattle, sheep, cotton, whent, and 
Sugar industries of the world and 
another, if possible, to finish out the 
Irrigation films, of which 1000 feet 
were shown Saturday afternoon, Jan. 
20, out of 4000 feet expected. The 
dates these are to be shown are as 
follows : 

Jan. 2(1. Cotton growing and 
manufacturing — 2000 feet. 

Feb. 2. Sheep Industry, OflteUI 
films of both the Canadian rind Aus- 
tralian governments, showing how 
sheep are raised in the countries. 
1000 feet each. 

Feb. 9. Wheat harvesting scenes 
displayed on the famotm fertile fields 
of the Canadian prniricH. 

Feb. 23. Cattle. Ollieial lilmsof 
both the Canadian and Australian 
governments, showing how cattle are 
pantured ami the frozen meat in- 
dustry. 

March 2. Sugar, Showing how 
beet sugar is produced from tin* grow- 
ing of the seed to the liuitdied product. 

DEPUTATION WORK 

A te9in of deputation workers 
under the leadership of Theodore 
Reumaun '1* of New Bedford, con- 
ducted several meetings for young 
men interested in Y. M. ( . A. work 
in South Deerfield on Saturday and 
Sunday of last week. The following 
V. M.C. A. men from Aggie were 
present: Lincoln I). Kelsey '17 of 
West Hartford, Conn. : I'aul W. 
Latham '17 <>f N'orwichlown. Conn. ; 
John T. Dizer "17 of Fast Weymouth 
and Raymond T. Park hurst 'I'.t of 
Fitchburg. Harry White 'Ifi and 
Lewis Spanldiiifj "I* were hIbo pres- 
ent at a special meeting Saturday 
evening 

TO PLAY LOOMIS 

Another hockey game has been 
added to the freshman schedule for 
.Ian. .il with Loomis Institute of 
Windsor, Conn. The 1920 hockey 
team plays Fittsfield High Saturday 
at 2-30 i\ M. 



TOWN HALL 

New Management New Equipment 

Program ChangSt Monday, Wednesday 
sad Friday. 

Present inn K\ery 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

1 'am mount Productions 
Billy Burke In "Gloria's Romance " 

20 episodes ul 2 reels eaeli, 

Hlaek Diamond Comedies. 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Triangle Features, with Keystone 8-roel 

Comedies, ami HaTamonut 

Plctogtrapfa. 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Paramount Pnnlmt inns, Uiiriun Holmes' 

Travel Series, Hray Comedy Cartoon, 

and Pat he News Weekly. 



K\ m i \ i it'iiMMiii. ul :i o'clock, entire beats ISe 

elillilri'ii ."><•. 

Kveu Evening. M " n'etoek. entire floor ir.c 

b i leom Mc< 

tu>\ nfliie o|ietiB at tf-,10 and lei o'l-lmk. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOHI.AR MVIIAT MKRYICK AT 7 P. St. 

WHITES MUSIC STORE 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Keai'li. Lincoln unil Kingston sis , 
BOSTON, r\ASS. 



Onlj two IiIim-Kh from South Terminal su 
lion, and eimiiy reached from North autlnn 
b> Klevati'd Uaiiwiiy.anil convenient alike 
totheitrcat retaWabopi and btwlneu centre. 
also to the thcatiFH ami place* of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 par Day 
and Upwards 

Tahiti iinl nrt leg unmi rimmed. 
Booklet and man aent iiixin application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 



HKNUV K. 

Jit M m\ Si ill Kl . 



WIIITK 
KMTBAMI i« 



Mandoline. Pennine Hawaiian intntaltt. rkila. 
atring*. ace., and Bnato (Brail towrawa ante. and 

all eofeee. Iimtrunient* may he had on trial. 



HOW IS THE SOLE WITH YOU ? 

• ■ft yum nliiifh i.i|i|iiiI ,ii 

GINSBURG'S, Amity St. 

\>>>tk neatly done f^atinfai tion guaranteed 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 
Gents' Furnishings 

Full Dress Suits to Rent 

( .i|is and Clowns lor Sale or Rent 

Also Ladies' Tailoring 

Our \Vf»ik ia Guaranteed 

We do I •ycinir, ('leaning. Keimlrlim and Pimalng 
ril«»NK hto-W 

1 1 AMITY STREET, AMHERST, MASS. 



The wise ones read 
our advertisements 
It pays. 

Every young man 111 
this country today is 
ambitious- or he'a a 
"dead am 



Our specialty is 

Clothes for Young Men 

that have pep. 

MEMIITT CLARK t CO., %JS2£2! 

WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

Electric Grill Stoves 

y to care for and rrn ilan^er of fire 
Also a good line of 

STUDENT LAMPS AND APPLIANCES 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

MPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Founteln Pens 

Asente for Me* T»|i#wrlter 
F. M. CURRAN, C. F. DYFR 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

— K. D. MAK8II KHTATK - 




► »•.■■■•««.■ 

STICIMIKN I.VM-. FOLUFK. lie. 
MArviTratrrnftiNf* jrwmi.kr.s 

IH«> IIMOADWAY, NKW VOKK 

OEAn AMi nii.|,i-.(,| 
PINS AND MlM.s «« 

«»•»!. i>, Mir.vnit *nii MMnxr.n mmiiai.m 

JOIN THE BUNCH IT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

New located over pott office. Up one flight 

Pwslng ui Clunlnr a Specialty 

liberal Ticket Syitem T»L Jfr-M 

College Stationery 

With Clan* Numerals. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer sad Stationer 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



Gallup at Holyoke 



193-^07 High HI, 



SELLS- 



Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and M* ottr 
blf More 






I 












The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1917. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

13 Pleasant St. 
OculUt.' Prescription. Filled. Broker lUMJ 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and Skilfully ^one 

Satisfaction Guaranteea 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0. 

tWTKOl'ATHH l'HYSM IAN 

305 LAMBIE BLOB., N0RTHAMPT0M, MASS. 

Telephone 



ltl N VOl'll 



Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

etc.. of 

A. W. HAsUW. AMHERST. MASS. 

I eall at the norms and Kraternltj Hon*.-*. 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



Jobber* of Wrought Iron and Br ass^ Pipe. Valves 
Ind Fittings for "team, Water and G.v Ashes os 
and Macnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. Pipe 
('ut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 

BANQUETS PARTY DHEn|ggtt«sEBSBg 



American ami Kurupemi lMann 



«« 



■>■> 



BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffle* 

Our Specialty -And other good things to eat 

MRS. L. M. STEBBIN5, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4«S-W 

The Highland Hotel 

..I,., rlin „ n .he Kuropean Plan. It is |usi .j «ey 
Main st eet. a*!>v from the no.se and dust 
and veun the center of the business dtstnet. 

U, room, are well furnished and cm">° r '» b j"' 
havina » telephone and hot and cold running 
naming * ,,!re f i»,i». at and up; rooms 

water in every room. Prices »» ana hf. «««• 
with bath (single! •!-»" and up. 

Itseacellent cuisine anl -el! ventilated dining 

«erv*i in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Motel pnce and yo^HU 
anticipate Maying there again. M"** *"»* 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HIchlMd Hetel. 



HECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



•* HAiwir»** 



Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the time to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletins. 

Johnson Book Go. 

Babbitt Woodworth 

Alpha S'mnia IMii House. 



BASKETBALL OF YORE NOT 
LIKE PRESENT AGGIE BRAND 

Teanis of »02-'09 Played Mostly 
Local Quintets. Varsity Games 

a Failure. 
At this time of intercollegiate 
basketball resurrection it perhaps 
would be of iuterest to review the old 
basketball days at the college. The 
first varsity to represent M. A. C 
was 1902 with a schedule of eight 
gameB of which only four were with 
colleges. The team drifted along 
for several years with practically no 
student support and coach, always 
playing against odds. Half of tbe 
games were played with local Y. M. 
C. A. and semi-professional teams of 
the valley which were largely victories 
and the remainder with some of the 
best New England colleges among 
which were Amherst, Springfield, 
Ikown, Dartmouth, Holy Cross, 
Tufts and Williams practically all of 
which, through lack of coaching, 
were decisive defeats. In the win- 
studeut body, after 



CROWS SELECT CAMPUS 

TO BE THEIR ROOKERY 

Crows :— 1500 of them ; with their 
caws and clatter | settle down each 
night in the heavy ash and pines on 
the ridge back of "PrexyV house 
and until early morning hold sway in 
the corner of the campus, much to 
the annoyance of the nearby resi- 
dents. But aside from complimeut- 
ing the birds on their intelligence in 
picking out this campus as their 
camping grounds there are several 
points of interest in the event. 
While large colonies of crows are 
common further south this is the first 
record of any colony wintering over 
in this county for a long time. Fur- 
thermore, setting a conservative esti- 
mate at 1500, this is half as large 
again as the nearest record neighbor 
colony which is, or has been, located 
for the paBt few weeks in Hampden 
county. At present the birds can do 
little put pick a living from the fields 
of the Connecticut Valley and make 
the night noisy with their clatter. 
Much comment, however, is now 



ter of 1908 the siuucui ,«*■...., -.»»• mum wowm*, —..-.-- , 

the team had experienced an extended p a88 ir.g the ronndB as to what will 

and disastrous northern trip, ex- happen if these guests remain for the 



i)|trlncflel<l, *l»ee. 



pressed the sentiment that the sched- 
ule be canceled, but spirit enough per- 
sisted to carry the season through. 
The next year the athletic committee, 
disgusted with the support, dropped 
basketball from the major sport list 
and it is at this point that the 1917 
team continues the work. 



spring corn planting. 



AMHERST GARAGE CO., mc. 

Automobile »m>i>ile>»» 



mmr*t*tN<* '" ***■ ' rs «""" c "* s 



VULCANIZING 



• ** 



gamin m m 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS *Nl> POULTRY ORESSIHS 

WI|i>I.K>M,K ONLY 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb. Veal. Pork. Hams, Bacon, Sail 
safes, Poultry, (lame. Butter, Cheese, 
Eggs, Olive Oils. 



GRANTED LEAVE OF ABSENCE 
Professor Foord, bead of the divis- 
ion of agriculture at the Massachu- 
chusetts Agiicultural college, has 
been granted a leave of absence of 
oue year. It is Professor Foord.' 
plan to take up advanced study in 
farm management during the year, 
and with this end in view he will 
studv at Cornell university and pos- 
sibly at the University of Wisconsin. 
The supervision of the work under 
the division of agriculture will I* 
undertaken by Professor Lock wood, 
while the management of the farm 
will fall to the head of the animal 



ADDRESS FARM BUREAU 

At the annual meeting of the Berk- 
shire farm bureau at Pittsfleld last 
Saturday the following faculty gave 
addresses : President Butterfield 
talked on "What is Agriculture?" 
taking up the matter of faim work 
and advocatiug the purchase of 
better livestock; Prof. Sumner R. 
Parker of the extension rural organi- 
zation staff gave his addresB on the 
subject, "Farm Bureau Work in 
Massachusetts for the Year 1916 ;" 
and Miss Laura Comstock, superin- 
tendent of the home economics ex- 
tension course, whose subject was 
"Massachusetts Agricultural College 

I- x tension Service." 



DR. ITAMO TO SPEAK 
Arao Itano, Ph. D. of the depart- 
ment of microbiology will be the 



BlMkwWMi North ami North < cntre Stream. 
BOSTON, • HASS. 



will fall to the head of the animal ^ , t the y, M . C. A. meeting 

husbandry department, Professor ^ ^ ^.^ Un|on room Btxt §„„. 



McNutt. 



F. A SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 

Shoes Hats Furnishings 

Local Agent *»■" M ^ BRO WNINa, KINO ft CO., 

H. V. PKivn a*, custom Tailors 

OUR DISCOUNT TICKKT SAVKS YOU 5% 



BALBSMAH TG SPEAK 
O. E. Duling of Yale university 
will give a lecture on "Salesman- 

.hip- Th-ttita, •~«taj ; ■** ° ,cl «* 1 8imdmy eveoing . 

in the entomology building. Hi-i 
principal emphasis will be on the 
value of applying the fundamentals 
of good salesmanship to agriculture 
a* well as to other field, of activity. 
Mr. Duling is well fitted to ileal with 
the subject because of hi. broad expe- 
rience as a salesman. 



in the Social Union room next Sun- 
day evening at 6-45. The subject 
for discussion as suggested by Dr. 
Itano i» "Nippon" and should be of 
interest to every student. Special 
attention is called to the time Mfi 



Carp*n*er & Morchoust, 



FLORISTS' CLUB MEETING 
Thursday evening, Jan. 25, at 
7-00 p. «., Mr. Aubrey Butler of 
the firm of Butler and UUman of 
Northampton will addreaa a meeting 
of the Florists* and Gardeners* CS-- 
on "Retail Store Management in 
Floricultural Work." 



PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 



PLAY YALE TOMORROW 

The varsity hockey septet leaves ^ y ^.^ ^^ 

tomorrow, Wednesday noon for New ^ ^ ^ |§ 

Haven to meet Yale 10 the *«" representing the company in 

Haven Arena at 8-» i *tf -mug. | ^XT^ted thec.mpu.LnUy. 
The next game will be Tuesday, * ^ ^ ^^ 

Jan. SO, .t 4 p. «■ on Alnmn, Field fc 

rink. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1917. 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Under the direction of the rural 
engineering department the stu- 
dents are installing a set of forges 
to be used in the courses in forge 
work and repairing farm machinery. 
The frame-work and casing for the 
forges is largely being done by stu- 
dents in rural engineering 26, as well 
as the installation of the blower, 
which is to be driven by a small 
gasoline engine. 

1913 NOTES 

Thomas P. Dooley, teacher, 
Brighton, Mass. "Tom" writes that 
there are a number of students who 
are seriously thinking of going to 
M. A. C. at Brighton high school 
and he is doing some real Aggie 
boosting. 

Lawrence A. Bevan is the proud 
father of a son, John Robert Bevan, 
Address, Walpole, Mass. 

C. Herbert Brewer, agricultural 
department, the Barret Co., 17 Bat- 
tery place, New York City. 

Stuart Moir visited college last 
week. Stuart gets through at Yale 
Forestry in March and expects to go 
South for a couple of mouths 
lumbering. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

'97. — John M. Barry is sales man- 
ager of the En Fonola Phonograph 
Company of Boston. His present 
address is 218 Tremont St., Room 
603, Boston. 

'09. — A son, Clement Russet, was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Harold D. 
Phelps on Aug. 31, 1916. 

' 1 2 —The family of the late A. 
F. Muller have presented to the de- 
partment of landscape gardening a 
set of the lantern slides collected by 
Mt. Muller in hi. work along civic 
improvement lines. 

•M. — Mrs. Hugh L. Stalker of 
East Boston announce, the marriage 
of her daughter, Helen G. Stalker 
to Raymond P. Walker '14. 

'14, — Miller Jordan in a letter 
dated Dec. 14, write, that thing, are 
again tranquil in Sinaloa and that 
most of the American. have returned. 
He and hi. classmate, "Casey" 
Jones, and a few more remained at 
lx>s Mochis daring the intervention 
scare. Jordan will be back for Com- 
mencement. He say. be will then 
have some most remarkable lie. to 
tell of these strenuous d.ys in Mex- 
ico and a fine set of photograph, to 
back them up. 

'1 . , ». — Carl Fry. ha. accepted a 
position with L. Brandt, landscape 
architect in Cleveland, 0. He is 
married and living at 1535 E. 1 lKth 
street. 



Chancellor Elmer Ellsworth Brown 
of New York University has an* 
nounced that Jacob Schiff ha. given 
150,000 to the university to begin the 
permanent endowment of the division 
of pu hi ic affair, in the school of com- 
merce, accounts and finance. 



NEW BOOKS IN LIBRARY 

Recent library accessions number 
over 40 books, dealing with subjects 
of varied forms, economics, forestry, 
agriculture, science, all the major 
work of the college. Following is 
given a list of the new acquisitions 
and their catalogue number on the 
shelf. The date of publication is 
1916 unless otherwise specified. 

The American college. 1915. 328 Am4 
Atlantic monthly, Atlantic classics 

H'll At6 
Brings, L. R. College life. 19<M. 37H 

B70 
Carver, T. N. Selected readings in rural 

economies. 610.88 <"2.">s 
Coester, A. L. The literary history of 

Spanish America. M00 COS 
Diftioth, Paul. /ootechnie g<?ii£ralc 

1915. 080.13 1)66 
Kaufman, C. A. From the deep woods 

to civilization. 1)21 Ea7 
Gamhle, .1. 8. Flora of tbe presidency 

Of Madras. 1915. 5*0.95 G14 
Greene, A. M. The elements of relri it- 
eration. 021. & G8H 
Harding, L. A. Mechanical equipment 

of buildings. 090 1121 
Kilboiirne. C. 11. The pasteurization of 

milk. 031.1 K55 
ICober. G. M. Diseases of occupation 

and vocational hygiene. 01. p i,H2 K79 

Maedonald, J. K. New Zealand sheep 
farming. 1915. 636.3 M14 

Moon, F. F. The hook of forestry. 688 

M77b 

National academy of sciences. Proceed- 
ings, v. 1, 1015. 506 N'ilp 

New York milk committee. Mediation 
of infant mortality. 11*12. 618.881 
N4*t 

Nourse. E. G, Agricultural economies, 
680.38 NH& 

I *lu miner. M. W. The seven jovs of 
reading. 1915. 0%) p78s 

Itugg, H O. The experimental deter- 
mination of mental discipline. 
370.25 1184 

Sbults. G. C. Agricultural arithmetic 
080.51 Sb'.t 

Weather, John. The bulb book 1911. 
034.53 W37 

Wells, II. G. Social forces in Kngland 
and America. 1914. 30* W40 

tsKociatioii of official a^riculi oral chem- 
ists. Journal, 1, 1015. 547.03 A s7j 

liatitain, L. K. M. The art of extem- 
pore speaking. NM WU 

liuinap. G. Parks, theii 'design, equip- 
ment and use. 718 l<93 

Clements, F K. Plant succession. 
.X0.8C59 

Cubberley. K. P. State and county 

school Administration. 1915. 379 

C89 
Dryden, James. Poultry breeding and 

management. »I30.6 1)84 
Frost, Robert. Mountain interval. 821 

F93m 
Gardner, F. 1). Success! u I farming. 

080 018 
Groat. G. G. An Introduction to Hie 

study of organized labor. 831.88 G89 
Hollingworih. A. L, Vocational psy- 
chology. 012.821 1172 
King.C. L. Lower living costs in cities. 

1915. 888.5 K5rt 
bahee. F. H. Field geology. eH 1.23 
Mansfield, W. Histology of medicinal 

plants. 680.4 M78 
Moore, II. E* Economic cycles. 1914 

080,88 M79 
National institute of social sciences. 

Jonrnal. v.!-*, 1915-10. 306 V22 
Nonhead. M II. Garden ornaments. 

- j, \H I 

Paine, A. H. The boy's life of Mark 
Twain, 921 TOlpb 

Iloehl, U. M. Agricultural woodwork- 
ing. 084 W62 

Urott, E. J. Booker T. Washington, 
Builder of a civilisation. 921 U 80s 

Warn*, J. The tide of Immigration, 
325 W24t 

Weed, C. M. Introduction to agricul- 
ture 630.07 W41 



SHEEP SKIN GOATS AND ULSTERS 

at the lowest prices in the state. Incidentally we have the best 
assortment that you have seen. 






Custom Made Reversible Collared Shirts 



From $1.25 to $4.00 



Some real values. 



Freshmen Toques, 60 Cents 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Schaffner St Marx Clothes 



School and College photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mom 



Main OKrica: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



[ 



DID YOU RAISE 300 BUSHELS OF 
POTATOES PER ACRE THIS YEAR ? 



If you did not you are losing part of your profits. 
Potatoes at almost f, 2.00 per bushel are the most 
profitable crop on the farm. Our book, 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop' 

will insure your full profits. Write to-day for 
your copy. 



• Local AOncr Maaa.»r 
THE COE-HOaTlrlER COMPANY, SI Chambers St., New Tort City 

RofwidbUT of the American Asricoltitiml < hwmlrai <n. 

N...f»ci.rer..r E . FRANK C0E FERTILIZERS 
1857 flTf ariJssi TarsMW* Suaaar. ff stay T— it 1917 




























The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan^3^1911 



1916 NOTES 

You really cannot size up a 
senior class when they are being 
anaesthetized in full dress mourn- 
ing at commencement. At such 
times the obituary ceremonies im- 
part an expression of profound 
experience approaching close to 
grandeur. When we left the 
campus last June a bunch of almost 
seniors was gazing doubtfully at a 
pair of rather large empiy shoes. 
Wouldn't it be grand to go back and 
fasten our critical old orbes on this 
flock of young Atlases under natural 
conditions as they go about their 
work in our discarded footgear! 
Wonder if the old brogans rattle 
about much ! Aussi, we all want to 
see the new head waiter, the '16 
scrub faculty, Cwerae de Mewidor, 
the new micro, building, Mr. Browu, 
the freshman class, etc., etc., and all 
the events planned for the fourth 
annual midwinter alumni day, 
Feb. 9. 

Krnest Russell, farmer on the 
home farm in Hadley. As a profit- 
able side line Russell sells raw ma- 
terials for fertilizers for A. W. Hig- 
gins (If. A. C. '07). For two 
months in the fall he was substitute 
teacher in Hopkins academy. 

Rumors, rumors, rumors ! Some- 
body got it of somebody else, that 
the Senior Huntington is building a 
new house on the estate, where 
Charlie lives (down in Poquonock, 
you know). What be you, Charlie, 
thinking seriously ? 

Acushnet, Mass. "Nothing much 
has happened to me since leaving the 
old 'coll' except many miraculous 
escapes from drowning this summer 
while tilling the fruitful ( ?) fields. 
We had a flood in this section that 

put old Noah's to shame "—Ben 

Gilmore. Ben has bought a new 
flivver. Who says farming doesn't 
pay big ? 

Leon F. Whitney is the proud 
father of a nine pound baby daugh- 
ter, Julia by name. 

ELECT NEW OFFICERS 

At a regular meeting of the Stock- 
bridge club Wednesday evening offi- 
ctrs were elected for the remainder 
of the year. They are: President, 
Paul W. Latham '17; secretary, 
Albert B. Loring '17 and vice-presi- 
dent, Hans A. Rorstrora '17. Five 
new member* were taken into the 
club. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan'i 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic liotany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercol. Athletics 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association. 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Iudex, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen ludex, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee. 



C. A. Peters, Secretary — 454- W 
H. M. Gore, Secretary— 403-31 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403- M 
H. E. Bobbins, Manager— res. 62- W 
L. T. Buckman, President — 416 
.1. A. Chapman, Manager— 8311 
B. I). Hawley, Mauager— 8314 
O. S. Flint, Manager— 544-11 
M. R. Lawrence, Manager— 8347 
N. Moorhouae, Manager— 8:tB4 
S. F. TuthilL President— 416 
A. F. Williams, Manager— 8364 
1). M. Lipshires, Mauager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— 8317 
K. ||. Boffin, Mauager— 8364 
1). O. Merrill, President — 416 
.1. II. Day, President— 8377 
L. T. Buckman, President— 116 
M.J. McNamara, President— 580 
O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



CARS 



Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 7-10, S.10, 
9 io, 10-20, and at 20 minutes past the 
hour until 11-20 p. at. 



CARS 



ALUMNI INDORSE CLASS TALKS 

JContlnaed from page ll 

bridge Hall. This gathering fur- 
nishes opportunity to discuss with the 
President various college and alumui 
questions. Any alumnus having any 
ideas, questions or propositions for 
consideration at this time should for- 
ward his suggestion to Charles H. 
Gould, Massachusetts Agricultural 
college. It *«, of course expected 
that men making the suggestions will 
be on hanrl to present them. 



Thara are Seven Good Keaion* why you »hould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. ILELDBR 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

•7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunche s, Soda, Ice Cream 

CUivi inly fr*m 1 A, At tt 4 * ■ Af 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Truckage -nodern 
Equipment Train Dispatch- 
ing 5j «tcm r reight and hx- 
press Service over entire Hoe. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Leave AmherM for M- A. C at 6 05. 6 !$• 
7 00, 7 30, 8 00. 8-15, 9.15. 9 3°. ,ol 5. »°-3°. 
11-15, n jo, 12-30, 12-45. «\J°. '45 and at 
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at 10-30 and 1 1 00 f. M. 
Last car at 12-30 a. m. 

Special Car* at Reasonable Rate* 



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delivered. G*aU* overcoats, witt.. pint* ii>« 
coatt. Ladles* fine ta salts a *PfJ»»f* . 
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Kear Nash BFa, Amherst. Tat. »• V» ' 



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Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



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For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
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are finished examples of our product* 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

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HreaiRBonA* 11. A*»* a**"' 



:c 



Saj 

U 






AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 30, 1917. 



M. A. C. AND MASS. TECH 
BATTLE TO STANDSTILL 

Neither Side Able to Score. Soft 

Condition of Ice Makes Passing 

Impossible. 

M. A. C. and Massachusetts Tech 
battled through two five-minute over 
time periods, on the college rink this 
afternoon, neither side being able to 
score. Both sides were handicapped 
by the soft condition of the ice which 
slowed up the contest considerably 
and made passing impossible. Not- 
withstanding this both teams put up 
a stiff fight. 

Tech started off the first half with 
a rash, but the poor condition of the 
ice prevented any results. The for- 
wards attempted to play the banks, 
but the best they could do was to get 
a couple of tries at the M. A. C. goal. 
Bnttrick easily stopped these. For 
Aggie the brilliant work of L. Rosa 
in carrying the puck from his own 
defense to the enemies goal featured. 
Neither side was able to make their 
shots count, however, and the half 
ended 0-0. 

In the second period both teams 
were more aggressive. Clark of Tech 
put a scare into the Aggie rooters 
by coming down the rink with a clean 
riuk in front of him for an easy shot. 
Bnttrick saved the day for Aggie, 
however, by blocking it. During the 
over time periods the play was in the 
visitors territory most of the time but 
the Aggie shooteis were unable to 
get a tally. 

The line-up : 



PROF. WAUGH BECOMES 
U. S. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 

Under Government Forest Service. 

To Outline Policies for Treatment 

of Timber Areas. 



m. a. e, 

liuttrick, g («\-ipt ) 
I.. Kow, p 
I). Rosa, ep 
Kii-hanUoii, lw 
Mile*, «• 
Heavey, rw 
' l.iaholm, r 



M. 1. I 

ti. Ijowengxrd 
p, Tootein 

< ;i |.i . 1 . |., Ooehraa 

lw. Wait 

c, (lark 

rw, limner 

r. < atthiii 



Bo on M . a. r. 0, m i i u. hefvree 

Vcednam i»l .Springfield. Timers— 

Lawrence and ttoper. Time — I5-niin- 

halve* and iwo 5-miiin»«< overtime 

• rind*. 



SENIOR CLASS ELECTIONS 
The permanent officers of the class 
>f 1917 will be elected at the class 
'Meeting and Smoker Wednesday, 
fas. 81, at T-tMi p. m.. in the Social 
11 ion. Beside the regular officers 
the following will be elected: chatr- 
■'•n of the class day, picture, and 
tap mad gown committees, and the 
■ class, and campus orators. The 
•lass gift committee will report at 
this time and the class will take ac- 
tion on the matter. 



M. A. C. is again brought into 
prominence through the selection of 
Prof. Frank A. Waugh, head of the 
department of horticulture and land- 
scape gardening, to become consult- 
ing landscape architect to the l r . S. 
Forest Service He has beeu 
granted six months' leave of absence 
beginning April 1. The employ- 
ment of Professor Waugh marks a 
new era in the development of the 
national forests of the United States, 
comprising as they do an area of 
150,000,000 acres, or about four 
times the size of New Knglsnd. In 
these forests are found the finest 
pieces of natural landscape in the 
country and it is with a \iew to mak- 
ing this scenery accessible to the 
people that the forest service now 
contemplates developing the forests 
along practical landscape lines. 
Over a million and a half people use 
the national forests as playgrounds 
each year, and the number is still 
growing. The allotment of camp 
sites in forest areas without definite 
plans has greatly complicated the 
problems of water supply and sewage 
disposal for the thousands who now 
use, and the many more who will 
soon use, the forests for camping 
purposes. One of the first problems 
wbich will confront Professor Waugh 
will be that of the Imperial valley 
in Southern California, where, be- 
cause of the excessive beat of that 
region the truck farmers have been 
compelled to build their homes on 
the high ground of the national for- 
est. The need for a well-planned 
arrangement of their camping space 
is demanding immediate attention. 
A similar situation has arisen in the 
newly acquired White Mountain 
national forest in New Hampshire 
In many other places in the United 
States the forests are being used for 
park and recreational purposes fully 
as much as are the national parks 
themselves, thus making a distinctly 
landscape problem. 

Professor Waugh will work under 
the direction of Henry S. Graves, 
chief forester, formerly head of the 
Vale forestrv school, and a firm be- 
liever in the conservation of the 
national beauties of the forests as 
Continued on pace "I 



COLLEGE TO HAVE RESERVE 
OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS 



Two Tears of Drill Compulsory. Must 

Oo Into 8ummer Encampment. 

Equipment Supplied. 

With the beginning of the third 
term in April, the new system of mili- 
tary training establishing a reserve 
officers training corps, which has been 
adopted by the War Department, will 
go into effect at M. A. C. Although 
full plans have not been received by 
the military department as yet, every- 
thing will probably be arranged by 
the first of April. The M. A. C 
regiment will be considered as an in- 
fantry unit of the United Stales with 
a reserve officers training corps. 
Under the new plan, drill will be com- 
pulsory as usual for freshmen and 
sophomores ; the present junior claas 
will probably finish their course as In 
other years. Uniforms will be fur- 
nished free of cost to these students 
but there will be no other compensa- 
tion. 

At the end of the sophomore year 
those stutVrita wishing to elect the 
military course will make application 
for appointment as officers in the 
reserve officers training corps, and 
such of these applications as are 
approved by the President and the 
bead of the Military Department will 
be appointed officers by the War 
Department and will be allowed the 
regular subsistence allowance of ap- 
proximately lino a year for the Iwo 
years of their instruction. The pres- 
ent juniors will be allowed to elect 
this course with certain restrictions. 
In this way the men in the junior and 
senior classes who will take drill will 
be those selected from a list of appli- 
cant-, volunteering for training. 
These men will be required to take 
special training each summer in the 
summer camps maintained by the 
War Department. 

All equipment such as arms, am- 
munition, etc, will be supplied by the 
War Department and will consist as 
far as possible of the same model guns 
and equipment supplied the regular 
army. Special and distinctive in- 
signia will be issued. In addition to 
the regular infantry units, other 
branches of military service, such ss 
signal corps, etc, may be formed and 
will be equipped by the government 
with horses, machine guns, etc. a» 
may be necessary to the work. 
In order to coordinate this new 

Continued on pact «l 



No. 16 

VERMONT THE ATTRACTION 
FOR ANNIVERSARY CAME 

Eight Colleges on Football Schedule. 

N. H. State Contest to Be Played 

in HaverhUJ. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE— 1917 

Sept. 29 -Norwich on Alumni field 
Oct. 8 Vermont on Alumni field 

(Anniversary game) 
Oct. 13 Dartmouth at Hanover 
Oct. 20— Hiddlebury at Middle- 
bury 
Oct. 27— New Hampshire State at 

Haverhill 
Nov. 8 Tufta on Alumni field 
Nov. 10 -Worcester Tech at Wor- 
cester 
Nov. 17— Springfield Y. X. 0. A. 
College at Springfield 



The varsity football schedule for 
191? has been completed by Man- 
ager John A. Chapman. It consists 
of eight games ; three at home, open- 
ing with Norwich Sept. 29. four away, 
and one on a neutral field at Haver- 
hill Upon tbe whole the season 
does not look as formidable as that 
which tbe 1916 aggregation faced, 
snd should give tbe present coaching 
system a much fairer trial than in 
the past. As a feature of tbe 50th 
anniversary celebration tbe Univers- 
ity of Vermont has been taken on. 
This date bad been held open for 
some time while negotiations were 
carried on with Penn. State ami 
Michigan Aggie, but without success, 
due to schedule conflicts. Haverhill* 
new stadium offering opportunities 
for capacity and gate receipts, a 
game, tbe first since 1913, was 
scheduled with Hew Hampshire 
State. This year Tufti comes to the 
campus for the annual gridiron 
struggle. Uhim doing away with the 
trip to Medford every year. The 
Springfield game at Springfield con- 
cludes a well balanced schedule. 



ABOLISH MAJOR TALKS 

"No major talks for us" was the 
sentiment expressed in a 1019 elsei 
meeting at which it was voted to 
abolish major talks this year, Be- 
cause many of the sophomores have 
already selected their special work it 
was thought that these talks would 
be unnecessary for the class. It is 
a fact, also, that the ill repute into 
wbich the major talk as an institution 
has fallen, was a factor which in- 
fluenced the adverse vote. 




i 



esscm 



^^^^^B! 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30.^917^ 



YALE BARELY NOSES OUT 

A VICTORY OVER VARSITY. 

Though the varsity hockey team 
met defeat at the hands of the Yale 
puck chasers Wednesday night at 
the New Haven Arena the 5 to 3 
score is a very good indication of 
the closeness of the match. The 
Yale septet got a good start in the 
very first part of the period and 
another at the close. It was at this 
point in the game that the "Aggie" 
team came to its own, however. 
After a long ruBb down the ice, Rich- 
ardson at left wing received a 
pass from the center of the rink and 
shot a pretty goal from a difficult 

angle. 

The "Aggie" defence stiffened in 
the second half and the contest con- 
tinued with fortune see-sawing from 
one side to the other, during 
which time both scored two goals. 
The first of these occurred after nine 
minutes of play when Chisholm 
broke lose from a scrimmage and 
eluding the Yale defence, drove the 
disc into the net. "Bud" Ross, the 
whirlwind point of the "Aggie" team, 
played his usual strong game and 
scored the final M. A. C. tally after 
13 minutea of play, while Captain 
Buttrick kept the crowd on edge with 
his remarkable stops. 

The game was a rough one and 
many penalies were incurred. The 
style of game shown by both sides 
was lacking in team work. Captain 
Murray was the star of the Yale de- 
fence, while Armour and Van Noa- 
trand worked well in the offense. 

TALE. 

York, g 



VARSITY QUINTET ROLLS 

UP BIG SCORE WITH R. I. 

Playing in even better form than 
in last week's game with C. A. C, 
the varsity basketball quintet had 
little trouble in handing out a crush- 
ing defeat to Rhode Island State last 
Saturday in the Drill hall, the final 
score standing 31 to II. The team 
that faced M. A. C. was much im- 
proved over that which suffered a 
64 to 4 defeat at the hands of Am- 
herst a few weeks ago, but was never- 
theless outclassed. The Rhode 
Islanders lacked the clean cut type 
of passing game exhibited by the 
home team. The Aggie forwards, 
Pond in particular, were especially 
clever in this department of the 
game, eluding one opponent after 
another by skillful side stepping and 

passing. 

The outcome of the game was 
never in question after the first few 
minutes of play, in which the Rhode 
Island basket was made the target 
for many Aggie shots, the majority 
of which went wild. Sterling the 
second half with a lead of eight points, 
McCarthy, Pond and Grayson began 
to make their shots count and at the 
end of the game each member of this 
trio had four baskets to his credit. 
E. Grayson proved his worth at 
shooting fouls, missing only one out 
of eight tries. The Rhode Island 
team had three good men in Spencer, 
LeBoeuf and Malloy and most of 
their team play involved this trio. 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 

FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
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Fret- delivery to Amherst of 
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JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Murray, p 
Bierwirth, cp 
Lauirblln, lw 
Mclllwalne «.■ 
Stanley, rw 
Armour, r 

Sr.ire: Yale 5, 
union*— "Aggleu," 



M. A. O. 

g, Buttrick 

p, L. Ross 

cp, D. Rose 

lw. Richardson 

c, Chisholm 

rw, Seavey 

r, Stiles 

M. A. C. 8. Subati- 
Uarwood for Stileit. 
Yale— Griggs for Laugblin. Baker for 
Griggs, Van Nostrand for Mclllwaine, 
Kelley for Stanley, Ward for Kelley. 
Referee -Kyuan. Umpire— McKinnon. 
Time— 20 minute halve*. 

FIRST. 

Laugblin, Yale, 7-30. 
Stanley, Yale, 11-20. 
Van Nostrand, Yale, 18-ltt. 
Richardson, M. A. C. 10-40. 
BEcoxn. 
Scoring: Stanley, Yale, 8-60. 

Chisholm, M. A. C. »-20. 
Murray, Yale, 10-40. 
L. Ross, M. A. C. 13-40. 



m. A. r. 

McCarty, Squires, If 
Pond, Irving, rf 
E. Grayson, 



K. I. STATE. 

rg, LeBoeuf 

Ik, Malloy, Smith 

c, Goddard, Malloy 



. Grayson, Park burst, Ig 

rf, Lawrence, Gray 
Sedgwick, Pond, rg », Spencer 

Score-M. A. C. 31, Rhode Island 11. 
Baskets from floor-McCarthy 4,Pond 4, 
E. Grayson 4, Spencer. Lawrence, Gray. 
Malloy. Baskets from free tries— 
E. Grayson 7. Spencer I. Referee- 
Reed. Timer— Crowe. Time— 20-min- 
ii it- halves. 

TO RUN WORCESTER 



Scoring: 



LANDSCAPE MEN TRIUMPH 
Answering a long deferred bowling 
challenge from the Florist and Gard- 
ener* Club, the Landscape Club de- 
feated the Grave Diggers and Decor- 
ators by a margin of 74 pies. The pills 
were rolled last Friday evening at 
Metcalf's Alleya. 

The personnel of the dabs is as 
follows : 



/ 



LANDSCAPE CLUB. 

Prof. F. A. Waugb 
Bain, (grad) 
Clancy, (special) 
Campbell, (special) 
Hance, '18 



V. AND O. CLUB. 

Lydiard 17 
Boyd '18 
Duncan *18 
HlU '11 (Woods) 
Sehwah '17, 



Maroon Relay Team to Meet Tech 
Runners at B. A. A. Meet Saturday. 
Prospects aeem good for a win in | 
the B. A. A. meet in Boston Satur- 
day, Feb. 3, when the varsity relay 
team runs Worcester Poly tech. W. 
P. I. will work especially hard in the 
race to make up for their overwhelm- 
ing defeat by Aggie laat year at the 
Ninth Regiment races and the mix up 
at the B. A. A. classic in which a spill 
by one of the Worcester men resulted 
in a decision of no race. In the Coast 
Artillery games last Saturday the 
maroon team made much faster time 
than the Worceater four so prospects 
look bright for even better work 
against Polytech. Howew, thsse 
comparative times were made under 
different conditions since the dletance 
to be run will be longer, 70 yards per 
man, in the B. A. A. •vsnt. The 
four best men will make the trip, re- 
gardless of last weeks' team. H. A. 
Pratt is entered for the 600 bnt he 
may not be able to ran. 



Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 
office Boms: 1-3, ?-* p. ■• Bundaj sad 

other hours by appointment. 

Croysdale I tin 

SOUTH IfADLKV, MASS 

Good Beds and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone WHS-W. Molyoke. 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar l. Mcculloch 



54 Suffolk St. 



Holyoke, Mass. 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



Cox Sons & Vining 

7 s Madison Ave., New York 

Caps 
Gowns 

J ^ floods 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLERGY AND CHOIR 




RAHARS INN 



Norttaaiptoii, Maaaaehaaetu 

EUBOrftAM PLAN 

Tne MM Place to ©»»• 

ftflMsefttaVefi 

Special I uncheon from 1 1 -90 to J p. ni 

A la carta ssrrtcc 

6-30 a.m. la 11-30 a.m. 



=■ 

aaatts 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Grown by the Floricaltural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

(1ROWN ON THE CAMPUS 
Telephone S06 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOT hi. 



R. J. RAHAR, Prop. 



- 



Club Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 

Business UK's Luncheon, 60c 
SiPdiyTiBled' Hot! Dinner, $l.?5 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1917. 



VARSITY FIVE TO PLAY 

NEW HAMPSHIRE SATURDAY 

New Hampshire State college will 
be the third team to face the M. A. 
C. basketball quintet in Saturday's 
game to be played at Durham. The 
M. A. C. team has two victories so 
far, while New Hampshire has one 
victory and two defeats, losing to 
Springfield V . M .('. A. and Wesley an. 

The upstate quiutet defeated C. A. 
C. by a score of 32-23, while M. A. 
C. downed Connecticut with the score 
33-12. The New Hampshire basket- 
ball five under Coach Colwell is the 
strongest ever playing for the Blue 
and White, and as M. A. C. has won 
both of the games so far played, after 
several years out of the basket game, 
a close contest will be expected on 
the New Hampshire door. 

The line-up of New Hampshire 
State will be as follows : rb, Aulis ; 
lb, Davis ; c, Hawkes ; rf , Stevens ; 
If, Badger (Capt.). The M. A. C. 
line-up is uncertain, but a fast squad 
will make the trip. 

FRESHMEN WIN 5 1 

The game scheduled for Saturday 
afternoon with Fittsfleld high was 
cancelled and a game was arranged 
with Amherst High instead, in which 
the "Aggie" underclass men were 
easily the winners. Ball Crafts, and 
Spencer played well for the freshmen, 
Spencer scoring three of his teams 
points. 



m. a « uao. 

Doueette, e, 

Smith, |i 
l>tniulas>.<-|i 
(rafts, r 
Hall. <• 
Spencer, lw 



AMIIKIiST H. S. 

if, Levlne 

p, Dickinson 

cp, Millies 

r, Haabroack 

c, Powers 

lw. Sanctuary 



ItriMiiiH. Mallon, rw Iw.Kenney, tiarvey 

Scarp- If. A, 0. ltraO 5, Amherst 0. 

tiuals scored — by Ball, Crafts, ami speti- 

eefS. Referee — I.. Ross T7. Time— 20- 

mimite halves 



DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

Osteopath 



Central Chambers, (enter Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

Phone 1027-W 

AMHERST SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

The Beat Shine In Town. 

— Ainu 

Mime Kc?i»c >lrliif£ 

Si-,itH and Huirkly ilnm-. 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Beat 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown. 

OGRAM CHANGED DAILY 



SOPHOMORES NOW LEAD 

IN INTERCLASS SERIES 

In the interclass basketball games 
Friday evening the sophomores kept 
their record clean by defeating 1918 
in a loosely played contest. The 
second year men played a good pass- 
ing game and also put up a flue ex- 
hibition of shooting. Crowe and 
Whittle together garnered in 20 of 
their team's 30 points. 

The score for the 1918-1919 game 1 

.Jl'N'IOKS KOt'HO&IDIiKS 

Minor, (Gillette), It If, OlOWe 

Thompson, (l'opp), rf rf, Peterson 

Gillette, (Cotton), « c, Blancbard 

Gray, lb lb, Williams 

Lipskirea, rb rb, Whittle 

Score -lflll», :«); 191H, 11. Goals from 
floor— Minor 2, Gillette, Crowe 5, Whit- 
tle 5, Blancbard 2, Peterson. Goals 
from fouls— Gillette 3, Popp 2, Peterson 
4. Referee — Ashley of Amherst, Time 
20 minute halves. 

1917 vs. 1920 

The first half of the senior-fresh- 
mati game was hard fought and 
ended with the last year men only 
one point in the lead, 10-9. Id the 
second half, however, the senior 
quintet gradually pulled away from 
the lighter freshman team. When 
the final whistle blew they had piled 
up a 20 to 12 lead. Graves played 
especially well for 1920, while Mack, 
Harlow, and Kelsey were responsible 
for the seniors' high score. 

Score for 1917-1920 game 1 

SKMOKH KKKHIIMKN 

Uarlow. II If, Ball 

Kelsey, rf rf, Graves 

Ma<k, <■ e, Taylor, (Armstrong) 

Day, lb lb, Littletiehl 

HiKginhotham, (Kostrotn). rb 

rb, Herman 
Score— 1917, 20: 1!»20, 12. Goals from 
floor— Mack 1, K.-lscy ft, Harlow g. 
Graven 4, liftman. Goal* from fouls- 
Mack 4, Ball 2. Iteferee — Ashley, Am- 
herst. Time— 20 minute halves 



The standing of 


the classes in the 


interclass 


basketball aeries 


is as fol- 


Iowa: 










W..II 


Leal 


Per 'fin 


l'.'p.t 


4 





1000 


1!M7 


:i 


1 


1M 


MO 


1 


:{ 


M0 


1!»1H 


it 


4 


000 



HOCKEY SEVEN TO MEET 

WEST POINT SATURDAY 

The M. A. ('. hockey team will 
play West Point Saturday at West 
Point. The Army was defeated by 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. college, laat 
Wedneaday, 4 to .'5. while the Aggie 
seven defeated the same team 9 to 1 
in the first game of the season. 
Springfield is the only team that has 
been met by both teams thus far this 
season and the result gives Aggie 
the advantage on the baals of com- 
parative scores. The team will leave 
for New York on the sleeper Friday 
night, taking the train the next 
morning for Weat Point, where .the 
game will be played in the afternoon. 
The team will return that night by 
sleeper to Springfield. With the 
good showing made against the 
strong Dartmouth and Yale teams, 
much ia expected of the team when 
they clash with the Army. 



Semi - Annual Clearance Sale 



$3 and $4 Derbys and Soft Hats, ..... Now $2 and $2.50 
Aquascutum Overcoats, Regular Price $28 to $35, Sale Price $20 to $25 

PATRICK MACKINAWS 

Regular Price $«o and $12, . . . NOW $7.50 and $8 

Sheep Lined Coats, Regular Price $18 to $21, 

Sale Price $13.50 to $15.50 
—At— 

CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 

For 10 Days Only 



Come to ua for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

pDR forty y ear* we have rendere d faithful temee. For forty 

* yean we kave tried to make each yeer'a aarviee more nearly 

idul. ■ 1 U untir mg effort hai huill for u t not only The World*! 

Large* Mail Order Seed Bmmh, but alio a World W«fc 

reputation for E ff i ci e ncy and undnputed leadership. The 

Fortieth Anntvenary Edition of BurpeVa Annual, the 

"Leading American S aad Catalog" it tirifhut and 

better than ever. It ia mailed free. A poeteafd will bring it 

W. ATLEE BURPEE ft CO, Seed Grower*, 

Building* Philadelphia 



Page'd Shoo Store 

Largest Stock — Lovvctt Prices 
lCxptTt Kt«Bf>oli*i«ff— Beat leather u«ed 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS llf- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE61AN 



Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
RICHARD W. BMITH '17. Editor-in-Chief 

MARSHALL O. LANPHEAR '18. Mifln* Editor 
MtLFORD R. LAWRENCE '17. Aaalatant Kdltor 
WILLIAM SAVILLE. JR. '17. Alumni Editor 



AB8O01ATK KlHTOKH. 

JOHN T. DI/.KK '17 

JOSEPH F- WHITNEY 17 
FRANK J. HINKBMH 

NATHAN W. GILLETTE "ti 

ELIOT M. BUFKUM '10 

MYRTON V. EVANS 13 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MERRILL P. WARNER 17. Kusineu Manager 
JAMEB P. POWELL 'IB. 

Asaietant Kuaiueaa Manager 

RIROER R. ROSEQl 1ST "IS. 

A dvfM lining Manager 

Subscription 12.00 per year. Single 
copies, 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as aecond-claaa mattsratths Amherat 
Post office. 



▼ol. Hill. Taasiay. Jan. M. No. 16 



The ways of showing class spirit 
are many and varied. Sometimes a 
class biirtts forth in soul-stirring 
yells, thereby allowing the "pep" 
needed to cheer iU teams on to 
victory. Once in a long while we can 
imagine a class manifesting its Bpirit 
in the more calm form of a holy zeal 
for excellence in scholastic standing. 
Agaiu it shows itself in the laudable 
ambition of the men to know each 
other better, thereby binding the class 
together in stronger ties of friendship, 
lint the class of 1920 has taken ad- 
vantage of an opportunity to show its 
spirit in s different way, by making 
good, as a class, the sum of money 
expected as its share toward the com- 
pletion of Alumni field. Individuals 
were merged in one whole clsas, with 
the result that now the field fund is 
better off by 1700, not in pledges but 
cash. Without undue flattery we can 
say that the freshmen have set a pre- 
cedent for the succeeding classes 
which will stand as an example of 
pull-together spirit for many years to 
come. 



Wkdnkshav, Jan. 81 
2-10 i\ M.— Assembly. Mr. Dennis A, 
MiH-Caiiliy.l'net and Lecturer. 
MX) i'. m.— Interfraternit.v Relay Races. 
e X vs. (J. T. V. 
<t>2 K vs. 2 + E 
K I '!• vs. B K + 

ri-4") I-. m.— Orobestr* Rehearsal, Hostel 

I'm ion. 
tj-45 r, M.-SlockbridKe Club Meet log, 

Btoekbridge Ball., Room MJS« 
1AM ,. M _ Agricultural EoonomiCi 

Club meeting, (lark Hall. 

Kkihav, Kkis. 8. 
.Vim r. m.— Movies in Bteakbridge Hall, 
on Irrigation run by the de- 
partment ol A«iieultural 
ttoonomtoB. 
r>-00 i>. \i. — Interfrateinity Relay Races. 
S + E vs. Q. T. V. 

K S vs. A X A 
AS* vs. Kl' + 
7-00 i». m. -Apollo Quartet of Boston, 

Stockbridge Hall. 
7-00 p, m.— Inlerclass Basketball, 1917 
vs. 1»1». 191H vs. 1920. 

Sa ti i;i»ay, Feu. I 
7-00 i\ m.— Movies, Stockbridge Hall, 
10 reels of Triangle Films. 
Varsity Hockey, M. A. G. vs. 
West Point, at West Point. 
Varsity Basketball, M. A. C. 
vs. New Hampshire .Slate at 
Durham, N T - H. 
Freshman Hockey, Willistoit 
Seminary at Easlhampton. 
Freslimau Basketball, Wil- 
braham Academy, at Wil bra- 
il am. 

Sunday, Fkh. 4. 

9-10 a. m. -Chapel, Rev. F. H. Decker, 
Church House, Providence, 
R. I. 

Monday, 6 
r.-iHi i-. >i — Interfraternity Relay Races. 
A X A vs. * 2 K 
K 2 vs. AZ* 
B K ♦ vs. e X 



FRATERNITY RACES ENTER 

SEC0RD HALF OF SCHEDULE 

Another week has been rounded 
out in the interfraternity relay con- 
tests with the fastest time of the series 
being made in the first race of 
the week by Lambda Chi Alpha at 
2-14. This time does not compare 
with the time made last year, in the 
county relay serieB, by the Middlesex 
county runners at 2.08 2-5. The first 
series" ended with the following vic- 
tors : Q. T. V. over Kappa Gamma 
Phi ; Kappa Sigma over Theta Chi ; 
Alpha Sigma Phi over Sigma Phi 
Epsitoa. Friday's races went to 
Lambda Chi Alpha over Q. T. V. ; 
Kappa Sigma over Sigma Phi Kpsi- 
lon ; Phi Sigma Kappa over Beta 
Kappa Phi. A change in the schedule 
brought Lambda Chi Alpha and Q. 
T. V. together early. The rewards 
of victor were captured on Monday 
by Lambda Chi Alpha over Kappa 
Gamma Phi ; Alpha Sigma Phi over 
Theta Chi ; Q. T. V. over Beta Kappa 

Phi. 
The following iB the standing of 

the fraternities I 



I'KIMKNT- 
WON. l.i'ST. AflK. 



Kappa Sigma 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Alpba Sigma Phi 
Q. T. V. 

Signs Phi Epsitoa 
Kappa (jam ma PW 
Beta Kappa Phi 
Theta Chi 



4 
4 

4 

:i 
I 
1 
o 










1 

3 
I 
4 
4 
4 



1000 
1000 
1000 
876 
625 
333 
000 
000 
000 



ALUMNTDAY 

A Course of Major Talks All Within 
24 Hours. Wonderful Opportun- 
ity for Students. 

To see, hear and know what a real, 
live, successful Aggie alumnus is, is 
the privilege extended to students of 
all four classes on Alumni Day. The 
undergraduates have never before 
had the opportunity of learning first 
hand the professional experiences of 
bo large a number of alumni These 
men are returning to college for the 
express purpose of shedding a little 
light on some of the questions Hint 
puzzle the uudergraduale. Those 
men who are Bkeptical regarding the 
value of this or that course ; those 
who would like to understand a little 
more fully the problems that their 
major holds for them when they be- 
gin to practice ; those who want a 
little more information before they 
choose a major will have the chance 
to profit by the experience of those 
who have gone through the same 
college training. 

Most of the classes that meet on 
Friday will have one or more alumni 
addressing the class in place of the 
regular instructor. These slumni 
lectures are open to all studentB who 
have an opportunity to attend, and 
are not restricted to those men study- 
ing in the particular department un- 
der whose supervision they are given. 
A complete schedule of all events 
will appear in the next issue of the 
Collegian. 






APOLLO QUARTET 

In Auditorium Friday Evening. Also 
Readings by Lsiper'19. 
The Apollo quartet of Boston will 
give a concert in the Auditorium on 
Friday evening, Feb. 2, at 7 o'clock, 
under the auspices of the Social 
Union. The Apollo quartet has been 
justly popular for their concert work 
around Boston, where they art always 
well received. Tkay made a decided 
hit here at Aggie when they ware 
presented last, two years ago. A 
special feature of the entertainment 
will be readings by McCarrol H. 
Leiper '19. Admission will be free 
to those holding Social Union tickets 
and 50 cants to all othars. 



INDOOR TRACK MEET 

To be Held March 10. Interclass 
Relays to Count in Score. 
The annual interclass indoor track 
meet will probably be held Saturday 
March 10. Tbt usual events of 
high jump, pole vault, shot put and 
dashes will be ran off at that time, 
and prior to this there will be a 
series of interclass relay races the 
scores of which will count in the 
score of the meet. The first race 
will be run Tuesday, Feb. 13, and a 
aeries will be run each week until 
the meet. The managers of the 
teams will draw for opponents in the 
the first races. Then the respective 
winners and losers will oppose each 
other. Then the teams will draw 
for opponents for the third, and the 
fourth race will bt run similarly to 
the second. The first set of two 
races will be two laps to a man and the 
second three laps. The fastest team, 
or the winner of the winners, in each 
set will score five points, the second 
three points, and the third one point 
so that a possible score of 10 may be 
made by a team. Ibis "round 
robin" relay was used Buccessfully 
last year in running the races. 




Why pay more? 

We don't make to measure but 
we do make to fit ! 

Besides, the fit you see before 
you order. 

At the Amherst House : 

Wednesday. February 21at 

Complete Spring showing. 
Same moderate prices prevail- 
ing as in our four stores in New 

York. 

♦'Your money back" should 

anything go wrong. 

mail oaasw rii.i.ai' 

Rogers Pbet Company 



Broadway 
at 18th St. 

it mad way 
at Warren 



"Tha 

Four 

Corners. " 

NEW YORK CITY 



Broadway 
at Mth St. 

Fifth Af. 
at <U at St 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1917. 



LOSE CLOSE RACE 

Rhode Islanders Nose Out Maroon 
Relay Team at Coast Artil- 
lery Meet 

M. A. C. was defeated in the first 
relay race of the year by the quartet 
from Rhode I slum! at the annual 
coast artillery games held in Boston 
last Saturday night. Rhode Island 
held the lead all the way but had to 
break the track record in order 
to win. Gardner chose the pole and 
was pitted against Uuinhridge of 
the Aggies. Gardner gave a lead 
to Reid who held the distance 
against Clough. while Yesaii of M. 
A. C, and Woods of Rhode Island 
ran two Inp.s without a change in the 
gap between them. Pratt, the au- 
chor man of M. A. (.'., made a des- 
perate effort against Greenhalge, 
running the first lap in somewhat 
less time than his opponent, but he 
lacked the punch and the Rhode 
Islander pulled away from him, 
crossing the tape a few yards in the 
lead. The time of the race was 2 
minutes, 33 seconds. 



PROF BEAUMONT OF CORNELL 
TO HEAD AGRONOMY DEPT. 

Prof. A. R. Beaumont of Cornell 
University has been appointed Asso- 
ciate Professor of Agronomy at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
and acting head of that department. 
Mr. lieaumont graduated from the 
Kentucky State university in 1908, 
and since that time tins taught in the 
North Bend, Oregon, high school, the 
Oregon State Normal school, aud at 
Cornell university. At the latter in- 
stitution he has been assistant it) the 
department of Soil Technology while 
pursuing work for an advanced 
degree. Mr. Beaumont comes with 
higbcHt recommendations from the 
authorities at Cornell university, and 
from school officials in Oregon, under 
whom he served. Mr. Beaumont will 
take up his work at Amherst March I. 



. TOWN HALL. 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY, JAN. 29, 30 

Mae Murray in "To Have and to Hold" 

Paramount Feature 

Third Episode of "Gloria's Romance" 

Maturing Blllle Burke 

BLACK DIAMOND COMKMY 

THURSDAY 

Douglas Fairbanks in "The Habit of 

Happiness"— Tnan« It- Feature 
TIIK BLACKSMITH BHOP- Keystone 

2-reel Coined} 
I'AKAMor.vr PlcTouitAi'ii The Maga- 
zine mi t he Screen 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

DiiKtin Farnuin in "Ben Blair"- 

niuunt Feat u rt* 
Paths News, Burton Holmes Tntv 
rieg and Brav Cartoon 



Para- 



I N. 



TOTAL SCORE OF 922 



Smaller Bullaeye Hampers Rifle Team 
Somewhat in First Hatch. 

The results of the first match shot 
by the rifle team this season have 
been sent to Washington. It is not 
known who their opponents were, 
probably because all entries had not 
been made so that the list of com- 
petitors could be arranged. Although 
the results seemed a little low, it is 
primarily because of the smaller 
bulls eye in use this year. Captain 
Canlett thinks that the scores were 
very good because of the fact that 
the best men averaged nearly the 
same. The second match is being 
shot this week and the results must he 
in Washington by Thursday, Feb. 1. 

The score of the first five men is as 
follows : 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The standing in the competition for 
positions on the editorial board of the 
Coi.i.kgun up to Jan. 6, 111 1 7 is 
printed below. The competition 
closes March I . 



NAME. 

A. N. Bowen '19 

E. C. Stack pole MK 
li. W. Harwood '1H 
L. C. Higgins'18 
A. L. (handler 'lit 
G. N. Beck '19 

W. S. Sawyer *18 
P. F. Hunnewell '1M 

F. Schenkelberger 'Is 
T. H. Reuman'lM 



TOTAL POINTS. 

.SO. 81 

i7.;»H 

16.53 

16.94 

13.46 

13.35 

10.91 

9.88 

4.87 

3.60 



Kvciy Afternoon, at S o'rloek, . ntirt? house JOe, 

children 6c. 

Kxery K\ filing, at K O'clock, entire tlnor 15i-, 

tw Irony Me. 

Beg "Hii> - "pens at fcSS anil 7-:«l o'clock. 

UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

K M.I l l i; SITNDAT HKRVICK AT 7 P. M. 

WHITE'S MUSIC STORE 



THE 



United States Hotel 

Heacli, UBOOlB and hinunton Sts , 
BOSTON, r\ASS. 



Only two block)* from South Terminal Sla 
tion, ami easily reached from North Station 
by Klmated Hallway, and convenient alike 
to the ifteat retalliiilio|iNiaii(i buaineu centre, 
also to the tln-atii-, and places of Interest. 

European Plan $1.00 per Day 
and Upwards 

l.iliir ami terries UtMurpaaMd, 

Booklet and in ;i | > hcii t QPOB application 

TILLY HAYNES, JAMES C. HICKEY, 
Proprietor Manager 






IIKMIY K. 

-)i Maim Hrm«i. 



WIllTK 

NrttiTii A Mi- 1 1 







SlANM.M.. 


PfcOMI . 


Total 


F. 


H. Canlett 


!>1 


D7 


1KM 


A 


U. Loring 


1»1 


95 


l.sti 


E. 


B. Taylor 


*M 


wr, * 


IM 


K. 


F. Parson* 


86 


H 


iKo 


( . 


K. Pbippn 


H3 


09 


\*2 




Team total 






W2 



COMBINED MUSICAL CLUBS 
RENDER PLEASING PROGRAM 

Before an appreciative audience 
of over 600, the combined musical 
lubs of M. A. C. and Tufts gave 
■ne of the best concerts of the year 
in the Academy of Music, North- 
ampton, Saturday. The atyle of 
music rendered by the two clubs 
"ras entirely of a different order, but 
both were masters of their own art. 
Tnfts* program contained several 
liege numbers, most nil of which 
took well. Among the M. A. C. 
features that were especially good 
were the Hawaiian sextet selections 
"iid *«Fiddle and I," by Harlan 
Worthley, soloist. Both clubs were 
t'beral with their encores. 



SPEAKERS FOR THE WEEK 

Rev. Frank 11. Decker of Church 
House, Providence, R. I., will speak 
at Sunday chapel, Feb. 4, on his so- 
cial and religious work Rev. Deck- 
er is a well known religious worker, 
and he has written the book "A 
Christian's Experience of God." 

President Kenyou L. Butterfleld 
will speak at assembly, Feb. 7. on 
student government. After the ex- 
tended discussion of this subject at 
the forum Prexy's ideas will be of 
interest. After the talk there will 
be a mass meeting. 



NEW BOTANY ASSISTANT 
Mr. Emits Mardfln, Cornell '16, 
has been appointed assistant in the 
department of plant pathology. Mr. 
Mardfln received his degree from 
Cornell University in February and 
went from there to the University of 
Wisconsin, where he studied in plant 
pathology for a semester. He has 
had some practical experience in 
working with plant diseases in the 
Hick's nursery, Westbury, Long 
Island. 



M;nnl..iiii-. i. cnniiit • Hawaiian rknlnlea, I'lekn. 
Strings, etc., and inuaic for all instrumentx and 
all voIcm. In-ttiinieiiiK niai he had on trial. 

HOW IS THE SOLE WITH YOU ? 

<>et join xlioeH ta|i|»"d Bt 

GINSBURGS, Amity St. 

Work neatly done HsIlllaM III Hi guaranteed 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 
Gents' Furnishings 

Pull Dress Suits to Rent 

(Japs and (towns for Sale or Rent 

Also Ladies' Tailoring 

Our Work is Guaranteed 

\\ •■ ilo lijeing. ('leaning, Keiminngatid Trending 
I'll" »N I :■ tt 

1 1 AMITY STREET, AMHERST, MASS. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

GROUPS A SPECIALTY 

Good work speaks for itself. 

NASH BLOCK, AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books 

Agent* for Hex 

F. M. CURRAN 



Fountain Pens 

ryiiewrttri 

C. F. DVF.R 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

- K. I*. MAHHII KRTATr. 



RiTiiiitiin 

Stkimikn Lank Folokh. its*. 

MAJOTAITIININII J KWKtt.KMs 

I HO HKOAUWAY. •• l w YORK 

CI^LTI* AND iih.i.i.1,1 

1'INS AND l/INi.s > 



• OLD. «<i I v i 



AMI* i\Hox/.n MBU»*I.M 




The wise ones read 
our advertisements. 
It pays. 

Kvery young man in 
this country today is 
ambitious— or he's a 
•♦dead one." 

< >ur specialty is 

Clothes for Young; Men 

that have pep. 
MERRITT CLARK • CO., pjorthainptun. 

WHO SAID A MIDNIGHT LUNCH? 

Make it on one of our small 

MOVIES SATURDAY EVENING EleCtnC GrUl StOVOS 

To end a week of activity properly, , Kasy to care for and no danger of fire 
the Social Union committee is billing 1 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT— 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located o»er post office. Up one fltf lit 

Pmslng ill Cleaning a Specialty 

r .ibaral Ticket SyU«a f el. j6-M 

College Stationery 

With Class Numeral*. 

Magazines, Newspapers 
and Fountain Pens 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



ten reels of feature Triangle motion 
pictures for .Saturday evening at 7 p.m. 
Attempts are being made to secure 
a release featuring Donald Fairbanks 
in a five reel thriller. 



Also a good line of 
STUDENT LAMPS UNO APPLIANCES 



RUMERY & FAY, Electricians 



Gallup at Holyoko 

*'rt''97 High M. 



-SELL 



Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx Clothes 

Come down to Holyoke and Me our 
Wf store. 






i 



i 
I 
I 



m 






t 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1917. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

l] Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. UioUen Lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable— Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS PARTY DINNERS 

American and Baropean Phwii 

" BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our specialty— And other good tMagS to eat 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley. Mass, 

Tel. 415 W 

The Highland Hotel 



Dr. A. H. Daniels, D. 0; 

OSTEOPATH M' 1*11 YHK IAN 

305 LAMBIE BL06., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



I'lcplmlit' 



HV\ Vol "It 



Corner of Hillman and Barns 
blocks from the Union Dw«t.l 
telry run on the F.uropean Plan 
from Main Street, away from I m 
and vet -n the center of the mi>m 



, hti«*t4, three 
, a Hinder 11 hos- 
It Is i ust a step 
noise and dust 
■s^ district. 



;,imfortabli*. 
cold running 



Its r»OMis Are well famish* 
having a telephone and hut 

water in .very room. PriCM * < and up: rooms 
with bath (single) • !.!"» »Wl "('• 

[ts excellent cuisine ml *-!• ventil.if< I dining 
room makes a meal a pi-asant memo, v-every 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and ynu will 
anticipate staying there again Music every 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Dental Creams, Toilet Soaps, Shaving Powders, 

••i.'.. .if 

A. W. HAMLIN, AMHERST. MASS. 

I call at the Ooniia SJKl l-'i at .r nil y llou*t». 

The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
ind Fittings tor Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
\utomattc Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. Holyoke, Mm. 

Candies and Ice Cream 

Seniors and Juniors 

Now is the lime to 
buy those 

FILING CASES 

For your Bulletins. 



SENATE MINUTES 

A special raeetiug of the Senate 
was held Wednesday afternoon, Jan. 
24. K. W. Smith and Messenger 
were absent. Pageant Master Lang- 
don was present and discussed the 
matter of the spectacular student 
performance with Alumni field as the 
theme. A committee consisting of 
E Grayson, 8. 8. Smith and Chap- 
man, was appointed to act with Mr. 
Langdouin appointing sub-commit- 
tees from the student body to assist 
in carrying out the performance. 

Acting upon a letter from Pres. 
Huttei field, it was voted to select the 
Friday and Saturday after Thanks- 
giving day in lieu of Jan. 1 ; to begin 
college on Monday afternoons after 
vacations, rather than on Tuesday 
morning (which would mean the 



Highland Hotel. 



S|,rinc<l'ld. Mass. 



Johnson Book Co. 

Babbitt Wooiavokth 

Alpha Simnn IMii Ihrnse. 



transferitig of Monday afternoon 
classes to the follow Saturday 
afternoon. ) 

Voted that the present system of 
half holiday* on Oft. 12, Feb 22, 
April 10 and May .'50, be retained. 

A special meeting of the Senate 
wus held Sunday morning, Jan. 28. 
Day, S. S. Smith and Messenger 
were absent. Voted to accept the 
rules drawn up by the committee on 
Initiative and Referendum, which 
were as follows : 
I. The Initiative. 

A. Any ten members of the stu- 
dent body may submit a petition, in 
writing, to the Senate, demanding 
action upon any subject which they 
deem expedient. 



AMHERST GARAGE CO., inc 

Automobile •uppltea 



B. The Senate shall then consider 
the petition at its next regular meet- 
ing. The following courses of action 
may be followed : 

(a) If rejected, the petition shall 
be returned to its signers with the rea- 
sons for its rejectiou. 

(b) If accepted, the ruling of the 
Senate shall be read at the next 
succeeding assembly. 

(e) On a majority vote of the 
members present, the Senate may 
refer the question to the student 
body for action at the regular 
meeting. 

(a) All proceedings in regard to 
| the petition shall be published with 
the other minutes of the Senate in 
J the Collegian. 

II. The Referendum. 

A. The Senate may, on a major- 
ity vote of the members present at 
any meeting, refer any subject under 
consideration to the student body for 
definite action at the next regular 
mass meeting. 

B, On petition of 100 names 
submitted within one week after the 
publication of the minutes in the Col- 
legian, a petition previously rejected 
by the Senate shall be submitted to 
the student hotly for action. 

Pres, Butterfleld asked that the 
matter of having Sunday Chapels 
next vear he brought before the stu- 
dent IkhIv at the mass meeting on 
Feb. 7. 

The recommendation that the bul- 
letin board be divided into five sec- 
tions : (1) Lost and Found; (S) 



repairing in all its branches 



VULCANIZING 




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PACKERS 4aND POULTRY DRESSERS 

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Beef, Mutton, lamb, \ eal. Pork, Mams, Bacon, Sau- 
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Amherst, Mail. 



WM. M. KIMBALL, Proprietor 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. SO, 1917. 



E.B. DICKINSON, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours • to 12 a. m„ 1-ao to 6 p. u> 

THE BIG FOUR 

Black and White Cigars, 5c 

Black and White Little Cigars, 15c 

Black and White Tweenies. 10c 

Black and White Cigarettes, 10c 

If you have not tried them 
you have missed something. 



HENRY ADAHS & GO. 

The REXALL Store 



0f LAVAL 

Separators 

Save in Seven Ways 

QUANTITY nf tw»Bi that no other »,-|«i 
rator will recover mmpls'tSiI 

QUALITY „f rreain u* e\ lilcnrecl (,jr ih> 
I .a v;il batter always Booting niithent In 
« u-ry important contest. 

I. a hoi; In'every way over any ffMfltf *>•*- 
tern or other separator, 1»» UUUlM 
easier, betnir eaainr to sJSBH ;«n,| r«-- 
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TIMK «ver any gravity system «,r other sei>- 
« rator, by reason of greater raixiHty 
and the same reasons that •..n •• labor. 

• < »ST In that the lie I .aval will lam from tin 
t« twenty rears, while other separators 
wear out and require to be roi>ln,i-«l in 
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PROFIT in more and better limit, Still )«■*» 
labor and effort every tlmr tntlkiis put 
through the in.n liini', 

SATISFACTION whiilnuin.iih mm rroui 
fenowing PMsjMTS the bent seimrator. 
and are at all t imcx ;ii«-..,,i|.ii-iiim; the 
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2» E. Maw»(.\Si, 
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t /hat's on the 
Fertilizer Bag? 

Does your manufacturer 
print on the fertilizer bag, 
how much immediately 
available nitrogen (viz., 
Nitrates) it contains? 
Many do not 
Home mixing is the safe, 
economical method Mix 
your own fertilizers and 
know what you get 

Mj book "Horn* Mixing* Am 
Sand pott card flar it, today. 

WILLIAM S. MYERS 

At*. New York 



For Sale; (3) Class Notices; (4) 
Wanted ; (8) Miscellaneous; to 
eliminate the piesent confusion and 
inadequacy, was read and accepted. 

A committee consisting of West- 
man and Russell was appointed to 
investigate the matter of student 
labor and its distribution to the ad- 
vantage of the greatest number of 
needy students. 

Recommended that a student organ- 
ist he employed. 

MAY OFFER COURSES IN 

Y. M. C. A. TRAINING WORK 

CourseB in county Y. M. C. A. 
work will probably be established at 
at M. A. C. in the near future. In 
regard to this matter, Fred B. Free- 
man of the international committee 
of the Y. M. C. A., Clarence P. 
Shedd and D. C. Drew of the state 
committee met in conference with 
members of the college faculty, and 
students, intending to take up this 
work upon graduation, Saturday ,Jan. 
27. The Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
college sends men here to take 
courses in Rural Sociology before 
graduating aud thus they obtain a 
sound training for solving the rural 
Y. M. C. A. problems. For those 
who have not the time to attend the 
Y. M. C. A. college these proposed 
courses will offer good substitutes. 



TO HAVE A LA CARTE SERVICE 
Within a few weeks the manage- 
ment of the dining hall expects to in- 
stall an a la carte system at the Com- 
mons. Meals will be served through- 
out the morning, a luncheon, and 
dinner. Certain menus will be on 
hand all the time but specialties may 
be called foi and served within a 
few minutes. A special room will 
be partitioned off in the southwest 
corner of the dining ball, where this 
new system will lie given a trial. 
Instead of weekly payments a check- 
ing system will lie put in vogue. 



INSTALL NEW BALLOPTICAN 
A new Bauch and I^omb converti- 
ble Balloptican and micro-photo- 
graphic apparatus has been installed 
in the microbiology building during 
the past week. The balloptican is 
one of the finest in the state, and ii 
may be used as an ordinary stereopti- 
cau, Jo project photographs, or to 
show microscopic slides. This equip- 
ment should do much to improve the 
elliciencv of the department. 



TO FEATURE IRRIGATION 

Irrigation, on what the U. s. 
Reclamation Service Commission 
claims is the most famous potato 
farm in the world, will be shown in 
"movies" at Htockbridge Hall. Feb. 
2. This is another of the scries of 
educational films run by the agrbnl- 
cultural economic department. The 
time is ft-10, 

DR. BROOKS TO LECTURE 
Dr. William P. Brooks of the Kx- 

(H-riment Station will speak befoie the 
Stockbridge Club, Wednesday at 
(,.15 p. m., in Stockbridge Hall, 
Room 102, taking for his nuhjeet 
"How the Experiment Station is of 
the Most Use to the Farmer," 



SHEEP SKIN COATS AND ULSTERS 

at the lowest prices in the state. Incidentally we have the best 
assortment that vou have seen. 



Custom Made Reversible Collared Shirts 

From $1.25 to $4.00 



Some real values. 



Freshmen Toques, 60 Cents 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Hart Scbafliier & Marx Clothes 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Man 



Maim OfMCt: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York Citjf 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists tad most complete 

equipment obtainable 



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E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



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I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1917. 



H. H. S. OUTPLAYS FRESHMEN 

Clever passing and shooting by the 
Hartford high school quintet caused 
the downfall of the Massachusetts 
Aggie freshmen in the drill hall Sat- 
urday afternoon by the score 27-10. 
The freshmen fought on fairly equal 
terms during the first half, but in the 
second Hartford took a spurt which 
left them hopelessly behind at the 
liuish. The work of Lothrop in the 
forward line and Captain Lent in the 
backfield featured the play of the 
first year men, while Luisman and 
R. Cohn put up a strong game for 
Hartford. 

The line-up : 

II \i:ti<>ki» U1011 M A. O. 1910 

l.uisiiian. M. Colin, it 

lb, Lent, LUtlefleM 
GtoetS, U. CJoJM, If rb.Stedman, Viuez/.i 
Sickler. Leyland, a 0, Kichards 

Nordland, Harrows, rb ll>, Lothrop, Lent 
Kiel, lb rb, Davis, Hall 

Score -Hartford Hinh-27; M. A. C 
l-i.sliiii.-n, Hi. Baskets- I.uisman ft, 
GoetsS, Nordland, Leyland, EL OohB 8, 
Lothrop, Mall. Goals from tree tries— 
tioi-t/. :l, Sickler, It. Colin I, LothXOfl «. 
lteferee— Ashley of 'Amherst. Scorer— 
( . Crowe 'If, Time- 80 inluute halves. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses of instruction in twenty-seven teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Rural Journalism 



Floriculture 
Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 
Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Agricultural Economics 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 



OUR RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



«« 



TO HAVE TRAINING CORPS 

(< mi tinned from cage l] 



training service with the regular army, 
the members of the reserve officers 
training corps may apply for appoint- 
ments as Lieutenants in the regular 
army at $K>0 a month for the period 
of six months. However this appli- 
cation and service is to be entirely 
voluntary and is not required by the 
election of the military course. At 
the close of this six months training 
they will become members of the 
reserve officers corps, and in event of 
war would become officers of volunteer 
units. They will also be required to 
take fifteen days' training each year 
in special camps. At the age of 40, 
these officers would be either pro- 
moted or discharged. 



Economic Entomology 
Microbiology 
Economic Botany 
Agricultural Education 
Rural Sociology 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIEL-D. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Iutercol. Athletics 

II. A. C Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Rifle Club, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Eighteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Nineteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 

Interclass Athletic Committee, 



Telephone 

C. A. Peters, .Secretary — 454-W 
H. M. Gore, Secretary — 403-M 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer — 403-M 
11. E. Robbins, Manager — res. 62-W 

L. T. Buckman, President— 416 

J. A. Chapman, Manager— »6 14 

R. D. Hawley, Manager— 8314 

O. S. Flint, Manager— /V44-M 

M. R. Lawrence, Manager — 8347 

N. Moorhouse, Manager— 8.".b4 

S, F. Tuthill, President— 416 

A. F. Williams, Manager — 8364 

D. M. Lipshires, Manager— 416 
K. L. Messenger, Manager— N'. 17 

E. M. Buffura, Manager— 8.S64 

D. O. Merrill, President— 4 16 

J. H. Day, President— 8377 

L. T. Buckman, President — 416 

P. W. Latham, President — 416 

O. G. Pratt, Secretary— 8347 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

CARS 

Leave M. A. C. for Holyoke at 720, 8.10, 
y 10, 10-20, and at to minutes past the 
hour until 11-20 P. M. 



GOV. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 

I continued from pa*" • > J 



Thtraan Seven Good Reasons why you should 
buy your 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



I 



well as their timber. The two will 
leave in April for a trip of inspec- 
tion through the forests of Califor- 
nia. Oregon and Washington, east 
through Idaho, Montana and Wyo- 
ming, south through Utah and Colo- 
rado, and thence to the White 
Mountain reservation late in Au- 
gust. Besides offering suggestions 
for the immediate solution of some 
of the more pressing problems which 
confront the forest service. Professor 
Waugh will outline the general poli- 
cies for the landscape treatment of 
the forest areas, and devise some 
plan of organisation for the carrying 
out of these ideas. It is expected 
that in a short time the work of this 
phase of the forest problem will de- 
mand the establishment of a perman- 
ent landscape department, which 
would have charge of laying out ths 
roads, trails and camp sites through- 
out the forest areas. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 

Lunches, Soda, Ice Cream 

CW «Uy frwm t A M h 4 AM 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

10 Mllea of Trackage Hodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System - Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave Amherst for M. A. C. at 6 OS, 625, 
7-00,7-30,800,8-15,9.15,9-3°. 10 «5> ,0 -J°» 

11-15, 11 30, 12-3°- '2-45. '-3°. '-45 and at 
45 minutes past the hour up to 9-45. a nfl 
at 10-30 and 1 1 00 P. m. 
Last car at 12-30 A. M. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rat*.* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



1 "II 1. T«»i : »ns , v PAIILOH 

Cif-analBg Pr»aa4aa K-i»»lrlnc 
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All work carefully doa«. Work esttod for and 
d«li»ered. Gent** overcoali. wit*, pant* »" d 
coat*. LadiM' fin* lman »oiU a iptciarl?. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WM. nc \s ki 1 n Prop. 
Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. Tal, No. |ffr4 



Amherst 



Jacob Reed's Sods are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

_ _ _ — _= ._ • a a A ■ • *• '* at 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High- Grade ColUgt Work 



Shiru, 
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DRY CLEANIHG AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing 40c, 3 Suits for f 1.00 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suii 

All Wits payable S* ("-op- Mora "d parcel* 
left there will receive prompt attention. 

(JKAvao* 'IT, Agent 

KioeiiraoTBAit 17. ami » *< 



J* 



8 c 

§1 









MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXVII. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 6, 1917. 



No. 17 



VARSITY QUINTET WINS IN 
OVERTIME GAME WITH N.H. 



Pond Breaks Deadlock in Final Minute 

of Play. Score 22-21. Return 

Game Saturday. 

In a close game that lasted into a 
five minute overtime period, the 
varsity basketball team came through 
with a victory over New Hampshire 
State at Durham Friday night, score 
22-21. Not until the final minute 
of play was the maroon team able to 
get the necessary point to win, when 
Pond caged a pretty shot from the 
center of the fioor, breaking the dead- 
lock. 

The New Hampshire quintet started 
with a rush, HawkeB scoring almost 
immediately from a pretty formation. 
Badger dropped in a free try, a in I 
Hawkes dropped in a basket from 
off the backboard on the next play, 
totaling five points against the M. A. 
C. team before they were well aware 
that the game was under way. 
While New Hampshire was piling up 
four points from the foul line, the 
Aggie team came to its own. Pond 
dropping in two and McCarthy cag- 
ing a difficult one from the corner of 
the court. F. Grayson added two 
more points on a clever shot from 
the center of the floor, but Stevens 
pal bis team one point in the lead at 
the dose of the half by scoring a long 
basket. The standing at the close 
of toe half being 11 to 10. The 
passing of both teams during the 
first half was fast, snd tbe intercept- 
ing of the Aggie guards was a 
revelation. 

Both teams secured three baskets 
from the floor in the second half. 
Pond and F. Grayson got two clean 
ones snd McCarthy tallied another 
from a pretty formation. This half 
closed with tbe standing 19 to 19. 
A Ave minute over time was decided 
upon, and Hawkes, who was easily 
tbe individual star of tbe New Hamp- 
shire team, dropped in a pretty 
basket. E. Grayson scored s foul 
shortly after making the score 20 to 
21, with the balance one point in 
favor of the home team. Pond came 
through with a pretty basket from 
the center of the floor, which won the 
game with one minute to play. 

Tbe game was exceptionally fast 
and tbe passing of both teams was 
clever. Sedgwick played a fine de- 
fensive game, intercepting most of 
tOawtSntSsttpssesi 



COMPLETE PROGRAM FOR ALUMNI DAY 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9 
8-10 A. M. to 12 M.— Alumni Address Classes. 
1-10 to 4-00 P. M.— Alumni Address Classes. 
4-10 P. M.— Alumni Forum, Stockbridge Hall. 
5-30 P. M.— Alumni Dinner, Draper Hall. 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10 
8-00 A. M. to 12 M.— Inspection of Campus. 
3-00 P. M.- Basket ball, M. A. C. vs. N. H. State. 
4-00 P. M. I nt erf rater n it y Relay Races. 
7-00 P. M.— Fraternity Initiation Banquets. 



EVERYTHING IN READINESS 
FOR ANNUAL ALUMNI DAY 



Graduates to Lecture Friday. Stu- 
dents May Exchange Classes. In- 
teresting Program for Forum. 

The motto of Alumni I >h v. Friday. 
Feb. 9, is evidently "something do- 
ing every minute" from the alumni 
lecturer beginning at 8- 1 in tbe 
morning until tlie last note of the 
musical clubs concert at night. It 
has been arranged to have different 
alumni address the regular classes on 
Fridav, so that the dav will be a sue- 
cession of "major talks." In order 
that students may exchange classes 
to hear the lectures by graduates in 
whom their are chiefly interested, a 
special cutting privilege haa been 
provided. The alumni headquarteis 
will lie in the Social Union rooms 
where they should register ss soon 
as possible. After the regular class 
schedule there is to be an Alumni 
Forum at 4-10. President Butterfield 
is to be the moderator at the forum 
and bss an interesting program of 
topics for discussion. Wheu the 
orators have Finished their debating 
the meeting will adjourn to the 
Commons. 

Every event where there are a lot 
of "tumblers" is more or less of a 
circus. The program for the Alumni 
•upper at Draper Hsll Friday even- 
ing, at 4-S0 promises to be one of the 
most interesting entertainments of 
this kind experienced for some time 
The dining ball is expected to be filled 
with a capacity audience that even- 
ing. As voiced In a previous an- 
nouncement it is expected that all 
students not eating at the Commons 
will show their interest by being there 
at this occasion. The members of 
the faculty are cordially iuvifpd to Ire 
present. 

OwHouaegMiil 



HOCKEY TEAM TO MEET 
WILLIAMS SEPTET SATURDAY 

Purple Seven Lost to Yale 3-2. Es- 
pecially Strong on the Offense. 
Probable Line-ups. 

The varsity hockey team leaves 
Friday morning for Williamstown 
fur the annual Williams contest, and 
from the ci editable maimer ii, which 
West Point and Yale were handled 
ihe Purple combination will Ih* pre- 
sented with an inteieslinggnme. 

In comparing (he teams, so far as 
men are concerned, William* has a 
team composed almost entirely of 
veterans from last year, five out of 
the seven regulars having won their 
letter, while M. A. C. has but two, 
L. Beta and Hut-trick. Williams is 
largely au offensive team with (apt. 
Rochester at rover, a fast man, 
forming the mainstay . while Kegardt 
at center haa contributed largely to 
the team's scoring. The Herkshire 
septet, however, shows its well bal- 
anced ability in Hi own and Collins 
forming tbe best paii of Williams 
hacks for several years, and a clever 
goal keeper in Hatch who is espec- 
ially capable on close range shots. 
So far Williams haa won from H. 
P. 1. 7-1, but was defeated by 
Princeton in December 2-1, and 
Yale 3-2. The Yale* game forms 

< ontlnucd itn pag*1l 



VICTORY COMES TO M. A. C. 
IN THREE MAJOR SPORTS 

Three victories in two days— that 
shows the way the Aggie varsity 
teams are travelling. Friday night 
the basketball five woo a haul 
game from N H. State, 22 21, 
while Saturday saw a 2 1 hockey 
victory over West Point and a 
winning relay race against Wor- 
cester Tech at ths B. A. A. games. 



SENIORS ELECT BUCKMAN 
FOR CLASS PRESIDENT 

Committees and Class Day Officers 

Chosen. Levy Tax of $25 per 

Man for 1917 Gift. 

The following class ollicers were 
elected at the senior class smoker held 
in the Social I'nion room lust Wed- 
nesday night : President, Lewi-, T. 
Buckman, WilkeM-Harre, Pa. ; vice- 
president, David II Huttrick, Arling- 
ton ; secretary, John T- Dizer, East 
i Wevuioiith ; treasurer, Samuel F. 
'Tuthill. Mnttniioisett ; captain, Km- 
orv K. < i ray son. Mi I fold . Sergeant 
at arms, Robert S. Holes, Dorchester ; 
class orator. Lincoln D. Kelsey, West 
Hartford, Conn. ; campus orator, Da- 
vid H. Huttrick ; ivy orator, Rob- 
ert ( '. Westmau,Rosiindale ; chairman 
of class day committee, Almon W. 
Spiiuldiug. Newton ; chairman of 
cap and gown committee, Roland W. 
Angers, Hraiotra , ehatarassa of pict- 
ure committee. Richard W. Smith, 
Pittsfield. 

A tax of $2'» was levied on each 
member of tbe class, 15 payable 
annually for five years, for the ptir- 
poss of obtaining a class gift. A 
very lively discussion was conducted 
over the issue of stocking the college 
pond with gold fish as a class gift and 
the merriment of the evening was by 
no means lessened by the staging of 
a mock tiial in which, Huttrick was 
judge ; Warner, clerk of court ; Holies, 
constable ; h>lsey. district attorney ; 
Huckman, counsel for the defence; 
and Wesiman. foreman of five intel- 
ligent jurors. 

Tbe Senior Class Day committee 
has been appointed by the chairman 
»s follow-* : Habcock, Honn. Dickey, 
Flint, Irving, Nelson, Noyea. Pratt. 
Saville,rYarner.Whiteomb, Whitney, 
Wilcox. 

The chairman of the picture com- 
mittee has chosen Boyce and Wal 
bridge as other member*. 

FORM WORTH SHORE CLUB 
The North Shore M. A. C. club 
was formed in the Social I'nion, Isat 
Tuesday evening. Tbe purpose of 
the club is to instigate more Inter 
est in M A. C. among high school 
men along the North Shore. Sidney 
Mai lo v 'IH of Lynn was elected pres- 
ident and Oliver G. Pratt *ff of 
Salem, secretary-treasurer. At tbe 
next meeting a committee is to be 
appointed to look tbe men in North 
Shore high schools who sre coming 
up here and to try snd get more If 
possible. 







2 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 1917. 



DEFEATS WORCESTER 



Maroon Relay Team Outruns Tech 
Men. Time 3.19 

Saturday night at the IV A. A. 
athletic game* M. A. C. rounded out 
a week of victories when the four- 
man relay team covered the 1500 yd. 
distance in three mimiteB and nine- 
teen seconds, heating Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute by 25 yds. 

The race was never in douht after 
the Drat lap had Iteen run and the 
time could undoubtedly have been 
lowered by several seconds if the 
Aggie men had been pushed at all. 

Worcestei won the pole on the 
toss and started with Green as the 
first man. He lead llainbridge, run- 
ning first for If. A. C M by about a 
yard at the first bank but before the 
second bank- Hainbridge was even 
and the two ran neck to neck on the 
second and third banks. On leaving 
the third bank Hainbridge swung to 
the outside of the track and was 
passing his man on the straightaway 
when the latter dropped his baton 
and before he could recover it Bain- 
bridge had secured a good 15-yd. 
lead which he kept for the next two 
laps and handed over to Clough. 
running second for MA. C. Clough 
increased the lead slightly over 
Knowlton, and Schmidt, i mining 
third for \Y. P. L, was unable to 
gain any distance on Yesair. Pratt, 
as anchor man for M. A. C. received 
I 20-yd. lead and in his 390 ydii. 
drew still further away from Francis, 
crossiug the line a good 25 yd*, 
in the lead. 

The passing of the batons by the 
II. A.. C men as well as the way 
they took the banks showed the re- 
sults of Coach Dickinson's work 
since the last meet, and with two 
more weeks of good practice the 
team should be in fine condition for 
the nt.xt race. 

(apt. Pratt was also entered in 
the 600- vi I. run and fooled the 
dopesters by taking first place in the 
second heat, tunning with a lo-yd. 
bandicap. The tiack was crowded 
in this event and Pratt contented 
himself with hugging the inside of 
the track, well back in the bunch until 
the last part of the final lap when he 
started to sprint and slipped by the 
last man at the tape. In the final 
heat he used the same tactics but 
when coining off the last bank he 
bumped another runner ami lost his 
itride long enough to fail to place. 

Dave Caldwell ex-* 18 was also 
entered In several events hut was not 
up to hie usual form and did not win 
out. 



SENIORS TIE SOPHOMORES 

IN INTERCLASS SERIES 

At the interclass basketball games 
Friday night, the seniors tied the 
sophomores for the series so far by 
defeating them 18-15 in a hard 
fought gam- The seniors obtained 
their lead iu ihe first half and con- 
tinued to hold it by a slight margin 
through the game. Walter Mack 
was high man for M7 with three 
goals from the floor and six foul 
aoals to his credit. Crowe shot 
seven goals from free tries and one 
from the floor. 

The line up : 

sk.mous. WPHOttOBM. 

Harlow, li r «< Whittle 

Kels.v.rl lo, Williams 

Mftok, C • •, Hlam-uard, ltat.helder 

1)aVi ] u< if. Petersen. Vic-kern 

Ror.trom.rg lf 4 Cwwe 

Score:- Seniors \»: Sophomores 15. 
Qoall mm. Hour-Mack 8, Kelsey I, 
Harlow. Vickers, 2, Crowe, 1'eterson. 
Goals from tm tries Mack 6, Crowe 
7. U.iVre. — Ashley of Amherst. Scorer 
— Wim;. Timer-Odams. Time— 30- 
m i it nt «- halves. 

1018 vs. 1920. 
The freshmen defeated the juniors 
by the same score of 18-15. It was 
due to the superior team work of 
1920 that they were able to carry off 
the laurels since the individual play 
of Minor and Gillette of '18 was very 
noticeable. Herman showed up well 
for the freshmen . 
The line-up : 

KliKSlIMKN. .I.SIOUS, 

Graves, lb r «. Moires 

Taylor, rf •», Gray 

4rsMtn>Bft,c l "- r ° t,nn 

Liuletiehl, l.evim- IfE ri, Minor 

Boreas, r B «, Alette 

Score: — Freshmen 18, Jtiuiorsl5.Uoals 
from ihe Hour -Armstrong 2. Berman 3, 
Graves. Taylor. Minor 4. Gray. Goals 
liotii louls- Beraaa 8, Armstrong 2. 
Gillette, •">• Heft-roe -Ashley of Am- 
(„.,„,. s.orer- Wing. Timer-Odama, 
Time 20-niinutes halves. 



Specialists in 

Students' Needs 

FOR generations we have served 
the college men and students 
of all New England and we know 
their requirements. 

Our stocks of Student Clothing, 
Haberdashery, Shoes, Athletic and 
Sporting Goods, Jewelry, Rugs, 
Desks and Books are complete and 
moderately priced. 

Sole Agents in Boston 
for the justly famous 

gmrirtij Iranb (HUrttjaa 

Free delivery to Amherst of 
any purchase — large or small. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 






Dr. L. O. Whitman 

21 Pleaaont St., Amherst, Masa. 

Office Hours: 1-3, 7-8 p. m. Sunday and 
other hours by appointment. 



TO DISCUSS AG. EC. MAJOR 
Since the aophomore elaat has de- 
cided to abolish major talks. Dr. 
Canee of the agricultural economics 
department la to give those sopho- 
mores interested in the workan oppor- 
tunity to gather some idea of the 
prospects of an economic major in 
Clark Hall H Wednesday evening at 

7 r, i 



WILBRrVHAM DEFEATS 1920 

The freshmen basketball team was 
defeated last Saturday afternoon by 
Wilbraham Academy in the Smith 
memorial gymnasium at Wilbraham. 
The game was about all that could be 
expected in the line of basketball, 
being clean and fast from start to 
finish. 

The line-up : 

•mJMAMAM. KKKSiiMAS. 

Beymore, 11 n,Stoa*«M 

( . .Stephens, rf '«. l' ent 

Huitt. < «'. Harrington, Richards 

Heavey, Ik rf, Uh-hardii, Vitfezzi 

Murj.hj -. W. Stephens. r« If, l,»!hrop 
.Hfure— Wilbraham 30 freshmen 17. 
Goal* from fli.ur-^eyiiiore. Hunt 11, C. 
.Stephens 2, Ilamiis>tnn 3, Richards, 

Lent. Steadman. coals rrom route - 

Seyumre 2, Lothrop 5. Time-20-inimite 

halve*. 



Croy§dale Jtmn 

HOUTH HADLEY. HASH. 

Good Bods and Good Things 
to Eat. 

Telephone 2flS»-W. Holyoke. 

C ox Sons & V inin g 

73 Madison Ave.. New York 

Caps 
Gowns 
floods 

for all Degrees 

ROBES FOR JUDICIARY, CLERGY AND CHOIR 



Eyes Examined 

Glasses Furnished 

oscar L. Mcculloch 

54 Suffolk St Holyoke, Mass. 

FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 

Northampton 




NEW WEATHER KAN 

The meteorological department ia 
dow under the charge of William P, 
Saunders M7 of Lawrence. James 
8. Sims of Melrose, the former 
"weather man" hai left college, in- 
tending to enrool at Yale in the Fall. 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. M l SSie h UMH I 

EUI0FEAN PLAN 

m« BMt I'Uce to Mb* 
aii Hindi • f lea fsoi 

Bpeetal luncheon from 11 -SO toS p. " 

—A to e*rt« ••»•**• — 
6-30 ».». u U-30 a. m. 

R. J, RAHAR, Prop. 





FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

Crown by the Floricultursl Dcpt. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern house* under 
ideal conditions. Rosea, carnations, 
violets, chryaanthemum* and sweet 
peas in season, 

QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone 8 OO 

The "Nonotuck" 

HOLYOKE'S LEADING HOTKI 



Breakfasts, 25c to 75c 
Business Ma's Luncheon, 60c 
Sunday Table tf'HoU Nmt, SI.25 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 1917. 



3 



ARMY FALLS BEFORE FAST 

MAROON PUCK SHOOTERS 

The Army hockey team went down 
to defeat at the hands of the maroon 
seven, in a close game played at West 
Point last Saturday afternoon. In 
spite of the perfect ice conditions, 
neither septet displayed particularly 
good form. Especially during the 
first half was the M Aggie" forward 
line lacking in aggressiveness. Both 
teams scored a tally in this session. 
House, the clever Army rover, shot a 
goal from a scrimmage in front of the 
"Aggie" cage after seven minutes of 
play, while the M. A. C. count was 
registered hy D, Ross with a long 
hard shot from the center of the rink. 
The half closed with the score one and 
one. The winning goal was scored 
by D. Ross, after seven minutes of 
play in the second period, who hroke 
through the Army forwards and shot 
a pretty goal past their defence. 
After this both teams tightened and 
there was no further scoring. 

The line-up : 

M. A. <\ WaST POINT. 

Hutu irk. \i jr. Nieuols 

L. Rosa, |i |i Armstrong 

I). Khmh, ep <"p. Murray 

i lii-liulin. r i . ll-Hi.-c 

.stilus, g c, lord 

Itlctuntmn. lw rw, rJarfee 

Oaarajr, rw lw, Sareka 

Sc.re -M. A. < . 2. West Poittt I. 
i.oalf, — tini half, House 7. OH. 1). !;<».* 
16J8 : seeoad half, L>. Kohh h.2.">, Ueferee 
— Lieut. Purdon. Timer— Tadet Jank. 
Tlase 2"» ami ir»-niinutc period*. 



VOTE TO COMPLETE FENCE 

Athletic Committee Also Amends 

Eligibility Rule. Adopts Basket- 
ball Insignia 

A motion was passed at a meeting 
of the Joint Committee on Athletics 
to complete the enclosing of the ath- 
letic field by building a fence on the 
east side. Work will be started in 
the spring as soon as weather con- 
ditions will permit, with the end in 
view of having the field completely 
enclosed for the Amherst game. 

The following amendment was 
made to the eligibility rule, "All 
students playing on outside teams 
during the school term without first 
abtaining permission from the phys- 
ical director, shall be declared inel- 
igible to represent the college in 
intercollegiate competition." 

The basketball insignia was de- 
cided upon as a four inch block "M" 
with a two inch k 'B" on either side. 



Professois William 1). Clark of 
the forestry and Orton L. Clark of 
the botany department and George 
H. Chapman assistant vegetable 
pathologist at the experiment station 
have been suggested as possible can- 
didates for the office of Amherst tree 
warden to succeed Dr. George E. 
Stone. 

DR. GEO. A. HASWELL 

Osteopath 



Central Chambers, Center Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

Phone 1027-W 



HERST SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Th* Best Shine In Town. 

— Also — 

a«i».»«- Hepalriiiff 

Scatty and quickly done. 



GORHAM BENEDICT, Mgr 



PLAZA 

Northampton, Mass. 

Where the Ue«t 

Photo-Play 
Features ... 

Are shown, 

PROGRAM CHANGED OAILV 



TICKETS FOR PROM SHOW 
TO GO ON SALE THURSDAY 

It is often said that coming eventH 
cast their shadows and so it is with 
this year's Roister Doister production 
"The Arrival of Kitty" to be pre- 
sented as a feature of the Junior 
prom. This is one of the funuieBt 
comedies ever written, with many 
humorous and complicated situations 
which the members of the cast are 
portraying with marked ability The 
costumes for the "ladies" are made 
expressly for the production bvC.W. 
Ware of Boston and, are in the latent 
modes. Scenery is being painted 
by Seymour Parker, the scenery 
artist at the Northampton Academy 
of Music and constructed by J. Albert 
Boudway of the same company. 

Tickets go on sale Thursday at 
12-30 p. m. in the Y. M. C. A. office 
and may be reserved until Saturday 
of the week following when they 
will be placed on sale at Deuels drug 
store. The raanagment hopes I hat 
every student will try to see this prom- 
ised star production, for expense hat* 
been ignored in order to get a quality 
show in every way. Heie is ■ chance 
to see the prom girl, the junior in his 
swell clothes and a fine theatrical 
performance for the price of a trip 
to Springfield. 

A performance is to be given in 
Sunderland Friday evening. Feb. 16 
and trips to various towns and tritlei 
are being arranged by Manager Wil- 
liams for the week ends following 
the Prom show. 



MICROBIOLOGY SMOKER 

At seven o'clock Wednesday even- 
ing the Microbiology club will hold a 
smoker in the Social Union. Dr. 
Gage will speak on the subject "Arti- 
ficial cultivation of tissues outside of 
the body." This subject will be in- 
j teresting to all because of the prac- 
tical use it has been recently put to 
ia European hospitals. Sophomores 
considering microbiology as a major 
are especially invited to attend. 



Semi -Annual Clearance Sale 



$3 and $4 Derby* and Soft Hats Now $2 and $2.50 

Aquascutum Overcoats, Regular Pi ice £28 to I35, Sale Price $20 to $25 

PATRICK MACKINAWS 

. . Now $7.50 and $8 



Regular Price $ o and 5 12. 



Sheep Lined Coats, Regular Price *i8 to $21 



Sale Price $13.50 to $15.50 



—At- 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 



For 10 Days Only 



Come to us foi 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always tflad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Burpee's Seeds Grow 

FOR forty yran we havr rendered f,«th!ui MWI Pol lofty 
year* we h»vr tried to male each year * MfVIM mm- ii-ady 
ideal. '1 his untiring ejloit lia* built (or m not only Hie W 
Largest Mail Ordc* Seed BuMnet*. but alio a World 
reputation lor Efficiency and undifwt«J leader Jut. I hi 

Fortieth Anfltwmary Edition el Burpee'* Annual, thm 
"Leading American Seed Catslof" i* brighter and 
better than crm. It i« muled free. A postcard will hrmf A. 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, 

Burpee Building i pBtJedelphw 



F*«k^'^ fcSUmo© Store 

L;irgest St ock — Lowent Pric* 
Expert KepnirliiK-Heiit lenllHT tim-«l 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS IK- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 1917. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening 
by the Students Of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF KDiTOUS. 
RICHARD W. SMITH n. Billtor-iiH'Wef 

MARSHALL*). UNI'HKAIl <U. Mtfinn Editor 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCK'll. Aaaiatant EdUor 
WILLIAM 8AVILLE. .IR. It* Alnmni Editor 



of the season. The alnmni dinner, I 
the couct'it, and the frateruits ban- j 
quets «H will contribute their full 
share toward the enjoyability of the 
occasion. Let every man on the c»m>- 
pua do his part toward making Fri- 
day and Saturday a real Aggie home 
coming. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 



N. Y. to Field Agent Charles Gould 
* Hi asking for views of the campus 
and to arrange for a speaker to ad 
dress their "Go to college club." 



Associ atk K i > nous. 

JOHN T IMZKR Ml 

JOSEPH K. WHITNEY '11 
KKANK .1. IUNKKMm 

NATHAN W. OILLErTE "IS 

KLIOT M. BUKFl'M '19 

M V KTOS F. SVANB M» 

BU8INKSS I >KI* A KTM EST. 
MERRILL F. WARNER '17. Hualneaa Manager 
JAMES C. FOWELL IK. 

Aaaiatant Itiiaineaa Manage! 

BIRO BR R. ROSKOl 1ST Ms. 

Arivertlaing Manager 

Subscription |8.00 per year. Single 
copies. 8 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Merrill P. Warner. 

In case of Bhftngl " f :»dilress, sub- 
scribers will please notify t he l.nsiness 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered Mierond-rlaw matter at the Aniherat 
Post Ofllce. 

▼•L JLXfll. Tuesday. *>*. 6. Mo. 17 



7 on r 



il-4."» 



Three years of military training 
do not constitute a compelling force 
to make college men eager for war. 
Quite often it only serves to con- 
vince them that war is everything 
that General Sherman said it was. 
and more. Thus the position of the 
Tnited States in the present world 
situation cannot fail to challenge the 
attention of every student in a land 
grant college, because, in the event 
of serious trouble, theirs will be an 
important part to play in the volun- 
teer military system of the country. 
Aggie men know well enough what 
will be expected of them when the 
emergency comes, and their record 
in years past insures their doing 
their part with ciedit. But now it 
is time to think quietly of what the 
obligations of military service really 
mean and to make sure that enthus- 
iasm doesn't get the bettei of sound 
judgment. 



Wkuxknua v. Ki ii. 7 
2-10 i\ M.— Assembly, l'l'esideiil Ki-n- 

y,ill L. UuUerlield. 
;>-00 i\ \i.— lnierfralernity Kelay KaoSS. 
*1K vs. K K 
Kl' + vs. 8 X 
1 l> B vs. H K «t> 
;,-(K) I-. Nt. Varsity llorkey, !S|.riii«- 
lield V. M- •'• A. Collet-, 
sprinutield. 
m. \uii.iiltuial Economies 

club meeting, Clark Ball. 

Boom B. Speaker. Dr. Came. 

H ._ Btockbridga Dlob — 102 

Sioekl>ridge — business. 
7-tm i- M.-Mieiohiology Cittb Smoker, 
Social I'nion. 
Tin -usiiav, Fkii. H 
7-00 PI. at, -lnterclass Hasketl.all (iames 
Dull Hall. 
1919 vs. 1998 
1911 vs. 1918 
740P.M. Dramatics bcheaisal. Vutli- 
(orium. 
Fr.inw, Fkii. t» 

A I n m ni Da\ 
.Vim P. m— Inicrlialcriiiis bcla\ R»oae. 

\ X A vs 2 + B 
(JT \ vs. aS9 

Svn KI> \ v. Kl li. 19 

Alumni Day. 

si \n\Y. Fkii. II 
ti-10 \. M.-<hapel, Uev. Vbiahaui II 
Hihbany, Church of the Dtl 
riples. Boston 



COMMONS CLUB PLEDGES 25 
The Following men have pledged 
Commons Club : 

(/nimby, Charles F. Cape Ned- 
dick, Maine 
Crane, Arthur F. North Andover 
Krickson, tJuiiuar b. I*f00 

Garde, Karle A. Lyao 

Hodgson, Benjamin K. Methueo 



RESULTS OF SECOND MATCH 

The unofficial score of the second 
match of the rifle team, aliot for the 
week ending Feb. 3rd, was rather 
low. But the team was consistent 
in shooting because the total score. 



HUT. 
l-.M'.i. 



1020. 



Jewell, Charles H. 
Moor. F.rwin C, 

Muul, .lollll It. 

I'arke. Uoherl \V. 
Stevens, Horace D. 
si earns Chester D. 
St rack, Edward, 
Woodard, Chester S 
BabOOek, Lester K. 
Ball, Harry A. 
Hlake, Uobert A. 

i aid, Kalph 11. 

Derick, (Mendon H. 

Hayms, Charles F. 

Iliini, liordon K. 

l,iml<|iiist, Harry <■. 

MeD«»nald, Milton C. 

McNulty, Raymond H. 

I'lowwan, Ceorge T. .Ir 
throp 

Siniili, FredC. 



922, was 
match. 
The score 



F. H. Caulett, 
A. B. Loring, 
K. F. Parsons, 
S. F. Tuthill, 
0. U. Pbipps, 



the Bame as in the first 



Mainline 

91 

90 
91 
86 
H 



Frone 
100 

05 

00 

96 

95 



Merrimac 
bynu 
Tolland 
Winchendtin 
Walt ham 
Heading 
Krainingham 
I.everett 
Marlboro 
Bridgewater 
Wollaslon 
Soiuerville 
Clinton 
Boston 
Millbury 
Holdeu 
Beabody 
Amherst 
WLii- 



Total, 



Total 
191 
185 
183 

182 
181 

922 



iJardner 
A. M. 



Fiofessor John Phelan, 
Professor of Rural Sociology, has 
been elected to honorary member- 
ship in the Massachusetts chapter of 
Commons Club. 



ADDRESSES LANDSCAPE CLUB 
William E. Philbrick of the office 
of Morell and Nichols, landscape 
architects, Minneapolis, addressed 
the students in landscape gardening 
Monday afternoon. Mr. Philbrick, 
who is a graduate of Massachusetts 
Agricultural college in the class of 
191 2, has had considerable experience 
iu landscape work in the northwest 
and told the class of the advantages 
and disadvantages of work in that 
part of the United States. 

•15.— Chester P. Spofford of 
Georgetown and Miss Susie M.Haael- 
tine were united in marriage in 
Haverhill, Jan. 2, Rev. Derbyshire 
officiating. Miss M. Diss King of 
Woonsocket. R. 1 was maid of 
honor and R. F. McKechnie '15 best 
man. 



The program as arranged for this 
year's Alumni day offers some strik- 
ing innovations which will mark it as 
a step in advance of all previous 
efforts. Chief of these is the plnii to 
have a series of real live "major 
talkB" by Aggie graduates who have 
used successfully the training which 
they received heie. The men of the 
undergraduate body have now an op- 
portunity to learn about their chosen 
vocations from first hand ami with the 
emphasis put upon the practical re- 
quirernente involved. To any man 
who looks forward to preparation for 
some definite work in the world these 
talks should prove invaluable. For 
the returning alumni there will be 
plenty of things to make them feel 
glad they came. The first vanity 
basketball team in eight years will 
line np against New Hampshire for 
what should be one of the best game* 



ABOUT THE CAMPUS 

Winfield B. Beauregard '10 of Fra- 
ud ngham has pledged Sigma Phi 

Kpsilon. 

Captain and Mrs. Klect are ex- 
pected to return to Amherst Sunday 
from their vacatiou spent in Wash- 
ington. I). C.i Atlanta, Ga. and 
New York City. 

According to the monthly report 
of the meterological station here at 
the college we had in January 15 
laches of suowfall and M days of 
sleighing. The temperature went up 
to 47.. r ) w one day and reached its 
lowest Jan. 27 wheu it touched H.5* 
below zero. 

As a mark of appreciation to aud 
respect for a man who is willing to 
face the severest of trials for the 
sake of an education, the student 
hod« at Friday chapel services, con- 
tributed 1105 to be used in covering 
the major expenses of Satwaji Mut- 
kekar of India who is undergoing an 
operation at Springfield. 

As a part of the campaign for ad- 
vertising the college to the high 
school pupils of the state, a co